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Full text of "Loss of the Sultana and reminiscences of survivors. History of a disaster where over one thousand five hundred human beings were lost, most of them being exchanged prisoners of war on their way home after privation and suffering from one to twenty-three months in Cahaba and Andersonville prisons"

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LOSS OF THE SULTANA 



AND 



REMINISCENCES 



OF 



SURVIVORS 



HISTORY OF A DISASTER WHERE OVER ONE THOUSAND FIVE 
HUNDRED HUMAN BEINGS WERE LOST, MOST OF THEM 
BEING EXCHANGED PRISONERS OF WAR ON 
THEIR WAY HOME AFTER PRIVATION AND 
SUFFERING FROM ONE TO TWENTY- 
THREE MONTHS IN»CAHABA 
AND ANDERSONVILLE 
PRISONS. 



By rev. CHESTER D.' BERRY. <^^'^^^ 



LANSING, Mlf'H. 

DARIUS D. THORP, PRINTER AND BINDER. 

1892. 



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1892, by 

REV. CHESTER D. BERRY, 

In the office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington, D. C. 



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TO THE 
SURVIVORS OF THE GREAT- 
EST MARINE DISASTER ON RECORD, AND TO 
THE FRIENDS OF THOSE WHO PERISHED IN THAT 
AWFUL SCENE OF HORROR, IS THIS LITTLE 
VOLUME RESPECTFULLY 
DEDICATEP. 



INTRODUCTION. 



TTHE average American is astonished at nothing ho 
^ sees or hears. He looks for large things. Things 
ordinary are too tame. This, and the exciting events of 
April, 1865, perhaps account for the fact that the loss 
of the steamer " Sultana" and over 1,700 passengers, 
mostly exchanged prisoners of war, finds no place in 
American history. The idea that the most appalling 
marine disaster that ever occurred in the history of 
the world should pass by unnoticed is strange, but 
still such is the fact, and the majority of the American 
people today do not know that there ever was such a . 
vessel as the ^' Sultana.^' And many of those who do 
recollect something about the occurrence cannot tell \ 
whether it occurred in the Mississippi river, the ^ulf \ 
of Mexico, or the Atlantic ocean; and the purpose j 
of setting them right and instructing others, thus \ 
holding in the memory of the present generation and i 
those yet to be the sufferings of the defenders of our ^ 
country, is the object of this sketch. 

The steamer ''Sultana'' was built at Cincinnati, 
Ohio, January, 1863, and was registered, as near as I 
can learn, at 1,719 tons. She was a regular St. Louis 
and New Orleans packet, and left the latter port on 
her fatal trip April 21, 1865, arriving at Vicksburg, 
Miss., with about two hundred passengers and crew 
on board. She remained here little more than one 



8 IKTRODUCTIOX, 

(lay; among o'her things repairing one of her boilers, 
at the same time receiving on board 1,965 fed- 
eral soldiers and 35 officers just released from the 
rebel prisons at Cahaba, Ala., Macon and Anderson- 
ville, Ga., and belonging to the States of Ohio, Indi- 
ana, Michigan, Tennessee, Kentucky, and West Vir- 
ginia. Besides these there were two companies of 
infantry under arms, making a grand total of 2,300 
souls on board, besides a number of mules and horses, 
and over one hundred hogsheads of sugar, the latter 
being in the hold of the boat and serving as ballast. 
At Helena, Ark., by some unaccountable means a pho- 
tograph of the boat with her mass of living freight was 
taken, a copy of which is in possession of L. G. Mor- 
gan of Findlay, Ohio, one of the survivors today. 

Leaving Helena the boat arrived at Memphis, Tenn., 
about seven o'clock, p. M.,of the 26th of April. Here the 
sugar was unloaded, many of the exchanged prisoners 
helping the crew, thus making a little money for 
themselves. Sometime in the evening, probably well 
towards midnight, the boat steamed across the river to 
the coal bins or barges and, after taking on her supply 
of coal, started on, up the river, for Cairo, 111. All 
was quiet and peaceful, many of the soldiers, no doubt, 
after their long, unwilling fast in southern prisons, 
were dreaming of home and the good things in store 
for them there, but alas I those beautiful visions were 

r. dissipated by a terrific explosion, for, about two o'clock 
in the morning of the 27th, as the boat was passing 
through a group of islands known as the '*01d Hen 
v^nd Chickens," and while about opposite of Tagle- 
man's Landing had burst one of her boilers and almost 



INTRODUCTIOIS^. 9 

immediately caught fire, for tho fragments of the 
boiler had cut the cabin and the hurricane deck in 
tivo and the splintered pieces had fallen, many of 
them, back upon the burning coal fires that were now 
left exposed. The light, dry wood of the cabins burned 
like tinder and it was but a short time ere the boat 
was wrapped in flames, burning to the water's edge 
and sinking. Hundreds were forced into the water 
and drowned in huge squads, those who could swim 
being unable to get away from those who could not and 
consequently perishing with them. One thing favor- 
able for the men was the fact that there was a little 
wind, hence the bow of the boat, having no cabin 
above it, would face the wind until the cabin was 
burned off from the stern, then the boat gradually 
swung around, the unburned part of the boat above 
the water acting as a sail while that below acted as a 
rudder, and finally drove the men into the water. A 
part of the crowd was driven at a time, thus giving 
many of those who could swim or had secured frag- 
ments of the wreck an opportunity to escape. 

But there was one thing that was unfavorable, and 
that was the pitchy darkness of the night. It was 
raining a little, or had been, and but occasional 
glimpses of timber were all that could be seen, even 
when the flames were the brightest, consequently the 
men did not know what direction to take, and one 
man, especially, swam up stream. Another thing that 
added greatly to the loss of life is the fact that the 
river at this place is three miles wide, and at the time 
of the accident it was very high and had overflown its 
banks, and many, doubtless, perished after they reached 



10 introductio:n". 

the timber while trying to get through the woods 
back to the bluffs, the flats being deeply under water. 
Others died from exposure in the icy-cold water after 
they had reached the timber, but were unable to climb 
a tree or crawl upon a log and thus get out of the 
water. 

Among the passengers on board were twelve ladies, 
most of them belonging to the Christian commission, 
an association akin to that of the sanitary commission 
of the Army of the Potomac. One of these ladies, 
with more than ordinary courage, when the flames at 
last drove all the men from the boat, seeing them 
fighting like demons in the water in the mad endeavor 
to save their lives, actually destroying each other and 
themselves by their wild actions, talked to them, urg- 
ing them to be men, and finally succeeded in getting 
them quieted down, clinging to the ropes and chains 
that hung over the bow of the boat. The flames now 
began to lap around her with their fiery tongues. The 
men pleaded and urged her to jump into the water 
and thus save herself, but she refused, saying: ''I 
might lose my presence of mind and be the means of 
the death of some of you." And so, rather than run 
the risk of becoming the cause of the death of a single 
person, she folded her arms quietly over her bosom and 
burned, a voluntary martyr to the men she had so 
lately quieted. 

In the official list the names seem to have been taken 
without reference to rank or State they were from; 
sometimes, apparently, a squad from one company or 
regiment would be taken together, but often it was the 
case that they were all mixed up. In other cases many 



INTRODUCTION. 11 

were left out; for instance, a sergeant came to me and 
asked to see the official list. It was shown him. 
*^ Why/' said he, '* there are but ten of my company 
reported here iand I know there were eighteen of us." 
This has been true in quite a number of cases. 

On December 30, 1885, at a convention called in Fos- 
toria, Ohio, there was a committee appointed, consisting 
of A. C. Brown, P. L. Horn, Wm. Fies, A. W. King, and 
G. N. dinger, to prepare a suitable memorial and 
present the same to Congress, praying for a pension 
for each of the survivors of the lost *' Sultana.'* 



12 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 



The Burnina: of the Snltaim. 

By Wm. H. Norton, Company C, 115th Ohio. 



Midnight's dreary hour has past, 
The mists of night are falling fast. 
Sultana sounds her farewell blast. 

And braves the mighty stream ; 
The swollen river's banks o'erflow. 
The leaden clouds are hanging low 
And veil the stars' bright silver glow. 

And darkness reigns supreme. 

Her engine fires now brighter burn, 
Her mammoth wheels now faster turn. 
Her dipping paddles lightly spurn 

The river's foaming crest ; 
And drowsy Memphis, lost to sight, 
Now fainter shows her beacon light, 
As Sultana steams in the dead of night, 

And the Union soldiers rest. 

The sleeping soldiers dream of home. 
To them the long-sought day had come. 
No more in prison pens to moan, 
» Or guarded by the gray ; 
At last the changing fates of war 
Had swung their prison " gates ajar," 
And "laurel wreaths " from the North afar 
Await their crowning day. 

For Peace has raised her magic hand, 
The Stars and Stripes wave o'er the land, 
The conquered foemen now disband, 

'* As melts the morning dew ;" 
And mothers wear their wonted smile, 
And aged sires the hours beguile. 
And plighted love awaits the while 

The coming of the blue. 

On sails the steamer through the gloom, 
On sleep the soldiers to their doom, 
And death's dark angel— oh ! so soon- 
Calls loud the muster-roll. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 13 

A— buret-a-crash— and— timbers fly, 
And— flame— and— steam— leap to the sky, 
And— men-awakenad— but- to die- 
Commend to God their souls. 

Out from the flame's encircling fold, 
Like a mighty rush of warriors bold. 
They leap to the river dark and cold. 

And search for the hidden shore. 
In the cabins,— and— pinioned-there, 
Amid-the— smoke— and— fire— and -glare. 
The— awful— wail— of— death's— despair 

Isjheard above the roar. 

Out on the river's rolling tide, 

Out from the steamer's burning side. 

Out where the circle is growing wide. 

They battle with the waves. 
And drowning men each other clasp. 
And wi-itliing in death's closing grasp 
They struggle bravely, but at last 

Sink to watery graves. 
Oh ! for the star's bright silver light ! 
Oh ! for a moon to dispel the night ! 
Oh ! for the hand that should guide aright 

The way to the distant land ! 
Clinging to driftwood and floating down, 
Caught in the eddies and whirling around, 
Washed to the flooded banks are found 

The survivors of that band. 



14 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 



Destruction of the Steamer '* Sultana^' in the Mississippi 
River, near Memphis, Tenn., April 27, 1865, 



From the records of this Department it would appear that 
the steamer "Sultana" left Vicksburg, Miss., on April 24, 
1865, and was destroyed on the Mississippi river, near Mem- 
phis, Tenn., on April 27, 1865. 

A court of inquiry was thereupon ordered by Major General 
C. C. Washburne, commanding district of West Tennessee, to 
investigate the facts and circumstances of the burning of the 
♦♦Sultana." 

On April 30, 1865, the Secretary of War instructed Brevet 
Brigadier General Hoffman, commissary-general of prisoners', 
to inquire into the circumstances of the destruction of the 
steamer referred to, which officer, on May 19, 1865, mad© the 
following report : 

«' Office of the Commissary-General of Prisoners, 
Washington, D. C, May 19, 1865. 
''Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War, Washington, D. C: 

"Sir — Pursuant to your instructions of the 30th ult., 1 pro- 
ceeded direct to Memphis, Tenn., and Vicksburg, Miss., to 
inquire into the circumstances of the destruction of the 
steamer * Sultana ' in the Mississippi river, near Memphis, on 
the 24th ult., by which calamity a large number of paroled 
prisoners, who had embarked on her at Vicksburg, lost their 
lives, and I have the honor to submit the following report of 
the result of my investigations : 

" At Memphis I learned that a court of inquiry had been 
ordered by Major General Washburne, commanding district 
of West Tennessee, to investigate the facts and circumstances 
of the burning of the * Sultana,' and at Vicksburg I learned that 
a commission had been ordered by Major General Dana, com- 
manding department of the Mississippi, to make a similar 
investigation. The court and the commission were about 
closing their proceedings when I arrived at Vicksburg, and 
finding, upon a perusal of their records, that all the testimony 
taken would be useful to me in forming an opinion as to the 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 15 

merits of the case, I determined to avail myself of a copy of 
them, which I was permitted to do through the courtesy of 
the generals by whom the investigations were made. 

** In addition to the above I obtained such further testimony 
that was within my reach, as I thought necessary to a full 
understanding of the matter. Upon a careful consideration 
of all the facts as presented in the testimony herewith sub- 
mitted, I am of the opinion that the shipment of so large a 
nuuiber of troops (1,866), on one boat, was, under the circum- 
stances, unnecessary, unjustifiable, and a great outrage on the 
troops. 

"A proper order was issued by the general commanding the 
department for the embarkation of the paroled prisoners, and 
there were four officers of his staff who were responsible that 
this order was properly carried out, viz: Col. K. B. Hatch, 
captain in the quartermaster's department, chief * quarter- 
master ; Capt. Frederic Speed, A. A. G., U. S. Volunteers, 
adjutant general department of Mississippi ; Capt. Geo. A. 
Williams, 1st U. S. Infantry, commissary of musters, and in 
charge of paroled prisoners, and Capt. W. F. Kernes, A. Q. M., 
U. S. Volunteers, and master of transportation. If there was 
anything deficient or unsuitable in the character of the trans- 
portation furnished, one or more of these officers should be 
held accountable for the neglect. 

** The testimony shows that it was well understood by the 
four officers named that the troops in question were to embark 
on the "Sultana." She was provided by the master of traus- 
portation, with the approval of the chief quartermaster, upon 
the order of General Diua, thoagh not up^n a formal requisi- 
tion, and Captain Speed and Captain Williams were to super- 
intend the embarkation. Nothing was known positively as to 
the number of men that were to go on board, but it was the 
impression that there would be from 1,300 to 1,500 ; nor was 
any inspection of the boat made by either of the officers above 
named to determine her capacity or her condition. Neither 
one of them knew whether she had proper apparatus for cook- 
ing for so many men, or other necessary conveniences required 
for troops on transports. The troops were sent to the steamer 
from the camp in three parties, as is shown by the testimony 



16 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

of Mr. Butler, superintendent of military railroads at Vicks- 
burg, though Captain Speed and Captain Williams knew only 
of the first and third parties ; the second party consisted of 
between 300 and 400 men. As the men were being embarked 
Captain Kernes seems to have been satisfied that too many 
were going on one boat and he so reported to Colonel Hatch, 
who agreed with him in this belief but failed to interfere him- 
self, as it was his duty to do, or to make any report of the 
matter to General Dana, because, as he states, he had had a 
day or two before some difficulty with Captain Speed about 
the shipment of troops. There were two other steamers at the 
landing during the day, both of which would have taken a 
part of the men, and there was, therefore, no necessity for 
crowding them all on one boat ; it only required an order from 
Colonel Hatch, or a representation of the facts to the com- 
manding general. 

** Both Captain Speed and Captain Williams acted under the 
impression that there were only about 1,400 men to be for- 
warded, and having also a conviction that bribery had been 
attempted to induce the shipment of part of the men 
on the 'Pauline Carroll' they, during the day. resisted 
the proposition to divide the command between the two boats, 
in the belief that in doing so they resisted an attempt at fraud. 
It was not until the troops were all on board that they became 
aware of the fearful load that was on the boat, and then they 
seemed to think it too late to make any change, but neither of 
them made any inspection of the boat to see whether there was 
room enough for every man to lie down. The testimony 
shows, and by a calculation of the area of the three decks I 
am satisfied, that there was scant sleeping room for all the men 
when every part of the boat from the roof of the ' texas ' to 
the main deck was fully occupied. At night it was impossible 
to move about and it was only with much difficulty that it 
could be done during the daytime. The cooking was done 
either by hot water taken from the boilers or at a small stove 
on the after-part of the main deck, and owing to the limited 
nature of this arrangement, the difficulty of getting about the 
boat, and the want of camp kettles or mess-pans, the cooking 
could not be very general. Before the troops embarked there 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 17 

were on the boat about sixty horses and mules and some hogs 
—one hundred or more. The great weight on the upper deck 
made it necessary to set up stanchions in many places in spite 
of which the deck perceptibly sagged. 

'*The impression seems to have baen entertained that the 
paroled troops, having been so long suffering together in rebel 
prisons, wore particularly anxious to go home together in the 
same boat, but there is no foun iation for this belief. The 
men were exceedingly anxious to return to their homes and 
were willing to put up with many inconveniences, but they 
felt that they were treated with unkindness and harshness 
when they vrere crowded together in great discomfort on one 
boat, when another eq lally good was lying alongside willing 
to take them. 

" From the foregoing, 1 am of opinion that the four officers 
above named are re.sp msible for the embarkation of so large 
a number of troops on an unsuitable vessel, Colonel Hatch 
and Captain Speed being the most censurable. It was their 
duty especially to see that the service was properly performed. 
Captain Williams was assisting Captain Speed, and seems to 
have felt that there was no special responsibility resting on 
him ; but there was a manifest propriety in his knowing the 
number embarked, and if there was a deticiency of transport- 
ation he should have reported it. Captain Kernes made no 
inspection of the steamer to see that she was properly fitted 
up, but he did report her to Colonel Hatch, and also to Gen- 
eral Smith, as being insufficient for so many troops, and his 
rep )rt should have been noticed. He made no report of the 
repairing of the boiler, which he seems to have been aware 
was going forward, and which it has not yet been deciied 
positively was not the cause of the disaster. Lieut. W. H, 
Tillinghast, 66th United States Colored Infantry, was the only 
other officer connected with this service, but he ha I no direct- 
ing control. It is shown by his own testimony that a bribe was 
proffered to him to induce him to use his influence in having 
some of the troops shipped on the * Pauline Carrol,' which he 
showed a willingness to accept — at least he did not reject it — and 
which he failed to report until after the loss of the " Sultana." 
The testimony of the four officers above referred to is very 
3 



18 ivOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

contradictory, and I have formed my opinion from the gen- 
eral tenor of the testimonj' and the circumstances of the em- 
barkation. 

"Brigadier General M. L. Smith, United States Volunteers, 
had command of the district of Vicksburg at the time, but he 
had nothing officially to do with the shipment cE the troops; 
yet as it was officially reported to him by Captain Kernes that 
too many men were being put in th-^ ' Sultana' it was proper 
that he should have satisfied himself, from good authority, 
whether there was sufficient grounds for the report, and if he 
found it so he should have interfered to have the evil rem- 
edied. Had he done so the lives of many men would have 
been saved. 

*' In reference to the immediate cause of the calamity, the 
testimony which I have been able to collect does not enable 
me to form a positive opinion. The testimony of the two 
engineers of the ' Sultana.' and of the inspector at St. Louis, 
establishes that her boilers were in good condition on her leav- 
ing that port for New Orleans, and apparently continued so 
until her arrival within ten hours run of Vicksburg, when a 
leak occurred in one of her boilers. On the arrival of the boat 
at Vicksburg this leak was repaired by a competent boiler- 
maker, and was pronounced by him a good job, though ho 
qualifies the character of the work by saying that, to have 
been thorough and permanent, the two sheets adjoining the 
leak should have been taken out, and that, in its then condi- 
tion, it was not perfect. The first engineer, Mr. Wintringer, 
testifies that after leaving Vicksburg he watched the repaired 
part of the boiler, which was near the front end, just over the 
fire-bars, carefully, and it did not at any time show the least 
sign of giving way. When he was relieved from charge of 
the engine by the second engineer the boilers were full of 
water and in good condition, and on their return to Memphis, 
the second engineer, Mr. Clemuians, who being on watch at 
the time of the explosion was fatally scalded, told him before 
he died that the boilers were all right and full of water. I 
was told by another engineer at Cincinnati that he had said the 
same thing to another person on landing at Memphis, but this 
other person was not within my reach. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 19 

" There is nothing to show that there was any careening of 
the boat at the time of the disaster, or that she was running 
fast ; on the contrary, it is shown that she was running evenly 
and not fast. 

"A piece of boiler was obtained from the wreck, by order 
of General Washburn, which I examined. It seemed to have 
been broken from the bottom of the boiler the breadth of a 
sheet and torn tapering to near the top of the boiler, tearing 
the iron like paper, at times through the rivet holes and then 
through the middle of the sheet. The lower or wider end 
seems to have been exposed to the fire without the protection 
of water, and if so, this doubtless was the cause of the explo- 
sion ; but this piece of iron may have been exposed to the fire 
of the burning vessel after the explosion, in whicU case some 
other cause must be found to account for it. The testimony 
of some of the most experienced engineers on the western 
rivers is given, to throw some light on the matter, but until 
the boilers can all be exammed, no reliable conjecture can bo 
made to account for the explosion. Thus far, nothing has 
been discovered to show that the disaster was attributable to 
the imperfect patching. It is the common opinion among the 
engineers that an explosion of steam bailers is impossible when 
they have the proper quantity of water in them, but the boilers 
may burst from an overpressure of steam w hen they are full of 
water, owmg to some defective part of the iron, in which case 
there is generally no other harm done than giving way of the 
defective part and the consequent escape of steam. One engi- 
neer, who is said to be the most reliable on the river, said that 
even in such a case the great power of the steam having once 
found a yielding place tears everything before it, producing the 
effect of an explosion, and his view seems to be reasonable. 

'* What is usually understood as the explosion of a boiler 
is caused by the sudden development of intense steam by the 
water coming in contact with red-hot iron, which produces an 
effect like the firing of gunpowder in a mine, and the destruc- 
tion of the boilers and the boat that carries them is the conse- 
quence. 

" The reports and testimony show that there were 1,866 
troops on board the boat, including 33 paroled officers ; one 



20 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

officer who had resigned, and the captain in charge of the 
guard. Of these, 765, including 16 officers, were saved, and 
1,101, including 19 officers, were lost. There were 70 cabin 
passengers and 85 crew on board, of whom some 13 to 18 were 
saved, giving the loss of 137; making the t'^tal loss 1,238. 

" I have the honor to submit herewith the following papers 
in support of the foregoing opinions, viz: Testimony taken 
before the Court of Inquiry ordered by Maj )r-G iueral Wash- 
burne, marked A; testimony taken before the commiss oa 
ordered by Major-General Dana, marked B ; testimony taken 
by myself, inclading testimony of Captain James McCjwh, 
6th Kentucky Cavalry, taken before Colonel Bxdeau of Gen- 
eral Grant's staff, marked C, and the report of Maj or-General 
Dana, commanding department of Mississippi, marked D. 
*• I have the honor to be, very respectfully, 

" Your obedient servant, 

*' W. HOFFMAN, 
^' Brevet Brigadier-General U. S. Army, 
Commissary-General of Prisoners.'' 



ViCKSBURG, Miss., May 7, 186-5. 
Will General Dana please state what officer, or officers, ho 
considers responsible for the shipment of the paroled troops 
within referred to and for the proper character of the traas- 
portatioD. Very respectfully, 

W. HOFFMAN, 
Commissary-General Prisoners. 



Headquarters Department of Mississippi, 
ViOKSBURG, May 8, 1805. 
Respectfully returned to Brigadier-General Hoffman. Cap- 
tain Speed was entrusted with the transfer and shipment of 
the prisoners and assumed full and active management and 
control of it. and I therefore consider him fully responsible 
therefor. The quartermaster's department was ordered to 
provide the transportation, and I consider Captain Kernes, 



LOSS OF THE SULTAKA. 21 

quartermaster in charge of transportation, responsible for the 
character of it. N. J. T. DANA, 

Major General, 



The report of Major-General Dana is as follows: 

♦'Headquarters Department of Mississippi, 
ViCKSBURG, May 8, 1865. 

*' Brigadier-General W. Hoffman, United States Army, Com- 
missary-General of Prisoners : 

"In compliance with your verbal request this morning I 
have the honor to report as follows regarding the shipment of 
paroled federal prisoners from here: 

"The commissary of musters of this department. Captain 
George A. Williams, 1st U. S. Infantry, was, by my order in 
the latter part of March, placed in charge of the duties per- 
taining to an assistant commissioner of exchange, with a view 
to transaction of business with the rebel agents then in charge 
of federal prisoners of war who were arriving under flag of 
truce. 

" The rebel commissioners having positively declined to turn 
over any prisoners till they received an equivalent, Captain 
Williams was sent, first to Mobile and then to Cairo, to com- 
municate with Major-General Canby, Lieutenant-General 
Grant and Brigadier- General Hoffman. 

** During his absence. Captain Frederick Speed, assistant 
adjutant-general of this department, at his own suggestion, 
was assigned by me to the performance of Captain Williams' 
duties, and took entire charge of the receiving of prisoners 
from the rebel agents and of sending them to the parole camps 
at the north. 

"During Captain Williams' absence at the north, orders 
were received, through me, by the rebel officials from Colonel 
Ould, rebel commissioner, by which they were induced to 
parole the prisoners ; and I then ordered Captain Speed to pre- 
pare tlieir rolls as rapidly as possible and send them north as 
rapidly as the rolh could be prepared, calculating, as near as 
circumstances would permit, about 1,000 at a load for the 
regular packets as they passed. 



22 LOSS OF THE SULTAKA. 

"The first load which was seat north was expected to be 
about 800, as that was about the number for which rolls were 
completed when the * Henry Ames' was expected. She was 
delayed, however, and by the time she was ready to leave the 
rolls were ready for upwards of 1,300, and she carried them 
off. I had taken great interest in expediting the departure of 
these brave fellows to their homes and I went down to see this 
load start. 

''The next load was by the steamboat 'Olive Branch,' 
which arrived so soon after the departure of the 'Ames ' that 
rolls for only about 700 were ready for her. 

"After she left Capt. Speed came to me in considerable 
indignation and asked for authority to place Capt. Kernes, the 
quartermaster of transportation at this post, in arrest. He 
stated that he had ordered all boats to be reported to him 
immediately on arrival and to await orders; that this boat had 
arrived in the middle of the night and had not been reported 
to him till eight o'clock next morning ; and that she had been 
unnecessarily detained after being loaded; and that he had 
been informed that this delay was made because she did not 
belong to the line which had the government contract ; and 
that the contract line had offered a pecuniary consideration, 
per capita, for the men to be kept for their boats; and the 
intention was to detain the ' Olive Branch ' till one of the 
contract line came along to take the load from her. I directed 
him not to arrest Captain Kernes till he was satisfied, upon 
proper investigation, that the reports he had heard were well- 
founded. 

" The next boat was the * Sultana,' and she arrived so soon 
after the departure of the * Olive Branch ' that Captain Speed 
reported to me that rolls for only about 300 men could be pre- 
pared, and that, therefore, none would go by her, but they 
would wait for the next boat. 

" Capt. Williams had arrived from the north in the night. 
Soon after making his first report Capt. Speed came to my 
office and report^^d that he had consulted with Capt. Williams 
and had decided to ship all the balance of prisoners on the 
* Sultana,' as Capt. Williams had advised that they be counted 
and checked as they went on board and he would prepare the 



LOSS OF THE SULTAISTA. 23 

rolls afterwards. I expressed satisfaction at this and asked 
how many there would be, and he replied about 1,300— not to 
exceed 1,400 — that the exact number could not be stated owing 
to discrepancies in the rebel rolls. 

** About the middle of the day Capt. Williams came and 
reported that the captain of the ' Sultana ' said he would 
leave in an hour or two and that a large proportion of the 
men were still out at the parole camp, and he did not believe 
that proper exertions wero being made to get them off, and 
that he had been informed that a pecuniary consideration had 
been offered, per capita, for the detention of the men and ship- 
ment of them on the other line, and that he thought Capt. 
Speed was practicing delay purposely for the detention of the 
men till the ' Sultana ' should leave and a boat of the other 
line arrive. I then informed Capt. Williams of what Capt. 
Speed had previously reported regarding Capt. Kernes and his 
clerks, and stated that I thought he had the rumor wrong. 
He promised to investigate it, and afterwards reported to me 
that he was entirely mistaken as regarded Capt. Speed. I 
also ordered a telegram to b3 sent to Capt. Speed informing 
him that the boat would leave in an hour or two, and inquir- 
ing if any more men would go by her. 

"After dark Capt. Speed reported that all the men were 
in from camp. 

"Up to this moment I considered that he had performed 
his difficult task with great ^satisfaction and efficiency. 

"The next morning on visiting my office I inquired of 
Capt, Speed whether the boat had left and was informed she 
had. I then inquired as to the exact number of men she had 
taken, and was astonished to hear that there were 1,900. Hav- 
ing never seen the boat, I inquired as to her capacity and as to 
the comfort of the men and was assured by both Capt. Speed 
and Capt. Williams that the load was not large for the boat, 
that the men were comfortable and not overcrowded and that 
there were very few boats which had so much room for troops 
as the * Sultana.' 

" I had, at first, intrusted the whole exchange business to 
Capt. Williams, but he having left Capt. Speed was placed in 
charge of it, in addition to his other duties, by my orders. He 



24 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

assumed and managed it a3 I thought with ability and I never 
had any report or complaint, further than is stated above, 
prior to the deplorable calamity to the boat, aad was not 
informed of any other circumstances in the details of the 
whole matter. 

"I am, very respectfully, etc., 

*'N. J. T. DANA, 

Major-General.'' 



The testimony referred to in General Hoffman's report is 
on file in this department. It is quite voluminous, however, 
and as h.U report was based upon that testimony and the rep jrt 
of General Dana, it is believed that the foregoing will furnish 
the necessary data bearing upon the destruction of the steamer 
"Sultana." 

Respectfully submitted, 

F. C. AINSWORTH, 
Captain and Assistant Surgeon, U. S. A. 

Record and Pension Division. 
To the Honorable, the Secretary of War. 



LOSS OF THE SULTAKA. 25 



N. WINTRINGER, Chief Engineer. 

A S I was chief engineer of that ill-fated steamer at 
^~^ the time of her explosion I thought that my recol- 
lections of that terrible calamity would be of some 
interest. I believe that George Oayton, one of the 
pilots^ and myself were the only officers of the boat 
that escaped with our lives. Mr. Cayton, if still liv- 
ing, resides in St. Louis, Missouri. I have not heard 
of him for some time. The ''Sultana*' left Cairo on 
that fatal trip the 15th of April, 1865, the day after the 
death of President Lincoln, and as all wire communi- 
cations with the south were cut off at that time, the 
"Sultana" carried the news of his assassination and 
death to all points and military posts on the Missis- 
sippi river as far as New Orleans. I do not remember 
the exact date of our leaving New Orleans on our 
return trip. But on our arrival at Vicksburg, we 
were ordered to report to carry a load of paroled 
soldiers, who, I believe, were from Andersonville and 
Libby prisons. While at Vicksburg we repaired a 
boiler. Now it was claimed by some at the time that 
this boiler was not properly repaired, and that was the 
cause of the explosion. In a short time those boilers 
were recovered and the one that had been repaired at 
Vicksburg was found in good condition, whole and 
intact, and that it was one of the other three that 
caused the explosion. Now what did cause this explo- 
sion ? The explosion of the " Walker R. Carter" and 
" Missouri," in rapid succession, I think fully answers 



26 LOSS OF THE SDLTAKA. 

that question. It was the manner of the construction 
of those boilers. After these three fatal explosions 
they were taken out of all steamers using them and 
replaced with the old style of boiler. They were an 
experiment on the lower Mississippi. They had been 
used with some success on the upper Mississippi, where 
the water at all times is clear and not liable to make 
much sediment or scale. As I said before, those boil- 
ers were an experiment on the lower Mississippi, and 
had not long been in use there, and it was the opinion 
of experts that it would have been only a question of 
time for all steamers using those boilers to have gone 
the way that the ''Carter," ''Missouri," and "SuL 
tana" went, had they not have been taken out and 
replaced by others. 

I have one word to say for the engineer who was on 
duty at the time and who lost his life. It was talked 
around that he was under the influence of liquor. I 
can say for him, and all who were personally acquainted 
with him can say the same, that he was a total abstainer 
from anything of the kind. I went off watch on that 
fatal night while the boat was lying at Memphis wharf, 
at eleven o'clock in the evening of the 26th. I retired 
to my berth and did not know anything until I was 
aroused by the explosion, which occurred a few miles 
above Memphis, said to be about two o'clock in the 
morning of the 27th of April. That sight is as fresh 
in my memory today as it was twenty-one years ago, 
and I suppose to you, survivors, it is also. I stood 
bewildered for a moment, and then saw the river per- 
fectly alive yyith human beings struggling in the water, 
and the cry from all quarters was "put out the fire," 



LOSS OF THE SULTAKA. 27 

which was getting good headway by this time. But 
there was such a mass of confusion and such a com- 
plete wreck of the boat that nobody, apparently, could 
get out of the position they were in. I managed to 
get hold of a shutter and saw that the fire would soon 
force me off of the boat ; I took my chances and jumped 
into the river. I was not in the water long until I 
came across a gangway plank about thirty feet long 
and fifteen inches wide. I abandoned my shutter for 
it. I was not there long until four others kept me 
company. There was just about enough buoyancy in 
the plank to keep our heads above water, and that was 
all. We floated in that manner for about two hours 
when we lodged against a snag, when one poor fellow 
became so benumbed with cold that he could hold no 
longer and sank to rise no more. In a very short time 
after that wo were picked up by one of the relief boats 
that came from Memphis and were taken to the city. 
There was supposed to be about 2,200 people, all told, 
on the '^Sultana'' at the tim.e, of which about one- 
half were lost. I would like to attend the reunion if 
I could make it suit at the time to do so, and hear the 
experiences that will be given there. Hoping you may 
have a pleasant meeting of old friends to talk over the 
perils of that terrible night, and that not one of you may 
ever experience such another is the wish of N. Wint- 
ringer. 

[This was written April 14, 1886, and he died 
October 11, 1886.] 



28 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 



HENRY J. LYDA. 



T WAS employed on board the steamer *' Sultana," 
* but left the boat about two hours before it left St. 
Louis for New Orleans on her fatal trip. In my esti- 
mation it was carelessness on the part of the captain 
and engineer that caused the disaster. The '* Sul- 
tana's" boilers were not fit for duty, as that steamer 
stopped at Natchez and Vicksburg on the last two 
trips before the explosion to patch and repair her 
boilers. She had the tubular boilers which have been 
done away with since that time. 

My postoffice is St. Louis, Mo. I am also a member 
of Frank P. Blair Post No. 1, Department of Missouri, 
and a pensioner of the United States ; Certificate, Navy 
No. 1894, having served on the gunboat ''Essex." 



C. W. ABBADUSKA. 

T WAS born in the State of Maryland, August 15, 
1 844, and enlisted in the service of the United States 
at Waldron, Mich., August 6, 1862, in Company F, 
18th Kegiment, Mich. Vol. Inf. I was captured at 
Athens, Ala., September 24, 1864, and confined in 
the Cahaba, Ala., prison. When the "Sultana" 
exploded I was asleep on one of the hatchways and 
jumped off into the water, supposing that we were 
near the shore, but when I found out that I was mis- 
taken I got aboard the boat again and made a raft and 
went ashore on it. I was picked up about ten a. m. 

Occupation, manufacturer. Postoffice, Waldron, 
Mich. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 29 



HOSEA C. ALDRICH. 

T ENLISTED in the service of the United States in 
^ August, 1862, in Hillsdale county, Mich., as 
sergeant in Company G, of the 18th Mich. Vol. Inft. 
I was captured at Athens, Ala., the 24th of September, 
1864, and was confined in prison at Cahaba, Ala., and 
released from there April 12, 1865, and sent to Vicks- 
burg, Miss., where I went on board the boiler deck of 
the steamer *' Sultana" with the other prisoners, like a 
flock of sheep, until her passengers numbered 2,141, 
over six times her capacity. She steamed out of Vicks- 
burg, April 25, at one o'clock a. m., arrived at 
Helena, Ark., the 26th, about seven o'clock a. m., and 
arrived at Memphis, Tenn., the 26th of April at seven 
o'clock p. M. Here we stopped for a while and I went 
up town and got some refreshments, and I went back 
on the boat well fed but weary. A comrade, J. W. 
Dunsmore, and I bunked on the floor about midway on 
the cabin deck, the only place I could find as the floors 
of all the decks were completely covered when all of the 
boys laid down. We left Memphis about one o'clock 
A. M. April 27th. There was no danger manifested, and 
more than that it was not in the least anticipated only 
that the boat was heavily loaded. But in the darkness 
of that morning, between one and two o'clock opposite 
Zagleman (Tagleman) Landing, eight miles above Mem- 
phis, suddenly and without warning, the boiler of the 
steamer exploded. When it happened I was sound 
asleep, and the first thing that I knew or heard was a 
terrible crash, everything seemed to be falling. The 
things I had under my head, my shoes, and some other 



30 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

articles and specimens that I had gathered up and had 
them tied up in an old pair of drawers, they all went 
down through the floor. We scrambled back. The 
smoke came rushing up through the passage made by 
the exit of the exploded boiler. The cry from all was, 
" What is the matter ?'' and the reply came, ** the boat 
is on fire." It was all confusion. The screams of 
women and children mingled with the groans of the 
wounded and dying. Brave men rushed to and fro in 
the agony of fear, some uttering the most profane 
language and others commending their spirits to the 
Great Kuler of the Universe; the cries of the drowning 
and the roaring of the flames as they leaped heaven- 
ward made the scene most affecting and touching. But 
it was of short duration as the glare that illuminated 
the sky and made visible the awful despair of the hour 
soon died away while darkness more intense than ever 
settled down on the floating hulk and the victims of 
the disaster. I was pushed in the water and started 
for the bottom of the Mississippi, but I soon rose to the 
surface and found a small piece of board, and soon had 
the luck of getting a larger board, which was very 
lucky for me, as I could not swim. At this time a 
comrade grabbed me. I released his hold by giving 
him the small board, another comrade had got hold 
of the middle of the large board ; then there came an 
end of a ladder in my reach, I grabbed it and pulled it 
under the board, another comrade was on the other end 
of it. That was the craft which we three hung to and 
managed to keep away from others that were fighting 
and drowning. We floated along down the river nearly 
an hour I think when my limbs began to cramp; that 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 31 

was the last of which I was conscious until at eight 
o'clock A. M. We had floated down the river six miles 
and lodged in the flood-wood against an island which 
was within two miles of Memphis, and here we were 
picked up by the United States picket boat, "^Poca- 
hontas." They poured whiskey down me, rolled and 
rubbed me, and finally brought me back to life. I was 
like the new born babe, not a raveling of clothing 
upon me, in a place surrounded by persons whom I had 
never seen before, but I was happy as a lark to think I 
was rescued and saved. They placed me on the 
stretchers and carried me to the Overton hospital at 
Memphis, gave me a shirt and drawers and placed me 
in a good bunk. The third day, as soon as I was able 
to get up, they issued a suit of Uncle Sam's blues for 
mo and I was happy, without as much as a postage 
stamp, for I thought I might live so as to tell the story 
to friends at home, and I am glad that I have the op- 
portunity to give this short and hasty sketch. I was 
discharged from the service of the United States at 
Jackson, Mich., July 1865. [Now deceased.] 



DANIEL ALLEN. 

T WAS born at Fair Garden, Tenn., on the 7th of 
* September, 1843. I enlisted in the service of the 
United States in Sevier county, Tenn., a private in 
Company K of the 3d Tenn. Cavalry, October 8, 1863. 
Was captured by the rebels at Athens, Ala., September 
24, 1864, and was confined in Cahaba prison until 
March 16, 1865, when I was paroled, — reaching parole 



32 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

camp near Vicksburg, March 21, and was ordered to 
parole headquarters at Camp Chase. Bat before reach- 
ing that place the sad event took place which calls for 
this narration. My escape and rescue from the illfated 
vessel were attended with much interest and excite- 
ment. The first I knew of the terrible disaster I was 
awakened, while in the stern of the lower deck, by the 
cry *' she's sinking," and the shrieks and cries of the 
wounded and the terror stricken comrades. I pressed 
toward the bow, passing many wounded sufferers, who 
piteously begged to be thrown overboard. I saw men, 
while attempting to escape, pitch down through the 
hatchway that was full of blue curling flimes, or rush 
wildly from the vessel to death and destruction in the 
turbid waters below. I clambered upon the hurricane 
deck and with calmness and self-possession assisted 
others to escape. At length, realizing that there was 
but little time to be lost, I divested myself of all cloth- 
ing, and throwing a plank out, jumped into the water 
sixteen feet below. I was at once grappled by two 
drowning men who held on to me until I climbed into 
the bow of the boat to release myself from their hold. 
I then descended the cable and made for the Arkansas 
shore. I was in the water five hours, when I was 
picked up by a lifeboat. I was taken to the hospital 
at Memphis, Tenn., where I remained a day or two 
and then went to Camp Chase, Ohio. I was discharged 
from the service at Nashville, Tenn., June 10, 1865. 

My occupation at present is that of a farmer and 
stockdealer. My present postoffice is Allensville, 
Tenn. 



LOSS OF THE SULTAKA. S3 

HIRAM ALLISON. 

T WAS born in Franklin county, Pa., December 4, 
^ 1830, and enlisted in the service of the United 
States at Muncie, Ind., December 1863, in Company 
G, 9th Ind. Cavalry. Was captured at Sulphur Trestle, 
La., September 25, 1864, and confined in the Castle 
Morgan prison at Cahaba, Ala., until March, and then 
was taken to be exchanged at Big Black river, Miss. 
I got on the boat "Sultana'* at Vicksburg. She 
was crowded to her utmost capacity. Arrived at 
Memphis April 26, in the evening, where she discharged 
a lot of freight. Some of the boys went up town, but 
I staid aboard. As near as 1 can tell we left about 
twelve or one o'clock that night. I was on the hurri- 
cane deck, close to the wheel house, lying down, and 
was just beginning to doze, when, all at once, I heard 
the crash. I jumped up the first thing, and saw a 
great hole torn through the hurricane deck and 
fire coming through. I stood a few minutes and 
looked at my surroundings. I concluded to take to 
the water. I climbed down from the hurricane deck 
to the cabin deck and took off all my clothes but my 
drawers and shirt, and then glanced around the burn- 
ing wreck and saw that I would have to go, so I 
jumped from the cabin deck into the water. I re- 
mained there for two or three hours and then came 
across a horse trough with a comrade on each end of 
it. I took the center. When I caught up with the 
two comrades they were both praying. When I got 
on with them I said: ''That was a terrible disaster." 
They made no reply but kept right on praying. I said 
no more to them and when it was light enough for mi 
5 



34 LOSS OF THE SULTAI^A. 

to see they were gone. What became of them I never 
knew. I stayed on the trough till I got to some brush 
and logs on the Arkansas side ; then I bid it good bye 
about five miles from the ill-fated '^Sultana." I was 
taken to Memphis with others. I was put in the Over- 
ton hospital, remained there a few days, and then 
turned my face homeward. I was scalded on my legs 
and cut on the head. 

Postoffice address is Muncie, Delaware county, Ind. 
Occupation, carpenter and joiner. 



CEORCE ANDERSON. 

T WAS born in Wayne county, Ohio, on the 20th of 
^ July, 1838. I enlisted in the service of the United 
States, August 6, 1862, in Wayne county, Ohio, in 
Company F, 102d Regiment Ohio Infantry, and never 
missed any duty from the time of enlistment up to the 
time of being captured. A small detachment of our 
regiment was sent to reinforce our troops at Athens, 
Ala., in the fight there against Forrest's command. 
We were taken prisoners September 25, 1864, and 
taken to the prison at Oahaba, where we remained 
until March 16, 1865, when there was an exchange of 
prisoners and we were sent to Vicksburg, Miss., where 
we went on board the steamer ** Sultana *' which was 
to take us up the river to Cairo, 111. When we arrived 
at Memphis, Tenn., two of my comrades and myself 
got off and went up into the city, and while there, I 
can assure you, I did not expect to be there in the 
morning. Got on board the steamer again ; on the hur- 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 35 

ricane deck, near the pilot house, my two com- 
rades and myself bunked for the night under one 
blanket. We were asleep at the time of the explosion. 
I was thrown out of reach of anybody and saw nothing 
of my comrades after the explosion. I swam about in 
the water for a time, and finally got a piece of railing 
that was thrown from the boat and stuck to that and 
floated down the river with Mr. Horn from Wooster, 
and two others, (their names I have never learned,) 
two miles below Memphis, making in all nine miles. 
We were picked up by a gunboat and put on board a 
steamer that was anchored there for that purpose. 
When taken out of the water I found that I was hurt 
in the left shoulder and breast, and I feel it to this 
day. I was taken to Memphis where I remained a few 
days and then was sent to Columbus, Ohio, where I 
remained a short time and was discharged from the 
service and sent home. 

I now reside near Seville, Medina county, Ohio. 
My present occupation is farming. 



P. S. ATCHLEY. 

T WAS born in Sevier county, Tenn., on the 12th of 
^ December, 1842. Enlisted in the service of the 
United States atKnoxville, Tenn., on the 5th of No- 
vember, 1862, as a corporal in Company K, of the 3rd 
Regiment of Tennessee Volunteers. Was on duty at the 
battle of Athens, Ala, when the confederate forces, 
under the command of Gen. N. B. Forrest captured that 
place, and we were immediately transported to Cahaba, 



36 LOSS OF THE SULTAKA. ' 

Ala., as prisoners of war, and remained there, in close 
confinement, for about six months, when we were 
paroled out on the 3 6th of March, 1865, and sent to 
Vicksburg, Miss., where we went on board the ill-fated 
steamer ^'Sultana." We were highly elated with the 
thoughts of going home and seeing loved ones, when 
suddenly, as we were a few miles above Memphis, 
Tenn., one of her boilers exploded and hundreds of 
souls were ushered into eternity. My experience on 
that terrible morning no pen can write nor tongue can 
tell. I was thrown into the surging waves of that 
mighty river, into the jaws of death, and life depended 
on one grand effort, expert swimming, which I did 
successfully, and after swimming six or seven miles, 
according to statements given by citizens living on the 
banks of the river, landed on the Arkansas shore with- 
out any assistance whatever. There I found a confed- 
erate soldier who came to my relief, and took me to a 
house near by, and gave me something to eat, and I felt 
something like myself again, thanks to the Great Ruler 
of the Universe. The said confederate soldier worked 
hard to save the lives of the drowning men, and brought 
to shore in his little dugout about fifteen of them. A 
number of comrades got out at the point where I did. 
Among them were some Ohio men for whom I have 
great respect (but have lost their names), especially 
one of the 24th Ohio Regiment, that got out of the 
water at the same time I did. I gave him my blouse 
and slips as he was naked ; if he is yet living I would 
like to hear from him. I will close by wishing God to 
bless every survivor. 

My present occupation is farming. Present post- 
office address. Trotter's Store, Tenn. 



LOSS OF THE SULTAN^A. 37 

MURRY S. BAKER. 

T WAS born in Canton, Wayne county, Mich<, and 
* enlisted in the service of the United States, at 
Plymouth, Wayne county, Mich., 24th day of July, 
1862, in CoQipany D, 4th Michigan Cavalry. Was cap- 
tured September 30, 1864, and confined in the Cahaba, 
Ala., prison. In the spring of 1865 I was taken to 
Big Black river and turned over to the "Yanks.'* I 
did not keep a diary and cannot remember details. 
After lying in camp awhile we were taken to Vicks- 
burg and put on board the '^Sultana.'* I tried to get 
close to the boiler, but it was full there, so I laid 
down by the stern door, beside Frank Nevins, of the 
18th Regiment, Michigan Volunteers, and another 
comrade of the 25th Regiment Michigan Volun- 
teer?, (he was lost). I sat up till 12 o'clock, 
cooking rations, and then laid down and went 
to sleep. How long I had been sleeping I do 
not know. I was awakened by the explosion and 
sprang to my feet and looked around ; some one said the 
boat was sinking ; I went out on the stern and saw that 
it was not, and so went back. It was one of the worst 
sights I ever witnessed. Men who were scalded and 
bruised were crawling over one another to get out of 
the fire. I went to the side of the boat and pulled 
a board off to help me get ashore with, but a big 
" Yank" grabbed it away from me. Then I got another 
off from a bunk and went down to the wheelhouse and 
threw it in the water, and then jumped after it. My 
limbs cramped, but I kept paddling. I tried to get to 
one side of the shore, but could not, then I tried the 
other side, and by hard work I got on some flood-wood. 



38 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 



When I reached it I was about exhausted and could 
not speak and laid there until I was rescued. Was dis- 
charged at Detroit, 28th of June, 1865. 

Occupation farming. Postoffice address, Williams- 
ton, Ingham county, Mich. 




OTTO BARDON. 

T WAS born in Wooster, 
Wayne county, Ohio, Au- 
gust 28, 1841, and enlisted in 
the service of the United 
States, at Wooster, Ohio, 
August 8, 1862, in Company 
) H, of the 102d Ohio Volunteer 
,:) Infantry, just in time to take 
part in protecting Cincinnati 
from being destroyed by 
Kirby Smith. Was then sent to Louisville, Ky., 
against Gen. Bragg and followed him through the State 
of Kentucky 375 miles; back to Bowling Green for 
winter quarters, which were cold corn-stalk camps, for 
we had no tents that winter of 1862 and 1863. .On 
Christmas eve of 1862 we recaptured Clarksonville, 
Tenn., on the Cumberland river. In the fall of 1863 
we were sent to guard the Chattanooga railroad, then 
back to Nashville, Tenn. In the spring of 1864 we were 
sent to guard the Tennessee river, and in August 
1864, we were sent after Gen. Wheeler along the 
Chattanooga railroad and drove him across the Ten- 
nessee river. From here we went to Decatur, Ala., and 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 39 

on September 24, 1864, a detail was made, at one o'clock 
at night, consisting of 250 of the 102d Ohio regiment, 
and 150 of the 18th Michigan regiment, to go to Athens 
and see what was the matter. We got within five miles 
of Athens when we met Gen. Forrest's whole brigade. 
We drove him five miles and fought with him for three 
hours, when we found that we were surrounded and out 
of powder. In a charge we lost our best officers and 
were out of ammunition. We had to surrender on the 
24th of September, 1864. We were sent to Cahaba, 
Ala., where we were held as prisoners until the latter 
part of March, 1865, when we were taken out on 
account of the high water, the Alabama river having 
risen so high that we were waist deep in water for five 
days. The rebels sent us to Vicksburg, where we 
remained in parole camp. While here we heard of the 
sad news of the assassination of President Lincoln by a 
rebel. The prisoners became wild with indignation 
and started for the rebel head-quarters. The rebel 
major that had charge of us fled across the Big Black 
river bridge for safety until we learned the particulars 
of the President's death. We were put on the steamer, 
"Sultana." About 2,400 men were on their way to 
*' God's country," as we called the North, and we all 
felt happy to know that we were on our way home and 
that the war was over (hallelujah. Amen). On the 
morning of April 27, 1865, I was in the engine room of 
of the steamer sound asleep, lying by the side of the 
hatch-hole with seven others of my regiment, when the 
explosion took place. First a terrific explosion, then 
hot steam, smoke, pieces of brick-bats and chunks of 
coal came thick and fast. I gasped for breath. A fire 



40 LOSS OF THE SULTAl^TA. 

broke out that lighted up the whole river. I stood at 
this hatch-hole to keep comrades from falling in, for the 
top was blown off by the explosion. I stood here until 
the fire compelled me to leave. I helped several out of 
this place. I saw Jonas Huntsberger and John Baney 
go to the wheel-house, then I started in the same direc- 
tion. I tried to get a large plank, but this was too 
heavy, so I left it and got a small board and started to 
the wheel to jump into the water. Here a young man 
said to me, *'you jump first, I cannot swim." This 
man had all of his clothes on. I had just my shirt 
and pants on. I said to him, **you must paddle your 
own canoe, I can't help you." Then I jumped and 
stuck to my board. I went down so far that I 
let go of my board and paddled to get on top of the 
water. I strangled twice before I reached the top ; 
then the young man caught me and he strangled me 
twice. By this time I was about played out. 1 then 
reached the wheel, and clung to it until I tore off all 
of my clothes, with the intention of swimming with 
one hand. I looked around and recognized Fritz 
Saunders, of ray regiment, by my side. I said, ^' Saun- 
ders, here is a door under the wheel, let us get it out." 
We got it out and found it had glass panels in it. 
I said, "let this go, here is a whole door." The rest 
on the wheel took the first door and we started after 
them with the other. We had not more than started 
when a man swam up and laid across the center of our 
door. I looked back and saw the wheel-house fall — it 
had burned off and fell over. If we had remained there 
one minute longer it would have buried us in the fire. 
I said to Saunders, "let's go to the right, it is nearer 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 41 

to shore.' ^ He replied, ^'no, there is a boat; I will 
paddle for it.'* And when we were in the center of the 
river the steamer was about out of sigjht. We met 
three young men clinging to a large trunk; they 
grasped our door for us to steer them into the timber. 
We had not gone far until these bore too much weight 
on our door; that put us all under the water. I gave 
the trunk a kick and raised on the door and brought 
it to the surface of the water. Then I said, ''boys if 
you don't keep your weight off of the door, then you 
must steer the trunk yourseUes." By this time I was 
cold and benumbed and was in a sinking condition, but 
having presence of mind I reached and got my board 
and called aloud to God for help. I rubbed my arms 
and got the blood in circulation again. Soon we were 
among the timber on the "Hen and Chickens" island, 
clinging to trees, but being too cold and benumbed to 
climb a tree. I had the good luck of finding saplings 
under the water. I put my foot in the fork and raised 
myself out of the water. I soon got warm and swam 
to a larger tree, and clung to it, but was not there very 
long until I got so cold that I fell from the tree into 
the water. I swam to the same tree and clung to it 
and called aloud to God for His assistance. I saw a man 
break open this trunk, it contained only ladies' dresses 
so it was no help to us. One of these men that had 
clung to the trunk was so cold that he drowned with 
his arms around a tree. We were on these trees until 
about nine o'clock A. m. It seemed as if the gnats and 
mosquitoes would eat us alive. We were rescued by a 
steamer sent in search of us from Memphis. The cap- 
tain of the steamer that picked us up, ordered hot coffee 



42 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

and whiskey (you bet we took it) ; and the Christian 
commission furnished us under-clothing, and the third 
day "Uncle Sam" gave us a suit of clothes, free. On 
the fourth day we took a steamer for Cairo, and were 
sent from here to Camp Chase and discharged May 
21, 1865. 

Present occupation, carriage trimmer, and post- 
oflBce, Wooster, Ohio. 



WM. BARNES. 

T WAS born in the present State of West Virginia, 
^ June 15, 1842, and enlisted in the service of the 
United States in Athens county, Ohio, April 22, 
1861, in Company H, 22nd Regiment Ohio Volunteers. 
I was captured at Decatur, Ga., July 22, 1864, and 
confined most of the time at Andersonville, Ga. At 
the time the '^ Sultana" blew up I was thrown from 
the boiler deck and very badly hurt, but was fortunate 
enough, with three unknown comrades, to get hold of 
a bale of hay, upon which we floated till nearly opposite 
the city of Memphis, where we were picked up by a 
boat. 

My present occupation is. that of a miner, and my 
postofiBce address is Nelsonville, Ohio. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 43 

GEORGE BEMENT. 

T WAS born in Mason, Cass county, Mich., November 
* 6, 1841, and enlisted in the service of the United 
States at Adamsville, Mich., August 3, 1862, in Com- 
pany F, 25th Eegiment Michigan Volunteers, and was 
captured at Cedar BluJffs, on the Coosa river, Ala. 
October 10th. I was confined first at Selma, and after- 
wards at Castle Morgan, Cahaba, Ala. As to my 
experience on board the '* Sultana," about all I can 
say is that I got very wet and quite cold. I reached 
shore somehow all right. 

My present occupation is farming, and my post- 
office address is Adamsville, Mich. 




CHESTER D. BERRY. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 45 

P"HESTEK D. BERRY, born August 1, 1844, at 
^-^ South Creek, Bradford county. Pa. Removed, 
when ten years old to Michigan, thence to Minnesota, 
and bacji again to Michigan. Enlisted August 18, 
1862, at Marshall, Mich., in Company I, 20th Regiment, 
Michigan Volunteer Infantry. Served with that organi- 
zation in all its campaigns, except Fredericksburg at 
which time I had typhoid fever, until I was captured 
June 2, 1862, at Cold Harbor, Va., and taken to Pera- 
berton building, Richmond, Va., where I was confined 
for a while then taken to Andersonville, Ga., arriving 
there June 16, 1864. Here the rations, which at first 
were small enough, kept diminishing, until the 1st of 
September, 1864, there were but two tablespoonsful of 
very coarse corn meal, the same of stock peas, with 
about two ounces of fresh beef, and wood enough to 
about half cook the rations. The beef first, then the 
peas were eaten raw and the meal made into a gruel 
and drank. About the last days of October, 1864, we 
were removed to Millen, Ga., thence to Savannah and 
down the railroad to Blackshear Station. Were kept 
here in the woods with a heavy guard around us for 
about two weeks, then taken to what was at the time 
the end of the railroad at Thomasville, Ga. Were kept 
here about two weeks then marched across the country 
sixty miles to Albany, Ga., there put on board the cars 
and taken back to Andersonville, entering the prison 
the second time on Christmas eve, 1864. Here we re- 
mained, with scarcely a ray of hope, till the 25th day 
of March, 1865, when we were put on board the cars, 
taken to Montgomery, there transferred by boat to 
Selma, thence by rail to Meridian. Here we were kept 



46 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

over night, where my pocket diary for 1864 was stolen 
from me. In it I had recorded the exact amount and 
kind of rations drawn for every day while in prison. 
From Meridian we were taken to Jackson, Miss., then 
marched across the country to the Big Black river, 
crossing it on the 1st day of April, 1865, lacking one 
day of ten months that I had been in the hands of the 
confederate authorities — and I could not say yet that I 
was out of their hands, for we were put into a camp 
called " Camp Fisk," which is four miles from Vicks- 
burg, and were under a confederate major, but fed, 
clothed, and sheltered by "Uncle Samuel." We 
understood at the time, and I do still, that our govern- 
ment had made a proposition to the confederate au- 
thorities that if they would remove their prisoners on 
to neutral ground, they might still have control of them, 
but our government would feed, clothe and shelter us. 
I never experienced a happier day in my life than I did 
when we marched under the old Stars and Stripes at 
the Big Black river railroad bridge and drew my first 
cup of coffee and a single hard tack. It looked like a 
stingy way for "Uncle Sam" to do business, but the 
boys who served us told us that when the first squad of 
prisoners arrived that they (the cooks) kicked open the 
boxes of hard-tack among them, just as they had been 
in the habit of doing among themselves, and the result 
was that there was a number of deaths before night ; 
so we were happy with our meager rations, finding 
more joy in looking up at the old flag, that we loved 
so dearly, than in anything else, and it seemed to us 
that the All-Wise Ruler had gotten up a bit of sunshine 
and a small breeze in order that we might see that 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 47 

glorious emblem of liberty proudly unfold itself and 
kiss the sunshine. I have seen many beautiful things 
in my life, but never anything that looked more beau- 
tiful than the flag of my country did upon that 1st day 
of April, 1865. We remained at "Camp Fisk" for 
about twenty days, then 1,965 prisoners who had been 
exchanged were placed on board the*' Sultana," where 
there were already a number of passengers and thirty- 
five exchanged officers, the entire number of persons 
being a little over 2,300. You will notice that the 
number of prisoners, officers, and men was just 2,000. 
I understood at the time, and have had no reason to 
change my mind, that it was a contrived plan with the 
United States' quartermaster at Yicksburg and the 
captain of the boat. I will explain : At the fall of 
Vicksburg Gen. Grant gave many of his men furloughs 
to go home and recruit themselves after their unusually 
hard service. The officers of the steamers, knowing 
that the men would pay almost any price, charged 
exorbitant rates of fare to Cairo, 111. The men paid 
what was charged, but, just before the boats started. 
Gen. Grant learned what had been done. He at once 
sent an officer to tie up the boats and ordered that all 
but $5 from each private and $10 from each commis- 
sioned officer be refunded. The government adopted 
that rule, and whenever troops were sent by private 
boats they were allowed $5 per man for transportation. 
There were a number of boats at Vicksburg at the time 
we (the exchanged prisoners) were to be sent north, 
but all demanded the $5 per man and would take but 
1,000 men. Finally the quartermaster succeeded in 
persuading the captain of the ''Sultana" to take the 



48 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

entire 2,000 at 13 per head, that would give him $6,000 
for the trip, whereas^ if he only took 1,000 at $5 he 
would only make $5,000. The report said that the 
captain of the ''Sultana'^ signed the papers for $10,- 
000, and that the quartermaster cashed them on the 
spot for $6,000. How true that was I cannot tell, but 
I know it was believed among the men at the time. 
All went gay as a marriage bell for awhile. A happier 
lot of men I think I never saw than those poor fellows 
were. The most of them had been a. long time in 
prison, some even for about two years, and the pros- 
pect of soon reaching home made them content to 
endure any amount of crowding. I know that on the 
lower deck we were just about as thick as we could 
possibly lie all over the deck, and I understood that all 
the other decks were the same. The main thought 
that occupied every mind was home, the dearest spot 
on earth. I well remember, as the boat lay at Memphis 
unloading over one hundred hogsheads of sugar from 
her hold, that my thoughts not only wended north- 
ward, but I put them ia practical shape. The Chris- 
tian commission had given me a hymn book. At the 
time I left home the song '' Sweet Hour of Prayer " 
was having quite a run. I found this, and bofore 
the darkness had stopped me in the evening I had com- 
mitted those words to memory and sang them for the 
boys, little dreaming how soon I should have to test 
the power of prayer as well as the hour when it was 
held. The last that I remembered that evening was 
that the boat was taking on coal, across the river from 
Memphis, preparatory to going up the river. There 
had been considerable talk among the boys, that it 



LOSS OF THPJ SULTANA. 49 

would be a grand opportunity for guerillas. If they 
only knew that there was such a boat-load of prisoners 
coming up the river, how they could plant a battery on 
the shore, sink the boat, and destroy nearly if not all 
of the prisoners on board; consequently, when the 
terrific explosion took place, and I was awakened from 
a sound sleep by a stick of cord wood striking me on 
the head and fracturing my skull, the first thought I 
had was that, while the boat lay at Memphis, some one 
had gone up the river and prepared such a reception 
for us, and what had only been a talh was now 
a realization. I lay low for a moment, when the hot 
water soaking through my blanket made me think 
I had better move. I sprang to the bow of the boat, 
and turning I looked back upon one of the most 
terrible scenes I ever beheld. The upper decks of the 
boat were a complete wreck, and the dry casings 
of the cabins falling in upon the hot bed of coal 
was burning like tinder. A few pailsful of water 
would have put the fire out, but alas, it was ten feet to 
the water and there was no rope to draw with, conse- 
quently the flimes swept fiercely up and back through 
the light wood of the upper decks. 

I had often read of burning vessels and nights of 
horror on the deep, and almost my first thought was, 
"now, take in the scene," but self-preservation stood 
out strongest. I wont back to where I had lain and 
found my bunk mate, Busley, scalded to death; I then 
secured a piece of cabin door casing, about three or 
four inches wide and about four feet long, then going 
back to the bow of the boat I came to the conclusion I 
did not want to take to the water just then, for it was 
7 



50 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

literally black with human beings, many of whom were 
sinking and taking others with them. Being a good 
swimmer, and having board enough to save me, even if 
I were not, I concluded to wait till the rush was over. 

The horrors of that night will never be effaced 
from my memory — such swearing, praying, shouting 
and crying I had never heard ; and much of it from the 
same throat — imprecations followed by petitions to the 
Almighty, denunciations by bitter weeping. I stood 
still and watched for a while, then began wandering 
around to other parts of the boat when I came across 
one man who was weeping bitterly and wringing his 
hands as if in terrible agony, continually crying, *' 
dear, dear." I supposed the poor fellow was 
seriously hurt. My sympathies were aroused at once. 
Approaching him, I took him by the shoulder and 
asked where he was hurt. **I'm not hurt at all,'' he 
said, "but I can't swim, I've got to drown, dear." 
I bade him be quiet, then showing him my little board 
I said to him, '^ there, do you see that; now you go to 
that pile of broken deck and get you one like it, and 
when you jump into the water put it under your chin 
and you can't drown." '* But I did get one," said he, 
*'and some one snatched it away from me." ''Well 
then, get another," said I. "I did," said he, ''and 
they took that away from me." '' Well, then," said I, 
"get another." " Why," said he, "what would be 
the use, they would take it from me. dear, I tell 
you there is no use; I've got to drown, I can't swim." 
By this time I was thoroughly disgusted, and giving 
him a shove, I said, "drown then you fool." 

I want to say to you, gentle reader, I have been sorry 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 51 

all these years for that very act. There was little or no 
rush for the water at that time and had I given my 
board to that poor fellow, then conducted him to the 
edge of the boat and seen him safely overboard, he 
might, perhaps, have escaped, while, as it was, I have 
no doubt that he was drowned. If he was not, and 
should ever see this, I wish he would write me the fact. 
But some one may ask, *' what would you have done 
without your board?" I could have got another from 
the pile of rubbish, which would have been a very easy 
matter, and I have not the faintest idea that anyone 
would have tried to take it from me, for, as the boys 
tell about, "I was not built that way.'* 

After looking at the burning boat as long as I cared 
to, and as the waters were comparatively clear of men, 
I sprang overboard and struck out for some willows 
that I could see by the light of the burning boat, they 
appearing to be about one-half mile distant. I had 
gone but about twenty or thirty rods when, hearing a 
crash of breaking timbers, I looked back. The wheel- 
house or covering for the wheel, (it was a side-wheel 
steamer,) had broken away partially from the hurricane 
deck, and a poor fellow had been in the act of stepping 
from the hurricane deck onto the wheel house. I pre- 
sume it was then the hurricane deck fell in. When it 
reached an angle of about forty-five degrees it stopped, 
for some unaccountable reason, till it nearly burned 
up. He succeeded in reaching the wheel house but 
got no further, for it broke and let him part way 
through, then held him, as in an iron vice, till he 
burned to death, and even now, after the lapse of years, 
it almost seems as though I could hear the poor fel- 



52 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

low's screams, as the forked flames swept around him. 
I then turned and pressed forward towards my haven 
of safety, but soon became aware that I was not gain- 
ing upon it. The fact was, I was swimming toward a 
small island and was, in fact, now swimming up stream 
but was not aware of the truth. The icy water was 
fast telling upon my weak system, and the moment I 
became aware that I was being carried away from the 
timber instead of gaining it I became completely dis- 
couraged, the only time I think in my life. 

Being now quite despondent, I had about concluded 
that there was no use of my trying to save myself, that I 
would drown in spite of my efforts ; and that to throw my 
board away and sink at once would be only to shorten 
my misery. I was just in the act of doing so when it 
seemed to me that I was transported for the moment 
to "the old house at home," and that I was wending 
my way slowly up the path from the road gate to the 
house, but, strange for me, when I reached the door, 
instead of entering at once, I sat upon the step. My 
mother was an earnest devoted Christian, also my 
father had been, but father was deaf and dumb con- 
sequently the family devotions fell to mother, and I 
knew that in the years of my home life, that if one of 
the family were away from home during the hour for 
prayer, nine o'clock in the evening, that one was 
especially remembered in the prayer. As I sat upon 
the step I thought it was nine o'clock in the evening, 
and as plainly as I ever heard my mother's voice I 
heard it that evening. I cared but little for the prayer 
until she reached that portion that referred to the ab- 
sent one, when all the mother-soul seemed to go up 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 63 

in earnest petition — '' God save my boy." For ten 
long weary months she had received no tidings from 
her soldier boy, now she had just learned that he was 
on his way home and her thoughts were almost con- 
stantly upon him ; and for him her earnest prayer was 
made. I fiercely clutched the board and hissed be- 
tween my now firmly set teeth ^''Mother, by the help 
of God, your prayer shall be answered.'' I started out 
for a grand effort. 

Just then I heard a glad cry from the burning boat 
and looking around discovered that past the boat, 
down the river, two or three miles as near as I could 
judge, was the bow light of a gun-boat. I turned and 
was now obliged to swim past the burning boat, for I 
was up the river about eighty rods above it; when 
nearly past the boat, which I kept a safe distance to 
my left, I ran into the top of a tree that had caved off 
from the bank and whose roots were now fast in the 
bed of the stream, upon which I climbed and was 
nearly asleep when a number of men from the boat 
came along and climbed upon it also. Their united 
weight sank it low into the water, whose icy coldness 
coming upon my body again awakened me. Then, to 
more fully arouse me, a man got hold of my board 
and tried to take it away from me. I remonstrated 
with him, but he claimed the board belonged to 
him and that I was trying to steal it. This fully 
aroused me — it was the straw that broke the camel's 
back. Giving the board a quick jerk I sprang back- 
ward and went swimming down the stream on my 
back, holding my board high least I might lose it. I 
soon turned over and proceeded more slowly. I began 



54 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

again to have an almost irresistible feeling of drowsi- 
ness. I was cold and sleepy. Just then I came across, 
or thought I did, a dry black ash sapling about two 
and one-half or three inches in diameter at the butt and 
six or eight feet long, that pronged in two branches 
about three feet from the butt end. I put this with 
my board and trying them found they would float. I 
then gave myself up to sleep and did not awake until 
long after sunrise. I then stool upon a large snag in 
the river that was pronged or forked something like 
1 imagined the black ash sapling was in the night. I 
stood on the lower prong which was about a foot under 
water, while the upper prong was nearly two feet above 
the water, and, what to me was stranger than all, I had, 
instead of the little board four inches wide and about 
four feet long, a two inch plank about four inches 
wide and about six feet long. 

I was out of my head and imagined that some ter- 
rible danger threatened me, but if I could only get that 
plank upon the upper prong of the snag, all would be 
safe. I soon came too enough to know that I was 
working a useless scheme; then I realized that it was 
worse than useless as it would take some of my strength 
to hold the plank on the snag while it would do me no 
good whatever. I then abandoned the project and be- 
gan to cry with the pain of my fractured skull, but I 
soon stopped that also, saying to myself, crying does 
not ease pain. Then came the first clear thought of 
the morning and I realized what had happened and 
that I was but about five rods from the woods upon the 
Arkansas shore, the shore itself being under water. 

Qaickly shoving my plank into the water and 



LOSS OF THE SULTAKA 55 

starting for the place where the shore ought to be, 
which was the most foolish move of all, for when I 
arrived there and had palled myself up a small cotton- 
wood tree I was surrounded by a perfect swarm of buf- 
falo gnats, which made lively work for me, and 
although I had firmly seated myself upon a limb of 
the tree and employed both hands with bushes whipping 
them off my neck and breast — the only parts that were 
exposed — which were a solid blotch in less than an hour. 
Had I remained on a snag in the river I would have 
been free from the gnats and nearer passing steamers, 
by which I hoped to be carried away. I remained in 
this tree but a short time, parhaps an hour or more, 
when the steamer " Pocahontas " came along, picking 
up all the men they could find. 

I soon attracted attention and was taken on board 
the steamer, and soon after landed at Memphis and 
was then taken to Washington hospital, where my 
wound was poorly dressed, as I remember it, none of 
the broken pieces of skull being taken out. I remained 
here a little over a week, and although I gave my name, 
company and regiment to a reporter, and also to the 
hospital steward, yet about two or three months after- 
ward my mother received official notice from Wash- 
ington that her son was killed upon the '-Sultana;" 
and my name stands today upon the Michigan Adju- 
tant General's Keport for 1865 as killed by the explo- 
sion of the steamer "Sultana." Yet, when in after 
years, I applied for a pension for that fractured 
skull, which was so bad that the surgeon at Washing- 
ton hospital told the man in the next bunk to mine 
that I could never get well, I was obliged to prove 



56 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

that I was upon the " Sultana" and that I was hurt or 
had my skull fractured at that time. Such is the ease 
with which pensions are procured, and such the liber- 
ality of the government officials when they have the 
official evidence in government reports before them. 

After my brief sojourn in Memphis, I, with others, 
was placed on the steamer '' Belle Memphis " and 
taken to Ca,iro, remaining there over night, thence via 
Matoon, where we were obliged to wait a few hours for 
cars. Here I was obliged to go hungry, or beg from 
the citizens, although I had a meal ticket at the eating 
house given nie by the Christian commission, but the 
landlord refused to honor it. From here we were 
taken to Indianapolis where another halt was made, then 
onto Columbus, when I was sent to Tripler hospital and 
doctored up for about two weeks ; then sent to Jackson, 
Mich., to be mustered out of the United States service 
on special telegraphic order from the War Department. 

My present occupation is Minister of the Gospel. 
Postoffice address, Tekonsha, Mich. 



WM. BOOR. 

T WAS born in Cumberland county, Pa., January 20, 
^ 1825. Enlisted in the service of the United States 
October 5, 1864, as a private in Company D, of the 
64th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, at Sandusky, 
Ohio. Was captured at Franklin, Tenn., November 
30, 1864, and confined in prison at Meridian, Miss., 
Cahaba and Selma, Ala. I was finally released from 
prison and sent to Vicksburg, Miss., arriving there 



LOSS OF THE StJLTAN-A. 57 

March 19, 1865. Remained in camp until the 22nd of 
April, I think, when we received orders to break camp 
and be ready for our homeward journey. The train 
from Vicksburg came on time. The Ohio men were 
first called, and, responding promptly, were taken 
aboard the train and landed at Vicksburg. We were 
then ordered to fall into line and march aboard the 
steamer "Sultana.'' When going on board my atten- 
tion was attracted by the noise and work at the boilers 
going on at that time. We were marched to the hurri- 
cane deck and informed that this was to be our place 
of abode, but I thought different. I turned to Com- 
rade Wm. A Hulit, and, asking him to take charge of 
our clothing which I had at the time, I went below and 
looked at the boilers, which were not very favorable to 
my mind. I went back to the boys, told them that we 
had better look for some other place and that I thought 
that there was danger; and if the boat should blow up 
and we were on that deck we would go higher than a 
kite. We started for the deck below, taking our position 
at the head of the stairway. Six of us took our places 
here, and enjoyed ourselves the best we could consid- 
ering the crowded condition of the boat, all looking 
ahead to the happy time when we should reach home 
to see our loved ones. 

While thus apparently everything was moving along 
smoothly and safely, if not to our comfort, in the still- 
ness of night on the morning of April 27, 1865, about 
two o'clock, we were awakened by the exploding of the 
boiler of the boat, the cracking of timbers, wailing of 
men and the screams and moaning from the wounded, 
and the frantic men rushing to and fro, not knowing 



58 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

what to do, while the flames were madly rushing 
through the broken kindling of the boat cabin. It soon 
cleared the boat of its human freight. When the ex- 
plosion occurred we all, except one, rushed out from 
under the wreck. Comrade Thos. Brink was fastened in 
the wreck. I commenced clearing away the broken tim- 
bers that were about him and got him out. We went 
down stairs ; I asked him if he could swim, he said, 
*'yes, I can swim," and I told him I could not swim, 
but would meet him somewhere on the shore. I was 
not, however, permitted to realize that happy event 
but was forced to the painful thought that he had 
perished, and the gallant Thos. Brink was no more. 
After I parted with my friend on the bow of the boat 
I went up stairs and got in under the wreck of the 
cabin roof. There I dressed, and took my rubber 
blanket and a spare shirt and tied them up, expecting 
if the board could carry me it also could carry my 
clothing, for I thought they would come good after 
having been in the icy cold water for a few hours. 

Now, I thought that I was prepared for any event 
that might overtake me. I went down on the boiler 
deck. While there I had a good view for quite a dis- 
tance around the burning boat. It was a most distress- 
ing scene to see hundreds of men in the water pleading 
for help, clinching one another while they would hold 
on to each other — going down by the dozens at a time. 
At the same time I wonder how so many were saved as 
were, laboring under so many disadvantages, hundreds 
of them being thrown into the air as soon as the ex- 
plosion took place, — scarcely having time to awake out 



LOSS OP THE SULTANA. 59 

of sleep, — and plunged into the water which was almost 
icy cold. 

The time for me to escape was now at hand for the fire 
was sweeping through the stairway. I had taken a 
survey of the river and made for the side which I 
thought was nearest the shore. Comrade Crawford of 
the 102d Regiment, and I started for the same place. At 
my saying to him we would have to leave he led the 
way, and I waited until the way was clear again. While 
waiting, my bundle caught fire, and, as I struck the 
water, I heard a hissing noise caused by the water com- 
ing in contact with the fire. Here I met with an acci- 
dent which came near proving fatal to me. I got into 
one of those whirl-pools in the water, and while there 
I could not manage my board. I finally got tired out, 
and then for the first time I thought I must give up 
the struggle and drown as I could not get away from 
there. I finally concluded to dive to the bottom and 
get a good start not thinking that the water was forty 
or fifty feet deep in the channel. I went down but it 
was not long before I was in need of the fresh air. 
When I came near the surface of the water, as luck 
would have it, I cleared the pool and got my board. I 
rested a short time and made up my mind to 
get to the wheel-house of the boat and get 
on it and stay there until picked up, or go 
down with the burning boat, but in trying to get 
there I came across a board about eight feet long. I 
put my other board under this and got on the other 
end of the board which projected about a foot out of 
water. I got a good start. When I came to the bow 
of the boat there was a man doing his best to keep his 



60 LOSS OF THE SULTAI^A. 

head above water. He called to me to know if that 
board would not carry us both. I told him we had got 
where every one must be for himself, and that I could 
not swim and had to depend on that board to bring 
me to safety. He told me that he could not swim and 
pleaded for me to aid him. I could not withstand the 
plea, and told him if he would get off in case the board 
would not carry us both, he could get on with me. It 
proved sufficient and we floated down stream and laud- 
ed on the Arkansas side of the island opposite Mound 
City, where a rebel captain got us out on a rail raft, 
(which he had made so as to cross to the island). 

When rescued I was so chilled that I had no recol- 
lection of being rescued or taken off of the board. 
After getting on land I have some recollection of how 
I fell over, as I could not walk or stand, but I got hold 
of the fence and held on to keep up. Although it was 
daylight, with me it was all darkness. The last that I 
could remember was hearing some ladies tell me to go 
to the fire. How long I was unconscious I know not; 
but before my sight came to me I began to revive, I 
could hear some of the remarks that were made, and 
also could feel that someone was washing my face, but 
did not understand the meaning of this. When I 
awoke I found myself before a big fire in the yard. A 
man handed me a bottle, I took it and was soon satis- 
fied that I knew what it contained. I handed it back 
to him and said, ''^I do not drink whiskey;" (this was 
the first I uttered after being rescued). There were 
nine of us rescued at this place, Mound City (?), and 
were well treated by the two families that lived there. 
A widow gave us a good meal and made us as comfort- 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 61 

able as possible while we were there. The steamboat 
*^ Pocahontas'' came along and took us on board for 
Memphis, Tenn. When we arrived there the ladies of 
the Christian commission supplied us with under- 
clothing. I took an ambulance for Overton hospital, 
where I changed clothes and went to bed and soon lost 
myself in sleep. 

Those of us that were able to go North were sent out 
of the hospital to the Soldier's home for dinner. In 
the evening about two hundred or more took a boat for 
Cairo, 111., where we landed on the following evening. 
A grand reception was given to the soldiers at Mattoon, 
111. I was discharged from the service at '* Camp 
Chase," Ohio, May 17, 1865. 

My occupation is whip-stock making. Postoffice 
address, Sandusky, 0. 



WM. BRACKEN. 

T WAS second lieutenant in Company D, 88th United 
^ States Colored Infantry. At the time the *' Sultana" 
blew up I was officer of the picket guard on the Wolf 
river and was close enough to hear the shrieks and 
groans of the wounded and drowning soldiers and crew, 
but was powerless to aid them for want of boats. The 
United States picket boat *^ Pocahontas " picked up all 
who were alive next day. On board the " Pocahontas" 
were a number of soldiers belonging to the 113th 
Regiment Illinois Volunteers (the regiment to which I 
had formerly belonged), and they said that the general 
impression among the survivors was that the boilers had 



62 LOSS OF THE SULTAKA. 

been tampered with, and that the boat was blown up 
purposely to cause the destruction of the soldiers on 
board. One or more of the employes of the boat were 
also of this opinion and they so expressed themselves. 
I visited the hospitals in Memphis and saw the most 
heart rending sight I ever witnessed. 
My-postoffice address is Putnam, 111. 



JAMES K. BRADY. 

I WAS born near Highlana, Marion county, Ohio, 
^ September 23, 1846, and I lived on a farm until 
1861 when my father and his entire family were taken 
sick with typhoid fever. My father died and I lay 
seventy-eight days before I was able to leave my bed. 

In the fall of 1862, the day before I was sixteen, 
September 22, I enlisted in Company B, 64th Regi- 
ment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and was in every battle 
with my regiment from that time on until the last 
battle of Franklin, Tenn. In front of Atlanta, Ga., I 
received a scalp wound in the back part of my head. 
At Franklin, Tenn., I received a flesh wound in the 
right hip, and, with five others of my company, was 
taken prisoner, November 30, 1864. Marched the next 
day to Columbia, Tenn., and after being held there a 
few days we were marched with about 1,800 or 1,900 
other prisoners to Corinth, Miss., where we were con- 
fined for a few days in a stockade. When we reached 
this we were in a terrible condition, having marched 
several hundred miles over very bad roads, in the winter 
season, with our clothing worn out and nothing much 



LOSS OF THE SULTAITA. 63 

to eat, some barefooted, others sick. We were shipped 
from here to the place which the boys called *' hell 
upon earth," the prison pen of Andersonville. 

On March 2G, 18G5, I, with several hundred others, 
was taken out of prison and after a long journey, part 
of the way by rail and the rest on foot, we reached Big 
Black river, and went in camp near Vicksburg, Miss. 

About the 23rd or 24th of April, I, with a lot of 
paroled prisoners, was loaded aboard the ill-fated 
steamer " Sultana," at Vicksburg, Miss. Our condi- 
tion on this boat was more like a lot of hogs than men. 
With the other passengers and crew, there were about 
2,100 in all, besides a freight cargo, making in all more 
than double the carrying capacity of the boat. We 
were headed up the river for Cairo, 111. The boat 
landed at Memphis, Tenn., on the evening of April 26, 
where a part of the freight was unloaded. Some time 
after we steamed up the river, making a landing to 
take on coal. My friend, David Ettleman, and 1 went 
up to the hurricane deck and made our bed, as we were 
crowded too much below, and laid down. That was 
the last that I knew until the explosion, which occurred 
about two o'clock, A. m., at which time I was suddenly 
awakened to my senses, as the fire was all over me and 
my friend was trying to brush it off; it had already 
burned most of the hair off from the top of my head. 
We finally got the fire out and began looking around 
for some means of saving ourselves, for we could see 
that the boat was on fire. We could see nothing to get, 
so we went to the front end of the hurricane deck and 
took hold of some ropes and went down to the bow of 
jthe boat^ and 0, what a]sight met our gaze ! There 



64 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

were some killed in the explosion, lying in the bottom 
of the boat, being trampled upon, while some were 
crying and praying, many were cursing while others 
were singing. That sight I shall never forget ; I often 
see it in my sleep, and wake with a start. 

After looking for something to save ourselves with 
in vain, we had about given ourselves up as lost, when 
all at once we saw a crowd with something which 
proved to be the gang plank. As this seemed to be 
our last chance my friend and I both grabbed hold of 
it, just as it was going over the side of the boat, and 
we all went down together. I think not less than forty 
or fifty men had hold of that plank, at least there were 
as many as could crowd around it when it went into 
the water, and it was very heavy. I ran beside it. It 
struck the water end first, and I thought it would 
never stop going down, but it finally did, and slowly 
arose to the surface. I think there were about fifteen 
or sixteen of us that had stuck to the plank. But now 
a new danger had seized me, as some one grabbed me 
by the right foot and it seemed as though it was in a 
vise; try as I would, I could not shake him off. I 
gripped the plank with all the strength that I had, 
and then I got my left foot between his hand and my 
foot and while holding on to the plank with both 
hands I pried him loose with my left foot, he taking 
my sock along with him, but he is welcome to the 
sock • he sank out of sight and I saw him no more. 

By this time the plank had been turned over and 
we lost some more of our passengers. I looked back 
and saw that there were two men on the plank behind 
me, how many were in front of me at this time I could 



LOSS OF THE SULTAXA. 65 

not tel], but I knew that my friend was there as every 
little while he would call out some encouraging word 
to me to keep up my spirits. The two men on the 
plank behind me would crawl up on top of it and finally 
upset it again, and one of them lost his grip and went 
down to rise no more. Then the other fellow seemed to 
get crazy, for he not only climbed upon the plank be- 
hind me but reached over and tried to grab me by the 
shoulder. Just as his fingers were touching my shoul- 
der I dropped under the water and he went right over 
me into the river, like a big frog, turning the plank 
over with the force of his plunge, but I came up on the 
other side of the plank, grabbing it with my left hand. 
I never saw that man again. 

I was now getting very tired, in my weak state, as I 
only weighed 96 pounds when I came out of prison. (I 
weighed 154 pounds the day before I was taken pris- 
oner.) I was almost ready to give up when I heard my 
friend Ettleman say, *'now boys, this plank is able to 
carry fifteen or twenty men if properly handled, and 
there are but five or six of us; now I will steady the 
plank while the rest of you get on and lie flat, then I 
will get on.'' We all got on and laid flat down and 
paddled with our hands. It was not long after this 
that one of the men in front said that he could see a 
house, and for us to paddle on the left side. We did 
as we were told and soon had our plank along side of 
the building, which proved to be a log stable with an 
old set of harness hanging up in it. The stable was 
standing on the levee of the river, but as the river was 
all overflowed there was not much of the stable out of 
the water. When it got light enough to count up we 
9 



66 LOSS OF THE SULTAKA. 

found there were twenty-three of us on the stable, and 
as far as the eye could see, upon every old snag and 
every little piece of drift big enough, you would see a 
man. That sight I never will forget. I can see it now 
as I pen these lines. 

A little after daylight a man swam out about three 
rods above us and got on some drift. The sight I hope 
I may never see again for he was scalded almost to 
pieces, and he said, "boys, it is going to kill me,'' and 
he laid down and died. I don't think he lived three 
minutes after he got out of the water. Then there 
was a nice large mule swam out to us just after daylight. 
He had a piece of railing twelve or fourteen feet long 
tied to his halter strap. One of the boys got down and 
unfastened it. What became of the mule I do not 
know, as he was there in the water the last I saw of 
him with just his back, neck and head out of water. 

A little after sunrise we could see the smoke of a 
steamer coming up the river, and in due time she came 
up to where we were. The steamer came as close as 
she dared to and sent out little boats to take us in. 
I had now become so stiff that I could not move and 
my friend, with some of the boat's crew, carried me 
down into a little boat and took me over to the large 
one, which proved to be the ''Jenny Lind." There 
was a doctor on board and he gave us something to 
make us throw up the water, but I did not throw any 
up. They carried me in the cabin, and that was the 
last I knew until about four o'clock in the afternoon. 
When I awoke there was one of the Sisters of Charity 
trying to pour a hot sling down my throat with a 
teaspoon, for I found that I was in a hospital at Mem- 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 67 

phis, Tenn. After waking up it was not long until I 
opened my mouth, and I think there was about a 
gallon of water ran out of it. I wanted to go out and 
see if the other boys were safe. They would not allow 
me to go, for they said I was too weak, but the next 
afternoon they let me go and I found three of my com- 
panions alive — some of them badly hurt. The other 
two were either drowned or killed in the explosion. 

The next day we took a steamer for Cairo, 111., arriv- 
ing there just after dark. Most of the boys went to 
the barracks as they were afraid they would get left, 
but I, with a few others, stopped at the Soldier's 
home, where we received the finest of treatment, a good 
supper (something we had not had for three long years), 
and a nice bed. It was not long before I was sound 
asleep, and I knew no more until I got a gentle shake 
from one of the attendants that awoke me, but at the 
same time he said don't be in any hurry you have 
plenty of time. I got up feeling greatly refreshed, 
dressed and washed myself and sat down to a break- 
fast that was good enough for a king. After break- 
fast one of the men went to the train with us, getting 
there just five minutes before leaving time. Then we 
started for Mattoon, 111., arriving there about eleven 
o'clock, and 0, what a sight we witnessed ! The plat- 
form at the depot was crowded, from one end to the 
other, with the citizens of Mattoon and surrounding 
country, with baskets filled to over-flowing with every 
thing you could think of to eat. As fast as a basket 
was empty it was refilled, and after we had eaten all 
we could it seemed as though the baskets hadn't been 
touche^* ^^^ ^^ ^^y ^^^* during my entire term of 



68 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

service I never received such treatment as while in 
the State of Illinois. 

After we had finished eating the citizens wanted us 
to go home with them and stay until evening, for we 
could not get a train before that time. In the after- 
noon it was learned that we could not get away until 
one o'clock that night. The people of the town called 
a meeting in a new hotel, which was not completed in- 
side yet. That evening the local speakers of the town 
made several patriotic speeches to us, but what was the 
nicest thing of all there were about forty ladies, dressed 
in red, white and blue, that sang several patriotic 
songs; among the rest they sang ''Welcome home, 
dear brothers," and it seemed that we were. Ever 
since that time I have had a warm place in my heart 
for the people of Mattoon and surrounding country, 
also for the people of Cairo, 111. But all things have 
an end, and so at one o'clock we started for Columbus, 
the capital of the great and glorious old state of Ohio. 
In due time we arrived ; but oh, what a change, instead 
of being treated like lords, as we were in Illinois, we 
were treated more like so many dogs than human 
beings. Myself and a few others could not endure this 
kind of treatment, so we took French leave and went 
home. In about two weeks I received notice to come 
to Columbus and get discharged. We were discharged 
by order of special telegram from the War Depart- 
ment, without any descriptive list. I came home and 
went around to see my friends and neighbors, but when 
I went around it seemed as though everybody was gone 
or dead. 

Being in so much company for three years I became 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 



69 



restless, packed my kit aad went to Missouri. It was 
a little more lively there, as every man I met had a 
large navy revolver strapped to him. It made no dif- 
ference whether he was a banker, dry goods man or a 
farmer; it was all the same, the revolver was there. I 
remained there eighteen months and was never treated 
better by any people anywhere, and I never carried a 
weapon of any kind. Then I came home, mar- 
ried, and went to farming. I didn't like that. Then 
I went into the timber business, getting out spiles and 
stave bolts. I finally quit that and went into the re- 
tail grocery business. I followed that for about nine 
years, but at the present time I am not doing much of 
anything. 
My post office address is Morral, Ohio. 



JOSEPH BRINGMAN. 

T W A S born in Mansfield, 
*^ Ohio, on the 16th of April, 
1841. Enlisted in the service 
of the United States at Mans- 
field, Ohio, on the 6th of Au- 
gust, 1862, in Company D, of 
the 102d Regiment Ohio Volun- 
teer Infantry. Was captured at 
Athens, Ala., on the 24th of 

September, 1864, and confined in the prison at Cah aba, 

Ala. 

When 1 went on the steamer ''Sultana," at Vicks- 

burg, I was sick and very weak and all of my teeth 




70 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

seemed to be loose (the result of prison life). Some- 
time in the evening of the 26th of April, 1865, we 
stopped at Memphis, Tenn., to take on coal. After 
this was done we started up the river and I laid down 
outside of the balusters on the cabin floor, on the left 
side of the boat. I did not sleep very soundly and my 
sleep was disturbed by dreams. I had kept on my 
clothing as it looked rainy. A rope was stretched 
some twelve or fifteen feet above the deck, running to 
the spar, with which I came in contact some way as I 
afterwards found the marks of the rope on my body, 
which causes me to speak of it here. It appeared to 
me in my dream that I was walking leisurely on an 
incline or sloping hill, and when I reached the top 
there appeared to be a ledge or projecting rock over- 
hanging a river; I seemed to step upon it so as to look 
down into the water, and just as I took the second 
step the rock seemed to burst with a report like the 
shot of a distant cannon. I felt pieces of rock striking 
my face and head and I seemed to be hurled out into 
the river. The sensation was like striking the water 
with my side and shoulders and going under with a 
waving or oscillating motion. I came to the surface, 
but was still not fully conscious, and started down 
again with apparently the same motion but did not 
seem to go down so far. I became more conscious, and 
began to strangle. I now found that it was not all a 
dream, and also that my clothing was an incumbrance 
and at once divested myself of it. On coming to 
the surface of the water I struck a scantling some four 
inches square, I seized it and also managed to get some 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 71 

more floating debris, and by this means I was able to 
keep above the water. 

My thoughts were more collected now, and I could 
see men in the water near me and also horses strug- 
gling in the water, and one horse came near papsizing 
my frail float. My impression was that the boat had 
capsized and thrown us off. I then asked some of 
those that were in the water *' what had happened to 
the boat.'' None of them knew. A moment later we 
saw a light and then we knew that the boat was on fire, 
and in a very short time the flames lighted up the river 
all around. I shall never forget that terrible ordeal. 
The water was icy cold and in every direction men 
were shivering and calling for help, while the water 
was carrying us swiftly down the stream. The boat 
did not follow and the darkness prevented us from see- 
ing each other. 

After floating some distance I heard Phillip Home, 
of Company I, telling some of the others how to work 
to get ashore. I called to him and he asked who I was. 
I told him, and then he asked me what I had for a float. 
I answered and he said that they had part of a floor 
and called to me to come and get on. I worked over 
to them and tried to get on, but their floor seemed to 
sink too much and I did not venture on. I told them 
that I would stick to my boards and scantling. Had 
just let loose of their floor when it struck something 
and turned over. I understood that several were 
drowned. Floating along I several times came near 
the shore, but each time the current drew rae back to- 
ward the middle of the stream. I could see the build- 
ings on the bank of the river at Memphis as I floated 



72 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

past and hallooed for help. The steamers along the 
wharf were ringing their bells and men were out in 
canoes, but I was on the opposite side of the river and 
was not noticed. I was so chilled that I was powerless, 
and a kind of drowsiness came over me. I felt that I 
was going to sleep and I seemed as comfortable as if in 
a downy bed. I soon dropped to sleep, or to uncon- 
sciousness, with the music of the bells of the steamers 
ringing in my ears. The next I knew I was on a boat 
at the wharf or landing at Memphis, lying on a mat- 
tress, and several men were working over me trying to 
bring me to consciousness. The boat had picked me 
up with others, from eight to fourteen miles below 
where the explosion took place. I knew nothing about 
this except what I was told. I learned that our boat, 
the *^ Sultana," had blown up. There were twelve 
of my company oq board that boat and only two of us 
escaped. I was taken from the boat and conveyed in 
a carriage to the hospital at Memphis, and on going up 
the stairway I dropped down and was unconscious till 
the next day. My injuries were a fractured arm, three 
broken ribs, my face somewhat scalded, scarred and 
bruised all over, and frozen to unconsciousness. I was 
at the hospital about four days when an order came to 
discharge all that were able to go home. I got up and 
walked around to show that I was able to go, but I suf- 
fered terribly before I got very far. 

I was discharged at "Camp Chase," Ohio, on the 
20th of May, 1865, and was soon at home but could 
not do any work until cold weather that fall, and I feel 
the effects of that exposure and shaking up to this day. 

My present occupation is farming, postoffico address 
Enon Valley, Pa. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 



73 




'^\fe 



A. C. BROWN. 

T WAS born in Clermont county, Ohio, on the 24th of 
^ November, 1838. Enlisted in the service of the 
United States on the 3rd of September, 1861, in 
Company I, 2nd Ohio Volunteer Infantry and served 
in the first brigade of first division of the fourteenth 
army corps, Army of the Cumberland. 

While in command of my company at the battle of 
Cl ckamauga, September 20, 1863, was taken prisoner ; 
had already served over two years of active service. 
Was taken from the battle-field to Belle Isle, which is 
in the middle of the James river, opposite Richmond, 
Va. ; remained on the island but a short time and was 



74 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

then transferred to Smith's building, opposite Libby 
prison, in Richmond. In this prison we had the best 
fare while in the so-called Southern cjnfederacy. They 
gave us all the mule meat we could eat. The guards 
around this prison were not unlike those that were on 
duty at many others, always watching for an excuse to 
kill a "Yank," and, as many of the guards had never 
been to the front and were not likely to be sent there 
as they were too cowardly to be trusted, their only 
chance to kill a "Yank" was to take one of us that 
was unarmed and shut up in a building where the 
" Yank '' could not even get at him with his fist. It 
was only when they were sure that they were out of 
harm's way that they had the bravery to shoot one of 
us. Our boys had noticed that some of the guards 
wanted to immortalize their name by killing one of us, 
so we concluded to test their marksmanship. Late at 
night, when most of the boys were asleep, we would 
raise the window and present the '' Yank " that was to 
be sacrificed in order that the guard, who was exposed 
to the dews and night fall, might get a furlough 
and go home for his health. This, I believe, was the 
order at all the prisons, that if one of us was shot for 
breaking the rules the guard that did the shooting was 
f urloughed. As soon as the ^' Yank " would appear at 
the window the boys would commence to tantalize the 
guard to get him to shoot. Bang would go the gun 
and the *' Yank" would fall back pierced by ball and 
buckshot. We did not have much trouble to stop the 
blood, as the supposed '^ Yank " was a broom-stick 
with a piece nailed across to represent arms, clothed in 
blouse and cap ; so the same *' Yank" would immedi- 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 75 

ately appear in the window and call in question the 
marksmanship of the guard. Of course such perform- 
ances would alarm the rest of the guards and there 
would be a detail made to double the guard for the 
rest of the night. Many instances of my prison life 
might be referred to which were similar to that. 

After two months at Richmond, by which time they 
had to commence eating the mule meat themselves, we 
were taken to Danville, Va., (where they had the riot 
last fall and the darkies killed so many of the white 
people). We were kept at Danville the balance of the 
winter of 1863 and 1864, and in the spring of the latter 
year were taken to Andersonville, Ga., where I was in- 
troduced to Capt. Wirtz, April 18th. On our arrival 
here I told my comrades that we were in for the war. 
This proved to be the fact. I was kept here until the 
18th of March, 18G5, which made my stay at Anderson- 
ville eleven months to a day, and a little over nineteen 
months a prisoner of war. The records at Washington 
show that over 180,000 of our soldiers were captured 
and imprisoned during the war, and only about twenty- 
five or thirty thousand are now supposed to be living. 

We left Andersonville on the 18th of March, 1865, 
destination unknown to us. Of course, as it was on all 
occasions when we were being transported from one 
prison to another, '^we were going to be exchanged.'* 
We started south and finally, after traveling by rail- 
road, river and on foot, we came to Big Black river, 
twelve or fifteen (^eight) miles from Vicksburg and were 
here paroled. The conditions admitted of our Sani- 
tary Commission feeding and clothing us, but we 



76 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

were to remain under control of the Confederate major 
until legally exchanged. 

While here I was called upon by the agent of the South- 
ern express company at Vicksburg who informed me 
that he had received a dispatch from the superintendent 
of the Adams express company at Cincinnati, Ohio, re- 
questing him to render me any assistance I required in 
cash or otherwise. I requested that the agent would 
kindly return my thanks to those of my friends North 
who had so kindly remembered me and my sufferings, 
and all the favor I asked was when we were to be sent 
North that cabin passage be procured for me. It was 
while here in camp that word came of the assassination 
of our beloved president, Abraham Lincoln. Our 
Confederate major concluded that it was not a healthy 
place for him and deserted us — so I am still on parole, 
having never been exchanged. A train was sent for us 
and we were shipped to Vicksburg. When marching 
from the train to the wharf, and when near the boat, 
I saw my friend, the express agent, awaiting me on the 
cabin deck. I stepped on the ill-fated steamer and was 
introduced to the first clerk, when I was informed that 
my fare was paid to Cairo. The express agent, after 
wishing me a safe trip, bade me good-bye and went up 
town. It was now about eleven o'clock. I soon sat 
down to dinner. You can imagine the contrast be- 
tween sitting down at a table filled with all the sub- 
stantials and pastry, in the finely furnished cabin of a 
steamer, compared with the surroundings and fare at 
Andersonville. After eating a very light meal of the 
plainest food on the table, I helped myself to more 
than some would think proper under different circum- 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 77 

stances and carried out to my comrades quite an arm- 
ful of victuals. I found them going for the hard tack 
and " Lincoln " coffee with a relish. A happier crowd 
I never saw ; we all felt that a few more hours woulr' 
land us at home where anxious friends were awaiting 
our return. Our names had already been forwarded 
by telegraph to the press North, and many hearts were 
made light by the prospect of meeting a son, a hus- 
band, brother or sweetheart. It is well, my friends, 
that we cannot see into the future. Little did this 
happy throng know what awaited it; that in a few 
more hours some were to be roasted — yes burned to 
death — while others would be struggling with the waves 
only to sink, to rise no more. Many the tears I have 
shed in remembrance of this doubly sad calamity. 
After my comrades had faced the leaden hail, had 
fallen into the hands of the enemy, passed through all 
the harrowing experiences of prison life, that they 
should meet such a fate when almost in the embrace of 
friends at home seemed doubly sad. 

We left Yicksburg in the evening after supper. The 
clerk and myself had quite a chat and he seemed to take 
quite an interest in having me relate some of my prison 
experiences. I broke in on his questioning to find out 
how many there were on board the boat. (The " Sul- 
tana'' was one of the largest boats on the Mississippi 
river.) The clerk replied that if we arrived safe at 
Cairo it would be the greatest trip ever made on the 
western waters, as there were moro people on board 
than were ever carried on one boat on the Mississippi 
river. He stated that there were 2,400 soldiers, 100 
citizen passengers, and a crew of about eighty — in all 



78 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

over 2,500. We arrived at Memphis, Tenn., at about 
ten o'clock at night, April 26th. I retired to my state- 
room, and the last that I remember they were taking 
on coal. I was wakeful, and commenced to plan what 
I would do in case of an accident to the boat. There 
were so many passengers on board that there would be 
great excitement. I decided that in case of a fire I 
would get olT the boat as soon as possible. I then went 
to sleep. * * * 

I learned after the accident that it was about three 
o'clock in the morning of the 27th of April, 1805, in dark 
and misting rain, when about seven or eight miles 
above Memphis and near the cluster of islands called 
the "Hen and Chickens," that one of the boilers of 
the boat explo.ded and the boat burned to the water's 
edge. The first I knew after going to sleep I found 
myself laying on the opposite side of the cabin from my 
stateroom, about the middle of the boat. The steam 
was rushing up all about me and the fire was starting. 
The bo&t from midway forward was all torn to frag- 
ments, and this was the part of the boat that was occu- 
pied by the boys. Back of me the chandelier in the 
ladies' room was burning brightly. I got up and 
started to the rear of the boat through the ladies' 
cabin ; passed a lady who was putting a second set of 
life preservers on a little child; this was the only child 
on board. When I reached the railing at the rear of 
the boat, after assisting a lady to throw overboard her 
trunk, I laid off my heavy army shirt that I might not 
be incumbered by its heavy weight in the water, and 
overboard I started. Before I reached the water some- 
thing was thrown over that hit me and down I went 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 79 

under the water. As I came up a drowning man caught 
me around the neck with a death grip, and under we 
went — the second time for me. As we sank I strangled. 
I now passed through the same experience that only a 
drowning person or those about to drown undergo. Ir: 
those few seconds of time my whole life, from my child- 
hood down to that terrible moment, passed before mt- 
like a panorama with perfect distinctness. As we came 
to the surface I freed myself from his deadly grasp 
and struck out for myself. I now took account of stock 
and found all I possessed of this world^s goods was a 
string around each ankle. As I did not want to be 
weighed down with the garment that was afloat and 
fastened to the strings, I swam with one hand at a 
time and with the other hand broke the strings. When 
about three or four hundred yards away from the boat 
the whole heavens seemed to be lighted up by the con- 
flagration. Hundreds of my comrades were fastened 
down by the timbers of the decks and had to burn, 
while the water seemed to be one solid mass cf human 
beings struggling with the waves. The light and the 
screams at this time cannot be described. Out of 2,500 
only about 600 were rescued, and about 200 of the 
rescued died soon after from the injuries received at 
the time of the accident. Most all on board were from 
the middle and western States. 

The adjutant general of the State of Michigan, in 
reporting for the last year of the war, refers to the 
** Sultana" explosion as being the greatest calamity of 
the war ; a great many Michigan men were on board 
and lost. 

I swam about four miles and came to an island cov- 



80 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

ered with timber. I climbed a tree, and the water 
surrounding it was about ten feet deep. Now, when 
I hear persons talking about being hard up, I think of 
my condition at that time — up in a tree in the middle 
of the Mississippi river, a thousand miles from home, 
lot one cent to my name, nor a pocket to put it in 
-and, to contrast my appearance then, with my face 
-cratched and swollen, my weight about one hundred 
pounds, with my appearance today reminds me of two 
Irishmen who, on meeting, each thought he recognized 
an old acquaintance, afterwards found they were mis- 
taken and one said to the other: *' You thought it 
was me and I thought it was you, but bejabers it is 
naither of us !" 

I was about to close and leave myself up a tree. After 
remaining in the tree about four hours, a boat came 
along and took me olT. Was mustered out of the 
service on the 6th of May, 1865. 

My present postoffice address is Canon City, Col. 



MICHAEL BRUNNER. 

T WAS born in Bavaria, Germany, on the 25th of 
^ January, 1841. 1 enlisted in the service of the 
United States, in September, 1861, at Georgetown, 
Ohio, as a private in Company C of the 59th Regi- 
ment Ohio Volunteer Infantry. I was captured on the 
19th of September, 18G3, at the battle of Chickamauga, 
Tenn., confined two days at Belle Island, then in a 
warehouse of Royster & Bros, in Richmond, Va., thence 
to Danville prison, No. 5. From Libby prison, I, with 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 81 

three other comrades, escaped, but was recaptured 
near the Blue Mountains, Va., and taken back again 
to Libby prison, and thence transferred to Anderson- 
ville, Ga., in 1864. In December escaped from the 
hospital at Andersonville with two comrades, Joseph 
Pritchet of Ohio and Alex. Simpson of Indiana. We 
were recaptured near Bainbridge, Ga., near the Florida 
line, and returned to Andersonville in sixteen days 
after escape. Remained in Andersonville until March 
1805, when 1 was taken to Black river. Miss., near 
Vicksburg, and paroled. Was placed on board the 
steamer '* Sultana" on the 25th of April, 1865. I 
wss on the outside of the cabin deck near the stairway 
at the time of the explosion and jumped on a stage 
plank and remained on it until it broke down, crushing 
many prisoners under it. I then remained on the front 
part of the boat until she was nearly burned up and 
sinking, when I got hold of a piece of plank which 
supported me until I floated ashore on the Arkansas 
side of the river, where I was picked up by a skiff and 
conveyed over to Memphis by the steamer ** Bostonian." 
I was discharged from the service at Columbus, Ohio, 
on the 6th of May, 1865, 

My present occupation is thit of a shoemaker, 
PostotFice address, Georgetown, Ohio. 



11 



82 LOSS 0¥ THE bULTANA. 

WM. CARVER. 

T ENLISTED in the service of the United States 
* November 5, 1862, in Company B of the 3rd Ten- 
nessee Cavalry, to serve three years or during the war. 
Was captured at Sulphur Branch Trestle, which is 
near Athens, Ala., September 25, 1864, and from there 
was taken to Cahaba, Ala., where I remained until 
the water had overflown the prison. Left Cahaba 
on the 6th and arrived at Vicksburg the 16th of 
March, 1865, where I remained until the 24th of 
April, and boarded the steamer" Sultana." On the 
morning of the 27th of April, 1865, between two and 
three o'clock, the explosion took place. I was asleep 
on the hurricane deck of the boat, behind the wheel- 
house. The report partially awoke me, and the next I 
heard were the cries of the terrified people, which 
words are inadequate to express. I remained on the 
boat as long as I could with safety, then went to the 
lower deck and jumped overboard. The drowning 
men grabbed me and held me under the water. As 
soon as I got clear I came to the surface of the water 
and swam to the wheel of the boat. A comrade reached 
down and helped me upon it. I was very much 
exhausted, and rested awhile, when I felt the wheel 
giving way. It broke loose and fell into the water and 
drew me under. I felt something strike my side. It 
was the iron rod in the wheel. I clung to it the best I 
could. When the flames came towards me I buried 
myself in the water as long as I could. I was burned 
severely on the right side of my face and shoulder. In 
some way I got on a board with a comrade, and we 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 83 

floated to a drift pile on the Arkansas side of the river, 
I had no clothing on, and it was about daylight when 
we landed on the drift pile and two men came out to 
us in an old dugout and took five of us to the Arkansas 
shore. After a time the steamer *' Silver Spray" came 
along, took us on board and landed us at Memphis, 
Tenn. I was placed in the hospital and well cared for, 
but my father was among the missing ones. 

We left Memphis on the 30th of April for ''Camp 
Chase," Columbus, Ohio, and from there to Nashville, 
Tenn., where I was discharged from the service June 
10, 1865. 



ABRAHAM CASSEL. 

T WAS born in Montgomery county, Pa., and lived 
there until I was seventeen years of age, and then 
came to Ohio. Enlisted in the service of the United 
States at Findley, Ohio, on the 19th of January, 1861, 
in Company B 2lst Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry. 
Was captured at Kingston, Ga., November 6, 1864, and 
taken to Cahaba, Ala. At the time of the explosion I 
swam about three miles and was rescued at 10 a. m., 
more dead than alive. 

Not able to work. Postoffice address McComb, 
Ohio. 



84 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 




SIMEON D. CHELF. 



I WAS born in Green county, Ky., on the 17th of 
January, 1844. I enlisted in the service of the 
United States at Liberty, Ky., on the 23rd of July, 
1862, as a private in Company G of the 6th Kentucky 
Cavalry. About the Ist of March, 1865, our regiment 
left Nashville, Tenn., for East Port, Miss. After 
letting our horses rest a few days we started on what 
was known as the "Wilson raid," we supposed for 
Mobile, Ala. Gen. Crookston with the first brigade, 
which consisted of the 4th Kentucky Mounted Infantry, 
2nd Michigan Cavalry, 6th Kentucky Cavalry and was 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 85 

8th Iowa Cavalry, was en route for Tuscaloosa, Ala., 
and on the 31st encamped within twenty miles of Tus- 
caloosa. The next morning, by gray daylight, our 
pickets commenced firing. We were all soon mounted, 
and Companies and Gr of the 6th Kentucky Cavalry 
were detailed for rear guard. Our army marched down 
the road and was gone about one hour when the firing 
increased. Then it ceased for a few minutes. Our 
companies were in line ready to march when the rebels 
commenced firing on us again. We swung into line 
and seeing so many blue coats we hallooed to them to 
cease firing which they did for a moment. Capt. Paris 
and Lieut. J. J. Surber ordered a charge, which was 
made expecting to regain our command although we 
encountered a larger force of rebels. We charged 
through the line of battle, then into a brigade that was 
marching by fours. At the rear of this brigade was a 
barricade (or a fence) built across the road. There 
five of us stopped and were firing down the column of 
another brigade, and while there we had to surrender. 
The rebels took us back on the road about a mile and 
then began to take such clothing from us as best suited 
them. Oh, well do I remember of a rebel who traded 
me a pair of shoes for a good pair of boots, and all the 
difference I got was : ''Set down you *Yank,' or I'll 
put my bayonet through you, while I pull them boots 
off.'* Of course the persuasion caused the trade. 
They then started to take us to prison. While march- 
ing along an old man came out to the road and said, 

** I guess, d you, you 'uns ain't out stealing horses 

today like you 'uns were yesterday." S. H. Davenport 
looked at him and said, *'Yes, d your old soul, 



86 LOSS OF THE sulta:n"a. 

you ain't hid in the woods like you were yesterday." 
They marched us afoot until late in the night, and not 
a bite to eat until on the 2nd of April, about 10 o'clock, 
and that was dry corn dodgers. 

We got to Uniontown, Ala., the 4th of April, and 
while there some twenty or thirty of the 1st Mississippi 
Cavalry came in. They wanted to know '* what kind 
of guns you d * Yanks" got?' (We had Spencer car- 
bines.) I told them that we could wind them up and 
start them to shooting at sunrise and they would not 
stop until sundown. " Well, I believe it; for you 'uns 
kept a solid cloud of lead over our breast-work at 
Selma." 

From Uniontown we went to Moberly, Ala., on Tom- 
bigbee river. There we stopped for the night and I asked 
permission to go and buy some sweet potatoes of some 
''darkies." It was granted, and a guard (we called 
them our body-guard) went with me. I got as many 
potatoes as I could carry for a five-dollar confederate 
bill, and on my return to where the rest of the boys 
were I saw a confederate soldier peddling whiskey. 
I asked him how he sold it, and he said, " five dollars a 
glass." I told him I would take three glasses. I 
drank one, gave one to my messmate and the other to 
my lieutenant. 

On the following morning we boarded a boat, crossed 
the river and there the home guards were out, all of 
them, wanting to kill a "Yank." Then we started 
from there to Meridian, Miss., where they searched 
every one of us and marched us into prison. When 
the first two of our squad entered the prison the old 
prisoners commenced yelling, "fresh fish." After we 



LOSS OF TTFE SULTANA. 87 

all got in they flocked around us to get the news from 
the outside world. Everyone was anxious to know 
what our army was doing. After we were in the prison 
awhile we drew our rations which were one pint of 
corn meal, ground cob and all together (this was 
one man's rations), and a half of a hog jowl 
for ten men per day, and also some pine wood 
with which we did our cooking. After our fires were 
in full blast one of the 7th Illinois Cavalry and I were 
talking. I said to him, *'I do not want to hurt your 
feelings, but a body-guard is crawling on your neck." 
His reply was, "it does not hurt my feelings at all; if 
the sun shines out you will see plenty of them." (There 
is no use of my telling it for few will believe it.) The 
sun shone bright next day and you could see them 
crawling all over the prison, but lucky for us we did 
not remain there long. 

We were on the road to Vicksburg, Miss., to go into 
parole camp. We were there when Lincoln was assassi- 
nated (one of the best men that ever sat in the presi- 
dential chair, and if he was alive today we, the rank 
and file, would be better treated by the law-making 
powers of the land). After we got into parole camp 
and had plenty to eat we were happy once more. 

We boarded the ill-fated steamer '' Sultana" April 
25, 1865, and at dusk she started out with her heavy 
freight for Memphis, Tenn. The river was up to high- 
water mark (I thought it was over high-water mark 
when I came to try it). 

We landed at Memphis, April 26, 1865, and unloaded 
some sugar, I donH know how much. We then pulled 
out to a barge of coal and took on enough to run to 



88 LOSS OP THE SULTANA. 

Cairo, III. Then we started up the river, everything 
seeming to be safe. About two o'clock in the morning 
of April the 27th the boiler of the boat exploded* 
When this took place I was sleeping on the bow of the 
boat with my head against one of the cable posts. 
Seth H. Davenport was at my left and on his left was 
a man who was killed. A piece of iron glanced my 
head, and in the excitement I thought the rebels had 
fired a battery on u?. My blankets were covered with 
ashes, cinders and fragments of timber and they were 
rather heavy to crawl from under. The front part of 
the cabin and the pilot house were blown to atoms and 
the stairway damaged so it could not be traveled. The 
boat was crowded with soldiers from boiler deck to 
hurricane deck. A man stood on the lower part of 
the stairway and hallooed, '' the boat is sinking !" The 
men rushed to the bow of the boat and jumped over- 
board as fast as they could, tumbling into the river 
upon each other and going down into the deep by the 
hundreds. 

After the main rush was over I had more room and 
could see what was going on. While gazing about I 
saw the fire start up in the coal that lay near the 
furnace. I looked for a bucket so as to get water to 
put it out, but couldn't find any. I went to the bow 
of the boat to see what had become of the man that 
was killed. He was still there but all of his clothing 
was torn off him by the men running over his body. I 
began to look for something to aid me in swimming. 
I found a board fourteen or sixteen feet long, and was 
watching my opportunity to jump off and to keep as 
far from anyone as I could, when A. M. Jacobs came to 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 89 

me and asked me to save his life. He said, '*you can 
swim and I cannot." I replied, ^'I will help you all I 
can, but a man cannot do much in water." He then 
asked me to give him my board for his pole, as he 
called it — it was a small post used in the framework 
of the cabin, and was four by six inches square at each 
end and the rest was worked down. I did so. We 
both went to the bow of the boat to jump overboard, 
but there were too many men in the water, the water 
being covered with men's heads, all of them begging 
for something to be thrown to them on which they 
might escape. I believe I saw 150 or 200 men sink at 
once near the bow of the boat. 

The fire was now getting headway and sweeping 
everything with which it came in contact, and I knew 
I must take to the water. I looked around for the 
man that was killed, but he was gone (I suppose some 
one threw him overboard to keep him from being 
burned up). Jacobs and I walked to the edge of the 
boat and stopped and prayed, and, at the amen, we 
both jumped overboard. Jacobs held to the board I 
gave him, and when I came to the surface of the water 
I told him to put one end of the board under his breast 
and hold it there with one hand, paddle with the other 
hand and to kick with both feet. After he got started 
on his board I told him to do the best he could and I 
started for the Arkansas shore. 

The boat being now under heavy flames gave good 
light so I could see the timber. When I got about half 
way between the burning steamer and the shore a boat 
came down the river with bales of hay, which were 
dumped into the river. The waves overtaking me I 



90 LOSS OF THE SULTAN^A. 

was strangled by their slapping me in the face. At 
length I got the run of them by diving through one 
and riding the next. When I was within three or four 
hundred yards from the timber a young man came 
swimming up behind me and said, '*ha ! pard, haven't 
you something I could rest my hand on until we get 
to the bushes?'' I stopped and looked at him and 
asked him if he had any clothes on. He said he had 
on his shirt. I told him to take it off and he could 
swim better. He did so, and I pushed my post back 
and he put his hand on one end, I on the other, and 
we both got the *^step" and landed in the bushes 
together. Thinking now of having a good rest, I took 
hold the tops of two bushes; letting myself down 
full length and not finding bottom I concluded that 
was no place to rest and started out in the brush to 
find land. Coming to a leaning willow I threw my 
left arm and foot over it to rest. It held about half of 
my body out of water, but I got chilly in that position 
and again let down for bottom but could not find it. 
I then pulled out for the shore, but was unable to find 
it after wandering around one or two hours. (This is 
very much shorter than I thought it was at that time.) 
I then started for the main part of the river, think- 
ing some boat might pick me up, every now and then 
hallooing, *' has anybody found land?" A man hallooed, 
'' here's a good dry log you can get on." I told him 
to keep up a noise so I could find him (it being then 
the darkest hour of the night — just before daybreak). 
We kept up a chat until I reached the log which had a 
limb about three feet long. I threw my arms over the 
limb, but I could not kick another lick. I could not 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 91 

have got on tho log if he had not helped me. I placed 
my feet on the limb and with my hands rubbed and 
hit myself on tho breast. I got so blind I could not 
see. After that wore off I could stand up; then I 
jumped up and down to start the perspiration. After 
the dawn of day mosquitoes came on us by the thou- 
sands. We had it pretty lively then until we were taken 
on board of a vessel the name of which I do not 
remember. Wo were landed at Memphis and taken to 
the Soldiers' Home. All the clothing I had was a rebel 
hat, calico shirt, and a pair of red llannel drawers. A. 
Khodes and I slept on a newspaper so as to keep our 
clothes clean. We remained there eight or ten dayp. 

After we drew our clothing we were put on a boat 
and started for Cairo, 111. There we stopped at the 
Soldier's Kest, afterward boarded a train and ran up 
to Mattoon, where the citizens had provided plenty 
for us to eat. From there we went to Terre Haute, 
Ind., where we were treated well by the citizens. 
From Terre Haute to Indianapolis, where we received 
a good supply of bacon and beans. Our next stopping 
place was Columbus, Ohio, where we stopped over 
night in Tod Barracks, and the following morning 
started for ** Camp Chase'' where we were discharged 
from the service. 

While walking up the street we met a man who had 
a boiled shirt and he asked A. Rhodes, '^ What regi- 
ment is this ?" He answered, " No regiment at all ; just 
a detail of Wilson's cavalry sent down the Mississippi 
river to catch alligators." 

My present occupation is farming. Postoffice address 
Lebanon, Kansas. 



9a LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 



WILLIAM A. CHRISTINE. 

T WAS born in Wooster, Ohio, September 23, 1841, 
* and enlisted in the service of the United States 
at the same place, August 6, 1862, in Company H, 
102d Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Was captured at 
Athens, Ala., 24th of September, 1864, and confined 
in the Cahaba, Ala., prison. At the time the '' Sultana'' 
exploded I was sleeping with my comrades on the hur- 
ricane deck. I looked around but saw nothing of 
them, so I went down into the cook room and found a 
barrel, with one end out, and threw it overboard and 
then jumped after it; but got into a crowd, so I let it 
go and got on the wheel and undressed and again 
jumped. Something fell on me and burned my head. 
On looking back I saw a plank floating toward me and 
grabbed hold of it. A young man who had a plank 
divided with me, and then we started on our trip down 
the river. Soon after this we were joined by com- 
rade Elias Hines of the 18th Michigan. We noticed 
that the first man was not in his right mind, and on 
reaching one of those strong currents which carried us 
around, he fell oS and I suppose was drowned. As he 
was about eight feet from either of us we could not 
help him, we had all we could do to hold the planks 
together. We floated down the stream until daylight, 
when, on reaching Memphis, we were picked up by 
some of the fire department and taken up the stream 
about a mile, when we crossed over and landed below 
the city among some barges. I received a blouse from 
Comrade Hines and a pair of pants from some one on 
the wharf, then went to the hospital and got cleaned 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 93 

up. The 102d Ohio Volunteer Infantry had one hun- 
dred and five (105) men on the boat and only thirty- 
two were saved. Out of fourteen men in Company H 
only three were saved. 

Occupation, railway mail business. Postoffice address 
319 East Spring street, Columbus, Ohio. 



F. A. CLAPSADDLE. 

T WAS born near Union ville, Columbus county, Ohio, 
^ July 28, 1842, and enlisted iu the service of the 
United States, at Alliance, Ohio, August 9, 1862, in 
Company F, 115th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry. 
Was captured at Block House No 1, Nashville & 
Chattanooga Kailroad, December 4, 18G3, and confined 
in the Meridian, Miss., and Andersonville, Ga., prisons. 
The night of the explosion being a warm night I 
took off all my clothes but my shirt and drawers before 
lying down. I was on the hurricane deck, near the 
bell frame, fast asleep when the explosion took place 
Something fell and struck the frame, covering me so that 
I could not get out at first, but by hard pulling I crawled 
out under the rods or braces of it. The deck appeared 
to be deserted, I could not see anyone. I threw a 
blanket over my shoulders and jumped to the cabin 
deck and from there to the lower deck. I will ever 
remember the terrible scene I witnessed there. I got 
a small board, went to the west end of the boat, near 
the wheel, and commending myself to the care of Him 
who ruleth all things, I jumped into the water. I 
went down deep and strangled badly, but, being a good 



94 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

swimmer, did not get excited. My greatest fear was 
that I would get into the jam and someone would get 
hold of me and pull me down under. I was within 
talking distance of but one person while swimming. 
I picked up two short pieces of boards while in the 
water, and laid one across the other under my breast, 
so that I kept above water without much trouble. I 
became very cold and my limbs began to cramp. After 
a while seeing a light I headed for it, and when I 
reached the place some men threw a rope out to me; I 
let my little bark go and grabbed hold of it, and about 
daylight they pulled me ashore. I was very badly 
chilled. There were fifteen of my company on the 
boat and eight were lost. 

Occupation, farming. Postoffice address Marlboro, 
Stark county, Ohio. 



GEORGE A. CLARKSON. 

I WAS born in England, April 8, 1835. I enlisted 
in (Capt. Motts) Company B, Ist Michigan Lan- 
cers, Augusts, 1861, and mustered out of the service 
with regiment March 21, 1862. Ee-enlisted as a 
corporal in Company H (Capt. Purdy), 5th Michigan 
Cavalry, August 18, 1862, at Milford, Mich. At the 
battle of Trevillian Station, Va., June 11, 1864, was 
taken prisoner with eighteen of my company. Was 
taken to Kichmond, Va., first to the Pemberton build- 
ing — there stripped and searched for money, then to 
Libby prison, and from there to Andersonville. Our 
sufferings on the cars for the want of food and water 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 95 

were great. Left Andersonville for Millen October 
31st, and afterwards sent to Savannah, Blackshear, and 
Thomasville. On the 20th of December, 1864, we were 
started on foot for Albany— a killing march on the 
frozen ground, barefooted and nearly naked — and on 
December 25 were again placed in Andersonville where 
we remained until March 25, 1865. 

We afterwards crossed the Black river to the neutral 
ground in rear of Vicksburg, Miss., on the 1st of April, 
having taken an oath at Jackson, Miss., not to leave 
until duly exchanged (do not know whether 1 was 
exchanged or not). I left there for home April 25th 
on the steamer "Sultana.'' I was suffering with diar- 
rhea and scurvy, and a short time before the explosion 
was to the rear of the boat. The men lay so thick that 
I could not see any of the deck. All was peace and no 
sign of disaster. I spoke to the engineer of how nicely 
we were going and then returned to my place on the 
deck, which was about twelve or fifteen feet forward of 
the boilers next to the guard or railing of the boat. 
Being chilly I wrapped my blanket around me, thereby 
saving myself from the scalding water when the boiler 
exploded. Wm. Brown of my company lay next to me 
and was lost. Also one of Company M of the 5th regi- 
ment who was next to him. All of those around me 
were scalded. 

I remained on the boat until the fire drove the most 
of us off of the bow of the boat into the water. I 
threw a barrel into the river, but some one got it. 
Men were thick in the river. I jumped as far as I 
could, but someone caught hold of my feet and I kicked 
Jbim off, I was yery weak, but an expert swimmer. I 



96 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

secured a small piece of board about four inches by 
three feet which someone threw into the river. I had 
taken off all my clothes except my drawers and vest ; in 
the latter was a diary and pictures of my wife and girls; 
these I saved. I did not try to swim, but floated about 
four miles, heading for the bank of the river. Getting 
into a clump of four or five small cottonwood trees I 
managed to get most of them bent down and stood on 
them up to my waist in the water. Once in awhile, 
losing my hold, I would get a ducking. I was on the 
Arkansas side of the river and the land was so over- 
flown there was no getting to hard ground. I was 
rescued by the gunboat, ''Pocahontas/' at 9 a. m., and 
was so used up that I had to be lifted into the yawl 
by the sailors. Some ladies were on the gunboat who 
gave us shirts and drawers. It looked at the lauding, 
at Memphis, as though all the vehicles in town were 
there to take us to the hospitals, etc. I was taken to the 
Washington Hospital, and after getting some new 
clothes was sent to '* Camp Chase," Ohio, and from 
there I received a furlough (by order of the Secretary 
of War), and went home. I was mustered out of the 
service, July 5, 1865, at Detroit, Mich. 

Since that time I have resided at Milford, Oakland 
county, Mich., and am completely broken-down, so that 
I have to live on my pension. I was a sash and door 
maker in factories. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 97 

GEORGE M. CLINGER. 

T WAS born at Chester, now Maysville, Ky., August 
* 4, 1844. Enlisted at Camp Kenton, Ky., in the 
service of the United States, October 13, 1861, as a cor- 
poral in Company E, 16th Kentucky Infantry. Was 
captured November 30, 1864, at Spring Hill, Tenn., near 
Franklin, Tenn., and taken to Cahaba, Ala., and was 
confined until the water rose to four feet deep in the 
prison; not one foot of dry ground was seen for six days. 
A steamer arrived from Selma, loaded with artillery for 
Mobile; she was ordered to halt at the prison, where we 
waded out and crawled on to the deck. We started 
down the Alabama river to Mobile as we were told, but 
on account of the heavy fighting we had to turn back. 
We then went up the Tombigbee river to Gainesville, 
where we were taken off and marched to Big Black 
river, back of Vicksburg, Miss>, where we camped on 
neutral ground until the 24th of April, 1865. We 
received orders to pack up, which occupation did not 
take long for there was not much to pack. We were 
put on board the steamer "Sultana" while they were 
patching the boiler, and I heard the captain of the 
boat tell the quartermaster not to put any more on, as 
he had a load already. 

We were driven on like so many hogs until every 
foot of standing room was occupied. We proceeded up 
the big Mississippi. As you all know, the river was 
out of the banks, and the levees were all overflowed. 
We stopped at a town called Helena, in Arkansas, 
where a photograph was taken of our steamer with 
about 2,300 souls on board. We arrived at Memphis, 
13 



98 LOSS OF THE StJLTANA. 

Tenn., on the evening of the 26th of April where we 
unloaded some hogsheads of sugar and other freight, 
and about one o'clock in the morning of the 27th we 
left the coal bins on our journey home as we were told. 
All were in good spirits to think of going home to see 
loved ones; some of us had not seen either for 
more than two years. 

About two or half -past two o'clock in the morning 
the awful explosion took place. I was sleeping with 
comrade Wilison of my company, next to the wheel- 
house, aft the boat on the Tennessee side. The wheel- 
house broke loose and I came near going down with it. 
That was the last I ever saw of Comrade Wilison. As 
nearly all were trying to get to the Tennessee side I did 
not see any chance to be saved there, so I went to the 
Arkansas side and jumped overboard and started away 
from the burning boat with George Proper, I think, 
and had swam until we got sight of the trees when I 
came across a small window shutter. I had not gone 
far when a man near me called for help for he was 
drowning. I shoved the shutter to him and by this 
means his life was saved. He was picked up with me 
by the steamer ^' Silver Spray." He was a captain, I 
believe, and belonged to the 2nd Michigan Cavalry. 
He made me give him my name, company, regiment 
and place of residence, and said he would visit me as I 
was the means of saving his life — that is the last I saw 
or heard of him. 

We were taken back to Memphis, Tenn., where we 
were treated very kindly by the ladies of the Sanitary 
Commission who gave us under-clothing so as to cover 
our nakedness. After remaining there a few days we 



LOSS OF THE SULTAiq-A. 



99 



went on board a steamer bound for Cairo, 111. From 
there we went to "Camp Chase," Ohio, thence to 
Louisville, Ky., where we were discharged from the 
service on the 17th day of June, 1865, under general 
order No. 77, current series, by Capt. Chas. Fletcher, 
Ist United States Infantry. 

Am now a brick>mason and contractor. Postoffice 
address, Maysville, Ky. 



J. S. COOK. 




T WAS born in Ireland Feb- 
ruary 15, 1842, and enlisted 
in the service of the United 
States at Cleveland, Ohio, in 
Company C, 115th Eegiment 
Ohio Volunteer Infantry Au- 
gust 20, 1864. Was captured 
near Franklin, Tenn., De- 
cembers, 1864, and confined in 
^ . ir the Anderson ville prison. On 

the 24th of April, 1865, I with 2,400 other prisoners 
of war, was put on board the steamer '^^ Sultana" at 
Vicksburg, Miss., on the Mississippi river, bound for 
Cairo, 111., and from thence to our several homes as the 
war was over. Most of us died more than a dozen 
living deaths while in prison, and looked more like 
candidates for the bone-yard than for anything else. 
Nevertheless, when we heard the news that we were 
going home and back to God's country, we felt light- 



100 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

hearted and merry as we thought of seeing our girls 
again. 

While Gen. Bangs walked down the gang-way, the 
boys following him saw the old flag floating from the 
jackstaff, they cried for joy and hugged each other like 
school girls, but alas, our joy was of short duration. 

We arrived at Memphis, Tenn., on the evening of the 
26th of April, left there the same night and steamed 
up the river. When about eight miles above Memphis 
one of the boilers exploded while most all on board 
were sleeping. What a scene of consternation! I pray 
God to never let me witness anything like it again. 
Men lying in all imaginable shapes, some crying, some 
praying, many who, perhaps, never prayed before for 
God to help them until it was too late ; some with legs 
broken, or arms smashed, and some scalded and 
mangled in all ways. Those who were not disabled 
seemed to be at a loss to know what to do. Many of 
them stuck to the burning boat until the flames drove 
them off and they went down in squads to rise no more. 
After the survivors were picked up and placed in the 
hospital at Memphis there were only six hundred, half 
of whom were nearly dead. Many of these were picked 
off of the tops of trees, as the river had overflown its 
banks so that it was ten miles wide. I, with my bunk- 
mate, J. C. Coak, was lying close to the bell on the 
hurricane deck. The smoke-stack fell on the other 
side, which crushed it down on the next deck below 
and buried us up under a lot of boards so that I thought 
for some time I could not extricate myself. When I 
got on to my feet Coak spoke to me and I answered 
him, and seeing what was the matter I turned around 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 101 

to get a board to take with me to be of use in the 
water. I looked around for Ooak, but could not see 
him and never have since. This was the saddest part 
of my experience, as he was the only son of his father 
and I had something to do with his enlisting. It so 
affected the old man and grieved him that ho died par- 
tially insane some years after. 

Now my choice was between drowning and burning to 
death. I chose the former and scrambled to the edge 
of the boat and jumped overboard into the icy cold 
water. I could not swim very much ; and floated down 
the stream about as fast as the boat so that I could see 
everything that was going on. In my voyage I came in 
contact with a large log floating down stream and got 
upon it, but found that the log wanted to be on top of 
the water only half of the time, so I gave up that ship 
and clung to the little board until almost on the verge 
of despair. The scenes of my life were passing through 
my mind and I was about to give up all hope when I 
saw down stream a dim light ; this gave me new cour- 
age. As it approached me I saw that it was a 
steamer, and as she neared me I shouted with all the 
strength of a drowning man for help. When they 
heard me they stopped and threw me a rope, by which 
I was helped on board. After I was placed in the cabin 
of the boat, a Union lady (whose name I have often 
wished I knew), took off my wet clothing, put a dry 
suit of "Uncle Sam's" clothes on me, got me up to 
the stove and made me drink two horns of whiskey, 
about fifteen minutes apart. This is the only time that 
I felt that whiskey did me any good. These kind 
actions were performed as a mother would perform a 



102 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

duty for her child. I love to think of that woman, and 
if I knew her whereabouts I would make her a visit. 



WM. CRISP. 

I WAS born in England, January, 1834, and enlisted 
^ in the service of the United States at Hillsdale, 
Mich., August, 1862, in Company D, 18th Regiment 
Michigan Volunteers. Was captured at Athens, Ala., 
September 24, 1864, and confined in the Castle Morgan, 
Cahaba, Ala., prison. 

I was put on board the '^ Sultana " at Yicksburg. 
The boiler exploded when about seven miles above 
Memphis. I was badly burned and lost the use of one 
arm ; swam three miles and a half, and got in a tree. 
I was rescued at seven a. m., April 28 (27th), 1865. 

Occupation, farming. Postofl5ce address. Silver 
Creek, Neb. 



BEN C. DAVIS. 

T WAS born in Brejen, Glamorganshire, South Wales, 
^ on the 12th of May, 1827. Enlisted in Company 
L, 7th Kentucky Cavalry. Was taken prisoner at La 
Fayette, Ga., on the 23rd day of June, 1864, under 
Col. Watkins' command, and taken to Cahaba, Ala., 
and remained there until about November, 1864. Was 
then removed to Meridian, Miss. Stayed there about 
four or five weeks, when I was taken back to Cahaba, 
Ala., and remained there until about March 20, 1865, 
when the Alabama river overflowed the country, rising 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 103 

about two feet all over the prison. We had to do our 
cooking on rafts, and a great many men were sleeping 
on them. Daring the high water a steamboat came up 
the river and took about six hundred of the prisoners 
away, they being sent to parole camp at Vicksburg, 
When the boat came in sight there was a great rush for 
it. Everybody wanted to get out of prison. There 
was a sick sergeant that belonged to my regiment, his 
name was Morris Malaley. He was not able to travel 
through the water to the boat audi undertook to carry 
him through. When I got to the stage plank the 
boat had let loose and we had to go back to the 
prison. We remained there three days, when another 
boat came and I bad to carry the sick man again, but 
this time we caught the boat and were taken to the 
parole camp. In about three weeks the " Sultana " 
came to Vicksburg and took nearly 2,300 on board to 
go to " Camp Chase," Ohio. A little above Memphis 
the boat stopped to get coal, and when everything was 
ready they started up the river. About two o'clock in 
the morning I got up to have a smoke. I went to the 
boilers to get a light for my pipe and going back to the 
hurricane deck, where I had been sleeping, I sat down 
for about ten minutes. When I got through with my 
smoke I got a canteen of water, and was about to take 
a drink when the boiler exploded and the canteen flew 
out of my hand. I never saw it again. Morris Malaley 
and myself, from Covington, Ky., John Andorf and 
Joe Moss, from Cincinnati, were sleeping under the 
same blankets, and when the explosion took place I 
thought the boat had all gone to pieces. In the con- 
usion there was no command whatever. I remained 



104 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

on the boat until the side wheel was burned clear to the 
water; by this time it was getting too hot for me 
and I let myself down to the lower deck by a rope. 
There were so many people in the water you could 
almost walk over their heads. The fire was sweeping 
through the boat so that I could not bear to stay there 
longer. I got a shutter about three feet square, and at 
this time I found Joe Moss. He begged me to let him 
have the shutter as he could not swim. I threw it into 
the river and told him to follow it, which he did; I 
never saw him again. I pulled off all my clothes 
except my shirt and jumped into the river, making 
toward the Arkansas shore. I knew I had a good 
journey before me, but got there all the same. When 
I reached the Arkansas willows I could not fiud a safe 
place, so swam about forty or fifty yards down. Here 
I found a large log fast ia the willows so I mounted it. 
I could hear so much groaning that I *^hollered" 
to them to encourage them, telling them I was on 
shore. One man, who was pretty close to me, asked 
me what regiment I belonged to. I told him to the 
7th Kentucky Cavalry, and he said, '^here's a 4th 
Michigan after you." They kept on coming till there 
were five of us on the log. I always did believe tha.t I 
was the first to land on the Arkansas shore, that morn- 
ing about half-past three o'clock a. m. Between 
eight and nine o'clock a man in a canoe 
came and picked us up, taking us down to a planta- 
tion right opposite where the hulk of the ** Sultana" 
was tied up. There I met John Andorf, one of my 
bunk-mates. I guess everyone that was on the ** Sul- 
tana" knew something about the monstrous alligator 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 105 

that was on the boat. It was nin^ and one-half feet 
long. While the boat was burning the alligator 
troubled me almost as much as the fire. 
My postoffice address is Covington, Ky. 



JOH!| DAVIS 

V\T kS born near Oj^tawa, Putnam county, Ohio, 
October 26^ 1840. When about one year old was 
•moved to Ayersville, Defiance county, Ohio, which has 
been his home till the present. He enlisted July 30, 
1862, in Company D, 100th Regiment Ohio Volunteer 
Infantry. Took part in the battles of Rocky Face 
Ridge, Resaca, Dallas, Utoy Creek, Atlanta, Columbia 
and Franklin. Was slightly wounded at the battle of 
Resaca, and was captured at the battle of Franklin on 
November 30, 1864. Was confined at first at Meridian, 
Miss., but was soon removed to Andersonville, Ga., and 
finally taken from there and placed on neutral ground 
in the rear of Vicksburg, Miss., till sent north with 
other exchanged prisoners on the ill-fated steamer 
''Sultana." 

At the time of the explosion wa^ sleeping on boiler 
deck within fifteen or twenty feet of the stern door. 
Had as bunk mates A. W. King, Wm. Wheeler, George 
Hill and James A. Fleming. The last named was lost, 
as well as Valmore Lambert who was on cabin deck 
over the boilers. 

After the explosion he reached the stern door in a 
rather suffocating condition, but was not much injured 
by the explosion, and remained upon the boat until 



106 LOBS OF THE SULTANA. 

driven off by the flames. The river was very high and 
the water icy cold. Was in the water at least two 
or three hours, but was finally picked up by a boat sent 
to the rescue. When taken into the boat could not 
stand alone and was perfectly prostrated. Was put to 
bed in the cabin of the boat and carried to Memphis. 
Kemaining in Memphis two or three days was then 
sent by steamer to Cairo, 111., thence by rail to Colum- 
bus, Ohio, and there discharged by special telegraphic 
order from the War Department. 
Postoffice address is Ayersville, Ohio. 



L. A. DEERMAN. 

J WAS born August 11, 1837. I enlisted in the serv- 
* ice of the United States on the Ist of February, 
1864, at Nashville, Tenn., in Company K, of the 3rd 
Regiment of Tennessee Cavalry. I remained at Nash- 
ville until the 18th of June, 1864, then started for 
Athens, Ala., and arrived at that point on the 20th of 
June, 1864, as well as I can remember at the present 
time. We went into camp and remained there until 
the 25th of September, 1864, when I was captured at 
the battle of Sulphur Branch Trestle, which is six 
miles above Athens. 

Cahaba was the next point. It was an awful one, too, 
when I arrived there, but I must come back to the 
night before I arrived at Cahaba . One of my friends 
and I made our escape by jumping from a flat car, 
about ten o'clock p. m., at a place about ten miles 
above Selma, Ala., in the swamps — the darkest and 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 107 

lonesomest place that I ever saw. We stopped close 
by the place where we leaped from the car until morn- 
ing, then we started out, wading the water that was in 
the swamp. The water kept growing deeper and 
deeper until it compelled us to change our course and 
we soon arrived at a large farm. It being cloudy and 
foggy we soon lost our course and traveled around at 
random about one hour. The sun shone out and we 
found that we had been lost. We stopped to rest until 
night, but in a short time our rest was disturbed by 
the barking of dogs and " hollering" of men. They 
soon came upon us. There were five dogs and two men. 
We surrendered, of course, as we had nothing by which 
we could defend ourselves. We were then carried to 
Selma, Ala., and from there to Cahaba prison, arriving 
there about the first of October, 1864. I remained 
there until the 6th of March, 1865, but my friend 
made his escape from the prison before this and suc- 
ceeded in reaching Nashville, Tenn. I was taken on 
board a boat bound for Vicksburg, Miss., on the 6th 
of March, 1865, arriving there about the 18th or 19th 
of March, 1865. To the best of my recollection I 
remained there until about the 24th or 25th of April. 

From Vicksburg I went aboard of the great steamer 
'* Sultana." Late in the evening she pulled out and 
landed at Memphis, Tenn., to unload sugar, leaving 
there the evening of the 26th, or morning of the 27th 
of April. As I had been up all of the previous night 
and had not had any rest or sleep, two or three of the 
boys and myself went half way back on the deck and 
made us a good bed out of our blankets and went to 
bed like white people, as we had not done for some time 



108 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

prior. I never knew when the hoat left Memphis, nor 
did I know anything until about three o'clock next 
morning, when the noise of the explosion awoke me 
from my dreams. The first thing I knew I was standing 
on my feet looking, listening, and thinking what in the 
world is the matter now? I soon found out what was 
the matter. I turned and looked and saw one of the 
smoke stacks lying in front of me. I saw at once that 
it was torn to fragments, aad such screaming and yell- 
ing was never heard. By this time nearly everybody 
was in the water swimming for life. I saw that I would 
soon have something to do. One of my messmates 
that went to bed with me that night came up to me 
with a board which was one and one-half inches by ten 
inches and eight feet long, and said, '* Lewis, I can't 
swim a lick, do you think this will be of any good?" 
I replied, " Yes," and picked up a short board about 
three feet long and said to him, " Come on, I will help 
you all I can." I jumped into the water, holding on 
to my board and told Frank to put his board in and 
" I will hold on to it until you get on ; you stay on one 
end of the board and kick with your feet, and don't let 
anyone get on with you if you can help it." He did 
so. I gave him a start and got him out from among 
the crowd. He made it all right and was the first 
man I saw the next morning with whom I was 
acquainted. I went on and on swimming for my life 
on my short board. It seemed to me that I was in the 
water about an hour and a half. While I was in the 
water I struck an old log; one end of it was hanging 
to something and the other end was floating about in 
the water. I caught hold of the end of it and pulled 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 109 

myself upon the log and here remained until eight 
o'clock in the morning. I could hear the boys, all up 
and down the river banks on logs, bushes and drift, 
smacking and rubbing themselves to keep warm, and 
crowing like chickens while many a poor boy was sink- 
ing or floating in the deep waters of the Mississippi. 
Oh! this was so unexpected to that crew that night. 

We were carried back to Memphis and remained 
there ten days, and then we took a boat and started for 
Cairo, 111., and from thence to '* Camp Chase," Ohio. 
We remained at this place a few days and from here 
went to Nashville, Tenn., where we remained until the 
loth of June, 1865, when I was discharged. 

I was a farmer when I enlisted in the service and am 
still trying to farm. I live in St. Clair, Ala., near 
Steel's depot on the A. G. S. railroad. 



J. W. DUNSMORE. 

T ENLISTED in the service of the United States at 
* Ionia, Ionia county, Mich,, December 25, 1863, in 
Company I, 1st Regiment Michigan Engineers and 
Mechanics, and joined the regiment at Bridgeport, 
Tenn. Was captured at a small place called Ackworth, 
August 8, 1864, and taken to the Cahaba prison. In 
March I was taken to Vicksburg and put on board the 
''Sultana." Her boiler exploded when about ten 
miles above Memphis. At the time H. C. Aldrich and 
myself were lying on one of the upper decks, near the 
starboard wheel-house. He said, *' What shall I do, I 
cannot swim?" 1 replied, " You have got to." I got two 



110 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

blinds for him from a window and he went overboard. 
I followed him as quickly as possible. While I was 
swimming for dear life, a man called to me and asked 
for a chew of tobacco. I started to awim for the tim- 
ber and was caught in an eddy and nearly drowned. 
When I got out of it I could see the lights of Mem- 
phis, but could not reach the dock, and finally was 
pulled out by a colored guard at Fort Pickens. Was 
sent from there to "Camp Chase," Ohio, and was 
given a furlough. I was discharged at Detroit, June, 
1865. 

Occupation, farming. Postoffice address, Harrison, 
Clare county, Mich. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 



Ill 




■-^^ 



J. WALTER ELLIOTT. 

T WAS born in South Hanover, Ind., March 22, 1833, 
^ and enlisted in the service of the United States at 
La Fayette, Ind,, April 18, 1861, in Company E, 10th 
Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and promoted 
as captain, in Company F, 44:th Regiment, United 
States Colored Troops, in July, 1864 ; was captured 
near Nashville, Tenn., December 2, 1864, and confined 
in the Cahaba, Ala., and Andersonville, Ga., prisons. 
I have seen death's carnival in the yellow-fever and 
the cholera-stricken city, on the ensanguined field, in 
hospital and prison, and on the rail ; I have, with wife 



112 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

and children clinging in terror to my knees, wrestled 
with the midnight cyclone ; but the most horrible of all 
were the sights and sounds of that hour. The prayers, 
shrieks and groans of strong men and helpless women 
and children are still ringing in my ears, and the re- 
membrance makes me shudder. The sight of 2,000 
ghostly, pallid faces upturned in the chilling waters of 
the Mississippi, as I looked down on them from the 
boat, is a picture that haunts me in my dreams. But 
to the narrative. Where shall I begin? Memory with 
faultless faithfulness, reproduces a thousand pictures 
of the dark days of the winter of 1864-5. 

Captured and paroled in October; ordered on duty 
without exchange, and again captured while trying to 
steal through Hood^s lines at Nashville on December 
2, 1864, I knew full well that a recognition would be 
swiftly followed by a drumhead court-martial and my 
execution. Therefore I assumed the name and com- 
mand of one Capt. David E. Elliott, of Company E, 
75th Indiana, who I knew was with Sherman on his 
march to the sea, and never until I had shaken the 
dust of the confederacy from my feet did I disclose my 
identity to friend or foe — and the sixty autograph 
albums gotten up by my companions in Castle Reed 
will attest it. 

Shall I tell of the march over ice and snow ; the 
wading of deep streams from Nashville to Dixon, two 
miles below Cherokee, on the Memphis & Charleston 
railroad ; the suffering from cold and exposure in the 
dead of winter, and from hunger, when I bought a 
bushel of corn meal for thirty-two dollars in greenbacks, 
and then eating not half what I craved, but dividing 



LOSS OF THE SULTAKA. 113 

with my fellows ; of seeing a wagon load of corn on the 
ear, driven into the prison-corral and thrown out to us 
as though we were a lot of fattening hogs ; of the num- 
ber of dead we left on the ground next morning, 
killed by eating raw corn after a four days' fast; of my 
confinement, without food, for a day and night in a 
close, crowded box-car, in which fresh horse dung was 
half a foot deep; of the indignities, the humiliations 
and cruelties heaped upon us by cowards playing Pro- 
vost Marshal ; of our sojourn at Cahaba, Ala. ; of our 
removal from that purgatory to that hell of hells at 
Andersonville, presided over and improved upon daily 
by his Satanic Majesty's most loyal representative on 
earth, Oapt. Wirz, ably assisted by his brothers of 
royal blood, who were kenneled, fed and guarded by 
one of the 0. S. A.'s most trusted lieutenants, with a 
picked command, scarcely second to the historic Old 
Guard? Oh I the long and dreary winter in prison; the 
suffering from cold, hunger, and the petty tyranny of 
cowards clothed with a little brief authority; the stench 
of rotten meat, of which we had not half enough to eat ; 
the bitter, bitter feeling that our country had aban- 
doned us to our fate, refusing to exchange because it 
would be exchanging able-bodied soldiers for us who 
were starved until we could be of no service. 

How day by day, through long weary weeks each of 
us watched his fellows slowly but surely starving to 
death, and already mourned as dead by fond loved ones 
at home. **Get ready for exchange," came the order. 
Oh! the joyous shout that made the castle walls ring 
out. How each of us laughed and cried, shook hands 
with and hugged his fellows, and joining hands in a 
16 



114 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

circle, in good old Methodist campmeeting-altar style, 
as we all joined in singing '* Rally Round the Flag, 
Boys." The joy of that good hour more than repaid 
for all past tribulations. 

Sixty-five officers formed in line awaiting orders. 
"Behold death on a pale horse," says that grand old 
soldier, Gen. Noble, of Bridgeport, Conn., as Capt. 
Wirz enters the stockade on a white pony. At 
the cars we joined some 500 privates from the 
stockade, and a more pitiable sight city life in its 
worst phases never disclosed. All were begrimed and 
blackened by exposure, without a pretense of protection 
from summer's sun or winter's rain; all weak and 
lean from starvation; many, too feeble to take care 
of themselves, were literally encased in scales, beneath 
which were myriads of living vermin eating all vitality 
away. Two I saw doubled up and scarred all over, 
having been literally torn in pieces by the dogs, because 
they attempted to escape from the devil's domain. 

We left a good many poor fellows dead along our 
entire route. Thrice derailed, twice we had two cars 
wrecked, crippling a good number of the boys. On 
March 26 we hailed the glorious flag of our country as 
it floated on the breeze. Tears flowed at sight of that 
proud emblem, while Big Black river, Jordan-like, 
divided the forlorn C. S. A. from our Canaan. We 
crossed ; we gathered at the river ; we sang and danced 
and rested under the shade of the trees. Out from the 
gates of hell — out from the jaws of death — going home. 

On our arrival at prison camp, six miles in rear of 
Vicksburg, we received a glorious welcome and invita- 
tion to "take something;" that is, we were taken to 



LOSS OF THE SULTA]S^A. 115 

the Commissary, where barrel after barrel of pickled 
cabbage was rolled out and the heads knocked in, and 
we, marching round and round, gobbled out and rav- 
enously devoured the cabbage and licked the vinegar 
from our fingers, the sweetest dainty to my bleeding 
gums that ever I tasted. We feasted on pickles. 

Next day we exchanged our filthy rags for clean 
clothing, wrote home, rested and feasted. About 2,500 
embarked on the Sultana for St Louis, together with a 
good many passengers, crowded, jammed and packed 
on all the decks and guards and in the cabin. But 
what cared the survivors of Andersonville — the war 
was over and we were going home. 

Nothing unusual occurred until we reached Mem- 
phis, although I had suffered much from fear of the 
boys crowding to one side of the boat and capsizing 
her. One instance in particular : While at Helena a 
photographer was ''taking" the boat, and each sol- 
dier seemed to be bent on having his face discernible 
in the picture. I entreated and exhorted prudence, 
while I sat on the roof, my feet pendant and my hands 
on a float, momentarily expecting a capsizing and 
sinking. 

Eacn night the cabin was filled with a row of double- 
deck cots. I had been fortunate in securing one of 
these, but on the night previous to reaching Memphis, 
I suddenly conceived and executed the purpose of 
making a stranger, whose name 1 never knew — our 
Commissary Sergeant in parole camp — occupy my cot 
while I spent the night in a chair. 

The boat lay at the Memphis wharf discharging 
freight, and the cots were being placed, when my 



116 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

friend of the night before came to me and asked if I 
had a cot. I pointed to my hat, placed on one to hold 
it. He said that one was in a hot, unpleasant and 
dangerous place over the boilers, and that he had 
reserved one for me in the ladies* cabin ; that I had 
my way the night before, and he must have his way 
now. 

"Give it to some poor fellow who had none last 
night," I said; but a moment afterwards he came and 
told me he had removed my hat to the cot selected by 
him, and that I would have to take that or none. Soon 
I retired to the cot, read until weary, fell asleep, was 
partly aroused by the boat leaving the wharf a little 
after midnight, but relapsed into sweet slumber, dream- 
ng of the loved ones at home — a motherless daughter, 
a noble christian mother, two devoted sisters, and my 
brothers. How I reveled in the joy of the reunion. 

A report as of the discharge of a park of artillery, 
a shock as of a railroad collision, and I am sitting bolt 
upright, straining my eyes and stretching my arms out 
into the Egyptian darkness; face, throat and lungs 
burning as if immersed in a boiling cauldron. Crash, 
crash fall the chimneys on the roof ! Oh, that I could 
shake off this horrible nightmare ! But now from all 
around rise shrieks, cries, prayers and groans. Have 
I awakened in the dark regions of the lost? I spring 
to my feet, hastily dress, start forward, groping my 
way between the state-room doors and the cots, to learn 
what has happened. 

Suddenly I find a yawning opening in the floor. I 
pause in doubt and uncertainty for a second, when the 
scene lights up from below, disclosing a picture that 



LOSS OF THE SULTAKA. 117 

beggars all description — mangled, scalded human 
forms heaped and piled amid the burning debris on the 
lower deck. The cabin, roof and texas are cut in 
twain ; the broken planks on either side of the break 
projecting downward, meeting the raging flames and 
lifting them to the upper decks. 

Women and little children in their night clothes, 
brave men who have stood undaunted on many a bat- 
tle field, all contribute to the confusion and horror of 
the scene as they suddenly see the impending death by 
fire, and wringing their hands, tossing their arms 
wildly in the air, with cries most heart-rending, they 
rush pell-mell over the guard into the dark, cold waters 
of the river; while the ''old soldier" is hastily pro- 
viding for himself anything that will float — tables, 
doors, cots, partition planks — anything, everything. 
What a worse than Babel of confusion of sights and 
sounds as each seeks his own safety, regardless of others. 
Where is the cot of my selection a few hours previous, 
and where its occupant? Ask of that holocaust below. 
" There is a divinity that shapes our ends.'^ 

"Captain, will you please help me?" 

I turned in the direction of the voice so polite, 
so cool and calm amid this confusion. There, 
on the head of the last cot on this side of the breach, 
which was covered with pieces of the wreck, sat a man, 
bruised, cut, scalded in various places, both ankles 
broken and bones protruding. With his suspenders 
he had improvised tourniquets for both legs, to prevent 
bleeding to death. 

" I am powerless to help you ; I can't swim," I replied. 



118 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

But he answered, *' Throw me in the river is all I ask ; 
I shall burn to death here." 

I called Capt. Chapman of LaFayette, whom I never 
saw afterward, and we bore McLoyd aft and threw him 
overboard. I then got hold of a life-preserver for my- 
self just as a frightened maiden in nightgown only 
rushed past me. I seized her as she was leaping from 
the guard and called the chambermaid, who put my 
life-preserver on the girl. I then had no chance for 
escape, as I thought, and death seemed inevitable. 

I worked and toiled to my very utmost to assist 
others, until all was done that I could do. Then the 
thought occurred to me that it was my duty to make 
an effort to save myself. I saw two Kentuckians meet, 
each lamenting that he could not swim. '* Then let 
us die together," said one. '"Well," replied the other, 
and, embraced in each other's arms, they leaped, sank, 
and the muddy waters closed over them. I saw others, 
blinded by the explosion, leap into the fire and die. 

I now cast about me for something I could use as a 
buoy, but everything available seemed to have been 
appropriated. I tried to improvise a life-preserver 
out of a stool. I threw a mattress overboard; it 
floated and was at once caught on to by several who 
were struggling in the water. I got another mattress, 
and slipping down a fender onto the taffrail I dropped 
it, but it no sooner touched the water than four men 
seized it, turned it over, and it went under as I 
jumped. Down, down I went into the chilly waters. 
Some poor drowning wretch was clutching at my legs, 
but putting my hands down to release myself and vig- 
orously treading water, I rose strangling to the sur- 



LOSS OF THE SULTAlifA. 119 

face, my scalded throat and lungs burning with pain. 
The mattress was within reach, with only one claim- 
ant. God only knows what had become of the three 
others. Placing my arms on the support I began a 
life-and-death struggle to escape from the falling 
wheel-house, which I barely succeeded in doing, but 
its waves strangled me and came near sweeping my 
companion off. There seemed to be acres of struggling 
humanity on the waters, some on debris of the wreck, 
some on the dead carcasses of horses, some holding to 
swimming live horses, some on boxes, bales of hay, 
drift logs, etc. Soon we parted company with the 
wreck and the crowd and drifted out into the darkness 
almost alone. 

A boat — the Gen. Boynton — passed near, whistled 
and hove to, but finding her efforts at rescue futile, 
she steamed away and gave the alarm at Memphis, and 
the gunboats and steamers there sent out lifeboats and 
yawls to pick up those floating by from seven miles 
above. Having floated nearly five miles we struck a 
small drift that seemed stationary, and that I correctly 
thought was on the overflowed Arkansas shore. I 
crawled upon a large floating tree. Chilled and 
benumbed, I could not sit up. I had three large doses 
of quinine in my pocket, took them all at once, and by 
vigorous rubbing soon was able to stand and walk. 
Meantime my companion was helpless, and could not 
get onto my drift. I held the mattress to the drift, 
and with a keen switch I struck the man— who, by the 
way, was dressed in but one garment, and that a very 
brief one — and striking first one place, then another, 
he begging piteously all the while and rubbing where 



120 LOSS OF THE SULTAKA. 

I struck — I hope he has forgiveD me that whipping — I 
soon had him up, and together we pulled one young 
woman and two men out of the water, who soon chilled 
to death in spite of all we could do for them. 

Shivering with cold, silently we paced back and 
forth on that floating cypress. Minutes seemed hours, 
as we kept our lonely vigil over the lifeless form of 
that beautiful girl and of the two brave men who had 
passed the perils of field and prison only to die in this 
way just when all danger seemed past. There was no 
sound to break the oppressive silence save the plashing 
of the cruel waters and the gurgling moan of a poor 
fellow who had clasped his broken, scalded arms over 
a scantling and drifted, with his mouth jast above the 
water, and lodged near us, dying. An occasional fee- 
ble cry of distress near by on the river side, was an- 
swered by voices up the bank. Oh, would morning 
never dawn on night so hideous? 

At last the sun, as if reluctant to light the scene of 
horror, slowly disclosed to my view the poor wretch 
clinging in unconsciousness to the floating scantling, 
who immediately expired when taken from the water. 
There were also to be seen some half dozen soldiers on 
the roof of a cabin above us, and here and there a chilled 
half-frozen soldier clinging to the branches of a tree 
or perched on a bit of floating drift; but my attention 
was devoted especially to a man some forty yards from 
me on the river side, clinging to a pole or upright snag, 
worn smooth by the waters. When first 1 made him 
out his feet were above the water, and he was climbing 
with all the strength he had to reach a projecting snag 
to rest thereon ; but failing, he stopped, then slipped 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 121 

gradually, inch by inch, down the pole until his feet 
were beneath the water. Again he tried to reach the 
rest above, falling short of the point before reached. 
So periodically climbing and falling back, each time 
he sank lower and failed to climb as high as before. 
At last he had to throw his head back to keep his chin 
above water, and, climbing, he failed to get his waist 
out of the flood. 

Only a few minutes and he will make his last futile 
effort and the lifeless body will be borne away on the 
muddy tide. Oh, how I wish I could swim ! Now 
comes a Confederate soldier in a batteau, from his 
camp not far inland. I hail him and send him in 
haste to the rescue. With great effort, and danger to 
himself, he drags the stiffened and almost lifeless body 
from that pole and bears it to a place of security on 
the log-cabin roof, where with vigorous rubbing the 
boys soon ''bring him round.'' Here and there goes 
that batteau taking the imperiled to places of safety. 

And now the Jenny Lind — a little steamer from 
Memphis — comes, and ** Johnny" puts his passengers 
on board, taking them from cabin-roof, drifts and trees; 
myself the last one in sight. At the boat Lieut. Mc- 
Oord, of Bellevue, 0, our ''Susan" of Castle Reed — 
pulls me on board, and in the joy of the meeting we 
for the moment forget the loss of many of our brave 
companions. If "Susan" still lives, I wonder if he 
ever laughs over my giving him my red flannel drawers 
and of his promenade with me through Memphis to the 
Quartermaster's, barefoot and clad only in red shirt 
and drawers. 

Just after boarding the boat, I saw a "dugout/' 



122 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

paddled by a citizen, coming out of the woods, and in 
the bottom there lay McLoyd. I helped lift him on 
board and lay him ou deck and gave him a tumbler of 
whisky. When I left Memphis he was in the hospital 
there, and I know not whether he survived, but rather 
think he did. 

But what had become of my chivalrous knight of 
the gray? How he dignified *' the gray." Silently he 
had disappeared when his good work was done, with 
that modesty inseparable from true royalty of heart. 
Would that I knew his name. 

Reaching Memphis I met young Safford, of North 
Madison, Ind., whose father had joined us at Vicks- 
burg as a Sanitary Commissioner. The father's arms 
were both badly scalded, and he was otherwise injured. 
The son put two life preservers on his father and one 
on himself, and they hastily got upon a state-room 
door in the water. A horse leaping from the boat 
struck the door, knocking them off and separating 
them. The son was taken up unconscious opposite 
Memphis by the life-boat from the *' Essex" and now 
restored he was inquiring and searching for his father. 
Together he and I opened more than a hundred coffins 
on the wharf, hoping to have the satisfaction of giving 
him a burial, that his body should not be lodged on 
some bar to become food for fishes. 

Then together we visited the office of a morning 
paper, where I for the first time gave my real name and 
command. Here we met Erwin, a United States scout, 
who had been the senior Safford's companion and he 
gave the young man his father's watch, a very valu- 
able gold one, and told us that Mr. Safford had been 



LOSS OF THE SULTAN'A. 123 

discovered and rescued in an unconscious state by some 
negroes on President's Island, having floated twelve 
miles. 

The son took the first boat for the island, where he 
found his father as had been told him, and took him 
to Madison some days after. 

I, with a number of surviving officers, was sent to 
quarters at a hospital. I was sent for that afternoon 
by Mrs. Hartsock of Illinois, aunt of my deceased wife, 
who had seen my name in the paper. Soon I joined 
her at the fort below. 

When I returned to the city the second day after- 
ward I was hailed at every turn, *' Captain, they have 
left us. You must get transportation for us and take 
us home." So I gathered up the boys— all who were 
able to be moved, about 250— and shipped them for 
Cairo. We had a dozen or more scalded men laid on 
the cabin floor, and nursed them. At Cairo I placed 
the well in barracks and the wounded in hospitals for 
the jiight. I succeeded next day in getting cars, by 
which we arrived at Mattoon at early dawn of the day 
following. We had had nothing to eat for twenty-four 
hours, and there was no way to feed the men. Citizens 
crowded around to see the heroes of the great disaster, 
who, at my request, took the boys to their homes and 
breakfasted them. 

Then came trouble about cars. If cars should be 
sent thence to Indianapolis they would be kept for 
debt owing by one road to the other, but on my per- 
sonal pledge to return the coaches we got them, which 
pledge the superintendent at Indianapolis cheerfully 
redeemed. 



124 LOSS OF THE SULTAKA. 

From Mattoon I wired the mayor of Terre Haute, 
and also Governor Morton. Terre Haute gave us a 
dinner worthy of my grand old native State. At 
Indianapolis we found ambulances in waiting for the 
disabled, and a good supper prepared for all. Here I 
surrendered my charge, and, completely worn out by 
my watching and nursing on the river and rail, I 
stopped at the first inn I found, that of an English- 
man, on Dlinois street, near the Union depot, who 
generously tendered the hospitalities of his house to 
me and my companions. 

My present occupation is farming and fruit-growing. 
Postoffice address, Arba, Ala. 



WILLIAM FIES. 

(Adjutant National "■ SuUaTia'''' Survivors* Association.) 

T WAS born in Ellmendingen, Baden, Germany, 
^October 17, 1841. My parents emigrated to the 
United States in the year 1847, and located in New 
York city, from which place we removed to Marion, 
Ohio, in the month of September, 1852. At the age 
of seventeen years I was apprenticed to learn the trade of 
cabinet making. On the 30th day of October, 1861, I 
enlisted as a private in Company B, 64th Kegiment 
Ohio Volunteer Infantry, at Marion, Ohio; was 
appointed corporal November 16, 1862, and was pro- 
moted to sergeant April 1, 1864. I served with the 
company and regiment until January, 1864, when I 
re-enlisted at Blain's X Roads, East Tennessee, for 
three years longer, and was re-mustered January 27, 




WILLIAM FIES. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 125 

1864, in Company B, 64th Regiment Ohio Volunteer 
Infantry, participating in all the campaigns, battles 
and skirmishes, with the company and regiment, ex- 
cept the battle of Chickamauga, at which time I was on 
detached duty and engaged in recruiting service. 

I was taken a prisoner with five others of my com- 
pany at the battle of Franklin, Tenn., Nov. 30, 1864; 
marched the next day to Columbia, Tenn., and after 
being held there a few days, we were marched with 
about 1800 other prisoners to Corinth, Miss., Selma 
and Montgomery, Ala., finally reaching Meridian, 
Miss., where we were confined for a few days in a stock- 
ade. When we reached this place most of us were in a 
deplorable condition, having marched several hundred 
miles over bad roads, in the winter season, with scanty 
clothing and scantier rations ; a great many were bare- 
footed, and a number were sick. We were shipped 
from here to Andersonville, Ca. I will not attempt a 
description of this hell on earth; nearly all have read 
descriptions of it. On March 26, 1865, I, with several 
hundred others, was taken out of the prison, and 
finally, after a tedious journey, partly by rail and the 
rest of the distance on foot, we reached and were 
encamped on the Big Black river, near Vicksburg, 
Miss. On the 23d or 24th of April, (according to the 
records of the War Department) 1865, paroled union 
prisoners of war, of which number I was one, were 
loaded on board of the ill-fated steamboat, "Sultana," 
at Vicksburg, Miss., more like so many cattle than 
men, which, together with the passengers and crew, 
made in all about 2,021 souls, besides a freight cargo, 
making in all a cargo of several times the carrying 



126 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

capacity of the boat, and were headed up the river, our 
destination being Cairo, 111. 

The '*Sultana" landed at Memphis, Tenn., on the 
evening of April 26, where a portion of her cargo of 
freight was discharged. Some time during that night 
the boat left the wharf at Memphis and steamed up the 
river, making a landing to take on coal. Before we 
left Memphis my bunk-mate, comrade A. 0. Oranmer, 
of my company, and I fixed down our bed on the cabin 
deck and on the starboard side near the railing. I remem- 
ber, just before I fell asleep, Captain Mason, in com- 
mand of the boat, came up from below, to go to his 
stateroom I presume, and was compelled to crawl 
around on the rail, as the deck was so crowded with 
men lying down that he could not find room to step, 
and was in consequence made the subject of several 
jokes. After this incident I fell asleep, and did not 
wake up until after the explosion, which occurred 
about two o'clock a. m., at which time I was brought 
to my senses by some water which was thrown over me 
by some one on the hurricane deck. When I came to 
my senses I found myself standing on a part of the 
wreck, in front of and near the starboard wheel house, 
surrounded by wreckage,, and in the midst of smoke 
and fire. The agonizing shrieks and groans of the 
injured and dying were heart rending, and the stench 
of burning flesh was intolerable and beyond my power 
of description. I was not aware at that time that the 
boilers had exploded, but thought the boat had caught 
on fire. 

Judging from the injuries I received I must have 
been knocked senseless by the explosion, as I found the 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 127 

left side of my face bruised and bleeding, my left hand 
badly scalded, and my left shoulder disabled, which 
afterwards proved to be a very bad dislocation. When I 
took in the situation, and saw the dangerous place I 
was in, I took held of an iron brace rod near me which 
was so hot that it actually blistered my hands, and 
scrambled onto the hurricane deck, where I found a 
number of men trying to extinguish the fire by throw- 
ing water with buckets. From them I first learned 
that the boilers had exploded. From there I slid down 
a rope to the bow of the boat, carrying with me a small 
wooden box, which I thought might become useful to 
me in case I was compelled to take to the water. I 
changed my mind, however, and threw it aside. I saw 
a number of men bringing from the hold empty cracker 
barrels and jumping overboard with them, but I saw 
they were worse than useless in keeping the heads of 
the men above water, having only one head in them 
they would not balance. Just at this time the stage 
plank was lowered from its hangings and about as many 
as could get a hold of it were trying to launch it, first 
on one side then on the other, finally it went overboard 
carrying with it a great number, but as it was heavily 
bound with iron it sank, and must have carried down 
with it a great many who had a hold of it and others 
who were struggling in the water to keep afloat and 
save themselves. 

Seeing now that all other means of escape were cut 
off, I began to look around for something to save 
myself with, as it was now apparent the fire was fast gain- 
ing headway, and would soon burn through the slight 
barrier formed by portions of the upper decks which 



128 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

had fallen down, and which had up to this time kept 
most of the flames from reaching those of us who were 
on the bow of the boat. Just at ihis time I saw Rob- 
ert White, a member of mj regiment, standing with 
one arm around the flag staff, looking on the strug- 
gling mass of humanity in the water below him. As I 
knew he had followed steamboating before the war, I 
thought he might be able to give me some advice. I 
went to him aud said, '^Bob, what is to be done.'^" and 
all he said was: *' Billy, I guess we will all be drowned 
or burned up.'' I was of the same opinion, but made 
up my mind to at least make an effort for my life, in 
which I was successful, while poor Bob was either 
drowned or burned up as he predicted, for I never saw 
him again. 

After this incident I went aft a short distance to 
find, if possible, something that would keep my head 
above water, but all I could find was some splinters of 
boards ; everything else had been taken, even to a box 
which had contained a live alligator. I had picked up 
a piece of rope with which I tied the splinters together 
into a convenient bundle. About this time the fire 
had burned through the wreckage, and it became 
apparent that those of us who were still on board 
would either be compelled to jump overboard or burn 
up. I chose the former, and went over with my 
bundle and sank a few feet under water. I rose to 
the surface and about this time some other fellow, who 
I thought must have weighed at least 200 pounds, came 
down on top of me and knocked me under again. 
When I again came to the surface my bundle of splint- 
ers was gone, and I was just about gone myself as some 



LOSS OF THE SULTAKA. 129 

other fellow had taken a hold of me, but I kicked him 
loose. Notwithstanding my disabled condition and 
being at best only a poor swimmer, I managed to keep 
my head above water at least a part of the time, and 
get away from the mass of men struggling for life. 

When I was just about exhausted and thought my 
time had come, I came to a fellow with a nice large 
board. He was the only occupant but I saw at once 
that he was very much excited and was not making 
any headway. I took hold of the board, throwing my 
disabled left arm over it, when he cried to me, "For 
God's sake let go, I am drowning.' ' I said to him, 
" You fool, keep cool, this board is large enough to 
save both of us and several more if managed right," 
but he did not heed my advice and at once made an 
effort to get it aVay from me by whirling it over and 
over edgewise, he going over with it at almost every 
revolution. I kept very cool, occasionally putting my 
hands on it, thus keeping myself afloat, knowing that 
he must soon exhaust and perhaps drown himself, 
which proved to be correct, as he soon disappeared be- 
low the surface, and sank to rise no more. When I 
had full possession I struck out as best and as fast as 
I could, fearing that others might want to take pass- 
age with me, but not knowing where the strong cur- 
rent would land me. 

After being in the water for quite a long time, 
which seemed to me an age, part of the time in com- 
pany with others going down the river, some swimming, 
others floating on driftwood and all conceivable kinds 
of rafts, everything that would float being utilized; 
some were shouting for help, others praying, singing, 
17 



130 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

laughing, or swearing. I finally came in sight of 
some bushes which I took to be on the shore, but 
which as I afterwards learned was the larger one of a 
group of islands called the **Hen and Chickens.'' The 
current carried me in some distance and I brought up 
by a Cottonwood sapling. I thought perhaps I could 
touch bottom here, but found the water too deep, the 
river at that time being very high, overflowing the 
islands and surrounding country. Realizing that in 
the condition that I was then in, being almost chilled 
to death, that unless I could get out of the water I 
would probably perish before help would reach me, I 
made an effort to climb the sapling, but being then 
almost helpless, I failed in my first attempt, and 
almost lost my life, for I slipped into the water over 
my head, but with the assistance of my board my sec- 
ond effort was successful, and I found myself safely 
perched in the sapling, where I had plenty of time to 
meditate upon the situation. I thought of a great 
many things, of home, relatives, and friends, and of 
my poor comrades who must have perished, but par- 
ticularly of my intimate friend and comrade, A. 0. 
Cranmer, who I knew had a wife and children at 
home anxiously awaiting his coming, but who I 
thought must surely have perished for he could not 
swim a stroke. 

I sat on my perch trying to keep from freezing by 
fighting buffalo gnats, which were very annoying, 
until some time after daybreak when 1 heard a steam- 
boat coming up the river and knew by the shouts for 
help of those who were similarly situated as myself, 
and from the frequent stops of the engines that help 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 131 

was near at hand. In a few moments the boat was 
near me. They saw me and sent a row boat in after 
me. I was lifted by willing hands from my uncom- 
fortable seat, placed in the boat, carried to 
the steamboat and lifted upon the decks; the 
jBrst person I saw was my dear friend, A. 0. 
Cranmer, whom I had given up for lost, but he had 
landed on the same island and was picked up just a 
few moments before I was. To say it was one of the 
happiest meetings of my life would hardly express it. 
I was immediately given some hot stimulants and 
plenty of hot coffee, and was put into a nice warm 
bed. In due time the boat landed us at the wharf at 
Memphis, where those of us who were injured were 
given some clothing by the good ladies, and conducted 
to a hospital. 

When the boat landed us, I saw standing on the 
wharf Major Coulter, formerly of my regiment, who 
was then on his way to some southern port. He reached 
out his hand, but was so overcouie with grief that he 
could scarcely utter a word. He had been with us the 
evening before, treating and giving some of us a little 
spending money, little thinking at the time that so 
many would so soon find watery or fiery graves. 

I was placed in a ward with quite a number who 
were severely scalded, or otherwise badly injured, and 
such misery and intense suffering as I witnessed while 
there is beyond my power to describe. The agonizing 
cries and groans of the burned and scalded were heart- 
rending and almost unendurable, but in most cases the 
suffering was of short duration as the most of them 
were relieved by death in a few hours. I suffered 



132 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

intense pain from my injuries, especially from my dis- 
located shoulder and scalded hand, not having had any 
attention from the surgeons in charge, but I did not 
murmur or complain, as I saw all around me numbers 
of poor fellows whose injuries needed attention more 
than mine. A kind-hearted matron came to my cot 
and washed me and wrote a few lines to my parents, 
informing them of the disaster, and that I was saved. 
It was then that I thought again of my good, kind 
mother at home, and longed to be with her as I fancied 
I could see a strong resemblance between them. I was 
finally taken to the operating room, put under the 
influence of chloroform, and the dislocation reduced 
and my other injuries attended to. 

I did not remain long at the hospital. I soon found 
a number of my comrades, and with them, without 
leave or orders, boarded a boat bound for Cairo. As 
none of us had transportation or money with which to 
pay our fare the captain and clerk, after some parley- 
ing, kindly consented to carry us. In due time we 
arrived at Cairo, and after getting transportation from 
the quartermaster's department, were sent to Colum- 
bus, some to ''Camp Chase,'' the injured ones to 
'^ Treplar Hospital," where right in sight of the capitol 
of our own glorious state of Ohio we were treated more 
like brutes than soldiers, and were almost starved to 
death by some inhuman, dishonest scoundrel, in the 
employ of the government. I had too much grit to 
put up with such treatment and took " French leave " 
and left for home, where I soon received notice to 
return immediately to be mustered out of the service 
May 30, 1865, under a special telegraphic order from 



LOSS OF THE SULTAIS'A. 133 

the war department, having served just three years and 
seven months in the army. 

In all that long service, I am pleased to say, I was 
not at any time sick enough to go to a hospital and was 
only once wounded, and that only slightly, at the battle 
of Stone river. 

About twenty members of my regiment were aboard of 
the '' Sultana '' at the time of the disaster, ten of whom 
were lost. I quote from the records of the War Depart- 
ment, a copy of which I have in my possession, the 
following: '^ The reports and testimony show that there 
were 1,866 troops on the 'Sultana,' including thirty- 
three paroled officers ; one officer who had resigned, and 
the captain in charge of the guard; of these 765, 
including sixteen officers, were saved, and 1,101, 
including nineteen officers, were lost. There were 
seventy cabin passengers and eighty-five crew on board, 
of whom some ten to eighteen were saved, giving a loss 
of 137, making a total loss of 1,238." I had always 
estimated the loss greater, but presume the records are 
correct and am only too glad that the loss was not 
greater. It was without doubt the greatest marine 
disaster on record, in either ancient or modern times, 
and I am surprised that so little is remembered about 
it at this time, and especially by persons who were at 
that time great readers and can to this day tell all about 
some battle or skirmish or other disaster where the loss 
of life was trifling as compared to this. 

Present occupation, furniture dealer and undertaker. 
Postoffice address, Marion, Ohio. 



134 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

NATHANIEL FOGLESONG. 

T WAS born at Mansfield, Richland county, Ohio, in 
the year 1843, and moved from there to Wright, 
Hillsdale county, Mich., when ten years of age, liv- 
ing there until the fall of 1862. I enlisted to defend 
my country and to stand by the old ^lag in Company 
A of the 18th Michigan Infantry. From Wright we 
went to Gamp Woodbury, Hillsdale, Mich. 

I served with my regiment in all its campaigns un- 
til captured at the battle of Athens, Ala., on the 24th 
of September, 1864, by Forrest* s cavalry. They robbed 
us of our blankets, watches, and of all our valuables, 
and then we marched over rough roads, through rivers, 
and by rail to Cahaba, Ala., where we remained uutil 
the 12th of April, 18G5, when we were taken to **Camp 
Fisk," which is four miles from Vicksburg, Miss., 
there to be recruited up so that we could stand a 
journey north. They commenced giving us one quar- 
ter rations and increased it as we starved creatures 
could stand it. We remained here until we received 
orders to board the train at five o'clock p. m., on the 
24th of April, 1865, for Vicksburg. 

While at Vicksburg the steamer, **Sultana" came 
steaming in with passengers and crew numbering 110. 
The steamer remained here about thirty hours, and 
during that time was boarded by 1,996 federal soldiers 
and 35 officers — just released from the prisons at Ca- 
haba, Ala., Anderson ville and Macon, Ga., and belong- 
ing to the States of Michigan, Indiana, Ohio, West 
Virginia, Kentucky and Tennessee. We were crowded 
on the boat like a flock of sheep until the whole num- 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 135 

berof passengers was 2,141, besides horses, mules and a 
large number of hogsheads of sugar ; over six times her 
capacity. The overloaded boat steamed out of Vicks- 
burg at one o'clock A. m., on the 25th of April and 
arrived at Helena, Ark., at seven o'clock a. m., and 
left there at eight o'clock. The boat ran smoothly 
and the soldiers were enjoying the thought of being 
homeward bound. Yes, with joy that cannot be ex- 
pressed, although many of them were suffering from 
wounds received in battle, and all were sadly ema- 
ciated from starvation in the prison pens where we had 
been confined. But now we were en route for home, 
the cruel war was over and the long struggle closed. 
Battles, sieges, marches and prison pens were things 
of the past. 

We arrived at Memphis at seven o'clock in the even- 
ing of the 26th. A guard was stationed at the edge of 
the boat with orders not to let any of the prisoners get 
off. I was not very well so I did not disturb the 
guard, but a number of the boys went off the boat and 
enjoyed themselves. After unloading the cargo of 
sugar she took on a supply of coal, and then started 
from Memphis about one o'clock in the morning of 
the 27th. So far the presence of danger was not man- 
ifested nor was it in the least anticipated except that 
the boat was heavily loaded, but in the darkness of 
that terrible morning, between two and three o'clock, 
just opposite Tagleman's Landing, eight miles above 
Memphis, suddenly, and without warning, the steamer 
exploded one of her boilers with terrific force, and in 
a few moments the boat burned to the water's edge. 



136 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

The steamer was running at the rate of nine or ten 
miles an hour. 

Mr. Roberry, the chief mate, who had charge of the 
boat, and who was among the survivors, was in the 
pilot-house with Mr. Claton, the pilot, at the time of 
the explosion. At that time I was sound asleep and 
the first thing I knew or heard was a terrible crash 
and everything coming down upon us. I was lying on 
the lower deck near the stern of the boat. I laid still 
a few minutes after the explosion and my comrades 
said, **Thaniel, why don't you get up; the boat is all 
on fire?" My reply was that I could not swim, but 
they said, ''get ready and go with us." I told them 
to save their own lives as I might be the cause of losing 
them. I went with them to the edge of the boat and 
there we saw that the water was full of men, horses, 
and mules. Several of the boys were determined to 
jump off into the river, but I persuaded them to wait 
till the water was clearer and they did so, thus saving 
their lives. I still remained on the boat and heard 
the cries of comrades for help. Some of them calling 
on God for help, while others took his name in vain. 
One poor fellow, Pat Larky, who belonged to Company 
E of my regiment, had secured a board, and it seemed 
that every time he would try it it would throw him 
off into the river. Pat shouted, ''Come help poor 
Pat, he is a drowning." The poor fellow went down. 
By this time the flames were cracking and snapping 
over my head, threatening ray life. I was thinking 
whether to burn or drown, when a woman with a little 
babe about two months old came to me crying for 
help. I told her it was every one for himself. 1 saw 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 137 

that she had on a life pereserver but it was buckled 
down too low. I stepped up to her and was going to 
unbuckle it, when she said, '^ Soldier, don't take that 
oil from me.'' I said, ''it must be up under your 
arms." I placed ifc there, and took her by the hand 
and she jumped into the water. She thanked me and 
said, " may the Lord bless you." She lost her husband, 
baby, father, and mother there. 

When I saw my condition I went down upon my 
knees and asked God to be merciful to me, a sinner, 
and offered up the following prayer: "0 Lord, if it is 
thy will for me to be drowned in the Mississippi all is 
well, or, it not, may I return home to see my father, 
brothers, and sisters." I then climbed up on the 
banisters close to the rudder; being weak and feeble I 
almost lost my hold, I grasped tighter and drew my- 
self up and getting a new hold, reached out my arm 
so that I could just place my fingers and foot on the 
rudder, then bent my head and body, shoved my arm 
around the rudder, and as I let go dropped down on 
to the lower deck. While hanging to the rudder a 
man cried, *' Get off from me." I replied, '*In a min- 
ute." There were nine of us that had hold of that 
rudder and I being the top one kept quiet. Soon the 
coals from above began to fall on my head and shoul- 
ders and I began to think that I must get out of there. 
A part of the deck burned off and fell into the water, 
and I tried to get those that were under me to swim 
and get on to it, but all they said was: ''My God, if 
we let go of this we shall drown." I answered, " Let 
us die like men, helping ourselves, for God helps those 
who help themselves in this case and I believe in all 



138 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

others." The coals came thicker and faster so that I 
had to brush them off my head and shoulders with one 
hand and hang on to the rudder with the other. 

It will be seen that I had now to do something, con- 
sequently, I made up my mind, by the assistance of 
God and his mighty power, that I would jump into 
the water, and cried *' Here goes for ninety days.'* 
I sank three times, and as I came up the third time I 
grabbed a comrade by the heel. While catching my 
breath he kicked me loose and down I went again. 
As I came up I grabbed the same comrade by the 
ankle with one hand and with the other grabbed a 
wire rope to which I hung, being nearly exhausted. 
Looking around I found a piece of scantling about 
3x4, and I thought it would help me in getting to a 
piece of deck which had lloated away from the boat, so 
I went kicking and paddling like a dog till I reached 
the piece of deck. As I climbed upon it I heard com- 
rade Borns of my regiment say, *' My God, is that 
you?'* I replied, *'Yes, all that is left of me.'* He then 
said, ''I have two boards and you shall have one.** 

I then started for the center of the deck. There 
was a hole burned in it which I did not observe and 
down I went, but throwing out my arms I recovered 
myself before falling far. Afterwards I was more care- 
ful, moving around closer to the edge of the piece of 
deck, when, behold, there laid one of the deck hands 
and two women scalded to death. I found a door and 
a piece of siding. I took the piece of siding and 
shoved the door down to the comrades that were hang- 
ing on to the rudder, and finally they all got upon the 
piece of deck. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 139 

By this time the citizens had their raft made and 
came and took us to the shore where there was a log 
stable, and near it was a log heap where we warmed 
ourselves and dried our clothes. As Sergeant Borns 
was destitute of clothing, and the wind being very 
chilly, I took my pants and blouse and gave them to 
him thus leaving me with my shirt and drawers. 
Borns said to me, *' Foglesong, let us go and pray to 
God, thanking Him for saving our lives and permitting 
us to stand upon the earth once more?" I agreed, and 
he made the best and most fervent prayer that I had 
ever heard. 

Soon after this a boat came along, took us on board 
and carried us back to Memphis. I crawled into a 
bunk and soon fell asleep. The first thing I knew two 
Sisters of Charit;y came along and said, " Here is a 
soldier.'' They awoke me and I asked: ** What do you 
want?" They said: *'We want to put dry and clean 
clothes on you." I was so weak that I could not stand 
alone, but they dressed and led me to the top of the 
stairs where a lieutenant of an Indiana regiment took 
me, carried me down and placed me in a bus with 
those two ladies. They took me to the Overton hos- 
pital, and as I went into a ward one of my comrades 
of my regiment. Sergeant Nelson Voglesong, grabbed 
me, saying, " I never expected to see you again after I 
left you on the boat.'' He is dead now. They took 
me to the next ward which was quite well filled with 
the boys that were on the boat, some of them nearly 
dead and dying with the injuries received from the 
exposure. I remained in the hospital ten days, then 
went by boat to Cairo, HI., and from there by rail to 



140 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

" Camp Chase," Ohio, where I was discharged from 
the service on the 21st of Juno, 1865, and then went 
home to Wright, Hillsdale county, xVIich., where I now 
reside. 



MARTIN FRAZEE. 

T WAS born at West Farms, New York, January 1, 
* 1841, and enlisted in the service of the United 
States at Milton, Indiana, April 18, 1861, in Co. C, 
2d Regiment Indiana Cavalry, and was captured near 
Scottsville, Alabama, April 2, 1865, and confined in 
the stockade at Meridian, Mississippi, for about one 
week. I hardly think it necessary for me to give my 
** Sultana" experience, as I have no doubt that there 
will be plenty of experiences of far greater interest 
than mine. I will just state, however, that I was 
severely scalded on my body and feet and did not walk 
for five months after the explosion. 

My present occupation is that of carpenter, and my 
postoffice address is 1209 New Main street, Louisville, 
Kentucky. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 141 



W. S. FRIESNER. 



T WAS born at Logan, Ohio, August 19, 1838, and 
* enlisted in the service of the United States October 
9, 1861, in Co. K, 58th Regiment Ohio Volunteer 
Infantry. I was never captured. Was the officer in 
command of the guard in charge of the paroled pris- 
oners. When the explosion occurred I was the last 
one to leave the boat. There were a few men still on 
the forecastle, forward of the burning debris, whom I 
saw after I left the boat, some of whom, I was informed, 
were taken off by rescuing parties. I floated off on 
a stateroom door. I think I was in the water for 
nearly two hours, and was picked up by the steamer 
"Bostonia.'' 
Postoffice address, Logan, Ohio. 




HENRY CAMBILL. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 143 

TTENRY GAMBILL was born in Blaine, Lawrence 
county, Ky., December 17, 1844, and enlisted in 
the service of the United States, at Louisville, Ky., 
April 10, 1863, in Company B, 14th Regiment Ken- 
tucky Infantry. Was captured near Adairsville, Gra., 
August 13, 1864, and confined in the MilleJgeville 
and Andersonville, Ga., prisons. 

He says: At the time of the explosion I was 
asleep at the head of the stairway, in front of the 
cabin, with Elisha Ourusitte of Company G, 14th 
Regiment Kentucky Infantry; he was killed and I re- 
ceived a severe wound in my left leg, I helped to cut 
down and throw overboard a stage plank and got upon 
it, with twenty-five other comrades. One of them 
caught me by the shoulders. I finally succeeded in 
getting him to release his hold in time to save my own 
life, but he was drowned. I then beseeched my com- 
rades to get off the stage plank and rest themselves on 
its edges. By so doing it would not turn over, hold 
us all up and we would be safe, but my pleadings 
availed nothing. Finally they all drowned but myself 
and four others. We succeeded in steering it to the 
wall of an old stable, that was almost under water 
caused by the high tide of the Mississippi river. When 
we reached that most coveted spot I was so weak and 
exhausted that my comrades had to help me to a place 
of safety. We remained there until about sunrise, 
when we were rescued from our perilous condition and 
taken back to Memphis with joy and delight. 

My present occupation is that of a merchant. Post- 
office address, Blaine, Ky. 



144 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 



DANIEL CARBER. 




A 



'''^¥^f^ph^^ 




T WAS born in Washington 
^ county, Pa, April 8, 1828, 
and enlisted in the service of 
the United States at Belleville, 
Ohio, August 16, 1862, in Com- 
pany E, 102d Regiment Ohio 
Volunteer Infantry, as a private. 
The regiment was assigned to 
the 20th Army Corps. I en- 
gaged in the campaign in Ken- 
tucky and Tennessee in pursuit 
of the rebel Gen. Bragg in 1862. In all the marches and 
engagements of the regiment I took part, from Louis- 
ville, Ky., until I was taken prisoner at Athens, Ala., 
September 23, 1864. The union forces were attempt- 
ing to drive Gen. Hood back. I was at the time 
afflicted with catarrh in my left hand and was unable 
for duty. I, with about forty others, was quartered in 
a large brick mansion which for the time served as a 
hospital. 

The rebel cavalry, under command of Gen. N. B. 
Forrest, captured the town of Athens, and surround- 
ing the hospital made prisoners of all within except a 
comrade who escaped by climbing up the chimney. 
They were then taken by the way of Cherokee to 
Meridian, Miss., and while passing through here a 
citizen asked, "Where did all those 'Yanks' come 
from?'' The colonel in charge replied, ''They are 
chiefly from Ohio and Indiana, and are good boys." 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 145 

"They may be good boys, but they have stolen all our 
negroes/' was the reply. 

We continued our journey through Selma, Ala., to 
Cahaba in the same State. When we arrived here we 
were required to register, and received instructions as 
to the position of the dead line, which it was certain 
death to cross. I once stepped over this line, but 
fortunately was not seen by the guard. An escape was 
planned and the inside guard was overpowered and dis- 
armed, while the guard outside ran away, but owing 
to the lack of decisive action on the part of the pris- 
oners the attempt failed, and we were driven back 
into the prison. A cannon was planted in the door 
of the main building and we were called upon to sur- 
render. Our punishment was a fast of forty-eight 
hours. In the meantime a guard had said he had 
bayonetted a prisoner, and we were compelled to un- 
dress and hold our clothes above our heads, and march 
between the guards, but fortunately he was not dis- 
covered. 

On or about the 1st of March, 1865, the Alabama 
river got very high, owing to the incessant rain for the 
past few days, and consequently oversowed the prison 
to the depth of two feet, at the highest place, making 
it very disagreeable, for we had no place to stand up or 
lie down but in the water. 

About the 16th or 17th of March I was taken out 

with the last squad for parole, and we were taken via 

Selma, Demopolis and Jackson, Miss. While over 

night at Demopolis, Sergeant D. P. Canada, of my 

company, died. We stopped a day at Jackson, where 

a few of the boys drew some clothes. From there we 
19 



140 LOSS OK TIIK SUITANA. 

were taken to Big Black, in the rear of Vicksburg, 
where wo arrived on the ^Ist day of March. 

•Our men received us under the glorious stars and 
stripes on the 32d, and wo went into parole camp 
three or four miles in the rear of Vicksburg. Here 
we remained until the 25th or '^MJth of April, when I, 
with about 2,100 other paroled prisoners, was taken on 
board the ill fated steamer *' 8ultaua." Wo started up 
the broad Mississippi with fond hopes of soon seeing 
the dear ones at home, but how few of us had the 
pleasure of realizing these hopes. 

We arrived at Mempliis a short time before dark 
and took on coal and other matters. We left Memphis 
shortly after midnight on the 27th and when seven 
miles above there the steamer's boiler exploded. I was 
at that time lying by the side of the pilot house with 
Corporal Jacob Irons of my company, and was asleep 
when it occurred. My first recollection was that I was 
on my feet and enveloped in a cloud of hot steam, and 
was considerably scalded in the face. After the steam 
had risen I said to Corporal Irons what is the matter? 
and he said the boat had blown up. He seemed to bo 
very much excited, and told me they thought they 
could make the shore. These were the last words he 
spoke to me, but as the boys kept jumping off from 
the boat into the river he kept calling for them not to 
for they would all be saved. 

I then began to look around to devise some means 
of escape. I stepped back to where some of my com- 
pany's boys were untying a yawl; I thought that I 
would help them get it down, and then I thought if I 
did they would all jump for it and perhaps be lost, 



LO'6'6 OK nil'. ,vf;//iANA. 147 

Hfjutt*;/- and board from off th<j piJol hoij«<; arj'J tjod 
thorn togothor with a pair of draworn. I>y that tirno 
tho flamoH had oorno throu^^h. J thon got ovrjr th<5 
railing hohirjd tijo v/\n'j-A Iioijh,^: arid oJinjh(;d down to 
tho Jow'jr d<;ok. i>y thin tirno ail waw <:(mfuH\f}ti and 
rnon woro jumping oft into tho rivor to got away from 
tij<; fIy,mor;. I Jookod around for a cJ<jar pJaoo to ju/np, 
for 1 know that if J jumpod in w\i(ir(i inan wara Ktrug- 
gling thoy would Hoizo my hoard and J would ho Jo«t, 
for J oouJd Hwim hut vc.ry JittJo. 

J waitod a nhort timo and whon thoro wan an ()p<in\n'^ 
largo on ugh i tijrow my hoard in, jumpod on and 
wont down und^jr qui to a way, hut oamo up all right 
and floatod away from tho hoat. Aftor J had gone 
fourorfivo rodn a hundlo of olothing oamo floating 
along arjd 1 took it in with my right hand and hold on 
to tho hoard with my loft. I thon floatod with the 
ourront. Think I went on tho south aide of the islarid. 
J Haw a hoat going up on tho other aide and could see 
it hy the Hide of the wreck an I floated down the river. 
1 alno remomher Hooi ng tho lig^tn of Mr^mphin an I 
went paHt. 

J was picked up four miles below Memphis hy two 
men in a yawl and rowed to the gunboat '' J'ooa- 
liontaH" where 1 was taken in, eleven miles from the 
scene of the disaster. I wish to state here that there 
were thirteen of my company on board tho 'SSultana/* 
and but two besides myself were saved. Their names 
were William Lookhart and William Yeisley. About 
the last thing 1 remembered was that 1 was vdry nearly 
chilled to death and could not survive much longer. 



148 l^OSS OF THE SULTANA. 

They gave me some stimulants, and 1 did not remember 
any more until the next morning when I found myself 
undressed and between two mattresses. Wo were given 
red drawers and shirts by the Christian Sanitary Com- 
mission. I was then taken to the ''Gayoso House," 
where 1 think I stopped two days. After drawing 
clothing we were put on the steamer ** Belle of St. 
Louis," our destination being Cairo, 111. While going 
there in the night I remember several incidents that 
were amusing. Some of the more timid were spring- 
ing up at every little noise, thinking there was going 
to be another explosion. At one time we supposed 
that they were having a race with another boat, and 
one comrade said if he had a gun he would shoot the 
captain. I wish to mention another little incident 
right here. There chanced to be a citizen on the boat, 
and discovering that I was a Mason, he gave me a dol- 
lar and told me to get something I needed with it. 1 
thanked him very cordially, for it was the first money 
I had in my possession for a long time. I hope if he 
is living now and sees this he will remember this inci- 
dent and will know that I have not forgotten him. 

I think we arrived at Cairo in the evening of the 
second day after leaving Memphis. We left here after 
twelve o'clock that night for Mattoon, 111., where we 
arrived the next day, about two o'clock, and here the 
good citizens gave us a lunch. Our next destination 
was Terre Haute, Ind., which we reached at ten that 
night. We remained here urrtil the next morning. 
Our next move was to Indianapolis. We stopped 
there part of a day. From there we went to *'Camp 
Chase," Ohio, where we arrived on the 4th or 5th of 



L088 OF TifE SULTANA. 149 

May, 18G5. iiere I was diHcharged by apeoial telegram 
from the War Department on the 21st. 

When I came home I worked at my old trade, on the 
shoe bench, for about ten years; since that time J have 
been farming. Have raised a family of four girls and 
three boys, and all are married but one boy. 

My postoffice address is Butler, Ohio. 



STEPHEN M. CASTON. 

T WAS born January 11, 1850, at Centreville, Wayne 
^ county, Ind., and am, perhaps, the youngest ex- 
prisoner of war, if not the youngest soldier that was in 
the service. 1 enlisted in the service of the United 
States at Indianapolis, Ind., October 19, 1803, in 
Company K, 0th Indiana Volunteer Cavalry (12l8t 
Regiment). Was captured by Gen. Forrest's troops at 
Sulphur Branch Trestle, September 25, 1864, while on 
our way to relieve the troops stationed at Athens^ Ala., 
and was confined as a prisoner of war until about the 
10th of April, 1865, at Cahaba, Ala., when we were 
formally exchanged ; (were sent from Cahaba to the 
mouth of Tombigbee river, up that river to Gaines- 
ville, thence to West Point, Meridian, and Jackson, 
Miss., to Black River, where the commisHioners had 
established a camp of exchange). Comrades, it did 
my very soul good to see the old flag floating in the 
breezes once more, proclaiming to the world that it 
still floats and is able to shelter those who desire its 
protection. Many shed tears, a few shouted, but the 
majority were too overcome to give vent to their feel- 



150 LOSS OF THE SULTAKA. 

ings and said : ''Thank God, we are surely exchanged 
and will not be returned to that hell hole of misery 
again.'' 

After crossing the river we were taken to parole 
camp, about four miles from Vicksburg, and after 
some little rest in camp we were ordered (that is I was 
along with others, for at parole camp nearly every 
regiment in the service was represented), on board the 
"Sultana," to the number (I always understood) of 
2,300. Sixteen of that number belonged to Com- 
pany K, 9th Indiana Cavalry. We arrived at 
Memphis safely and discharged some two hundred 
hogsheads of sugar and also some horses. I found a 
hogshead of sugar broken (as soldiers always do find) 
and my comrade, Wm. Block, and I filled everything 
we could find with sugar, intending to eat the sugar 
and hard tack while going up the river to our destina- 
tion. We stored our sugar in front of the pilot house 
at our heads, for we had made this place our bunk and 
turned in for the night. Our evening dreams were 
sweet, for we had eaten about two pounds of sugar 
each, and then were we not going home to see our 
loved ones who had mourned for us as dead? We 
dreamed the soldier's dreams of home and loved ones, 
of camp life, of the battle and the prison, the scanty 
fare and the cruel guards, when, suddenly, our dreams 
were broken. I felt myself raised to a height and then 
a crash came; the smoke stack had fallen directly on 
the pilot house crushing it down almost on us. I 
felt for Block and called his name but no answer came. 
The cries of the wounded were heard all around me. 
I was a prisoner again, for a network of rubbish sur- 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 151 

rounded me. The stack above the remnaut of the 
wheel house behind the boat was on fire, and. directly 
below some poor fellows were wedged in at my right 
hand and begged for help. I was helpless and could 
render no assistance. They soon smothered from the 
heat and smoke. After trying again and again I finally 
extricated myself and, going to the hatchway or steps, 
I found my way obstructed and debris scattered every- 
where. 

I finally concluded to jump to the lower deck, but 
found I could swing down on to the breeching of the 
stack. I did so, and Oh! God, what a sight. I was on 
the bow of the boat and could not see aft, but what 
misery I did see was enough for me. Men were crying, 
praying, swearing, and begging. Wounded in every 
shape, some with broken legs and arms, others scalded, 
burnt and dying, their cries made the already dark 
night hideous, lighted up by the now fiercely burning 
boat. 

My senses remained and I thought it would be best 
to try some mode of escape. (I was wounded and badly 
scraped from my exertion to get from under the smoke- 
stack.) On looking around I found an empty flour 
barrel, and divesting myself of clothing I jumped into 
the chilling waters. Taking the precaution to see that 
no person was near I was fortunate to get clear of the 
boat without encountering anyone, although two or 
three tried to get to me, but drowned before reaching 
me. I saw at least twenty drown at once. As fast as 
one would feel he was drowning he would clutch at 
the nearest, and I believe many a bold swimmer was 
drowned that night who could have saved himself 



]62 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

if alone. I was finally rescued by a life-boat from the 
steamer *' Bostonia" and taken to the cabin of that 
steamer in a cramped and exhausted condition, and was 
then taken in an ambulance to Overton hospital. 
After remaining there three days was sent to the 
Soldier's Retreat, then with some three hundred others 
forwarded to ''Camp Chase," Ohio. I stopped at 
Terre Haute, my home, and followed in the evening to 
Indianapolis, thence to ''Camp Chase," from which 
place I ran away and reported back to Indianapolis to 
Adjt. Gen. Noble, and was given transportation home 
and a pass for twenty days. Was discharged at Indian- 
apolis June 28, 1865. 

My occupation is that of engineer of Eagle Mills. 



W. N. GOODRICH. 

I WAS born in Whiteford township, Monroe county, 
Mich., November 21, 1842, and at the present am 
living in the city of Menominee, Mich. Enlisted in 
the service of the United States at Ridgeway, Lenawee 
county, Mich., on the 31st of July, 1862, in Company 
E of the 18th Michigan Infantry. After a short stay 
in camp at Hillsdale we proceeded to what we supposed 
was the front, but which was Kentucky. After tramp- 
ing through most of this State and spending one 
winter at Lexington, we finally, in April or May of 
1863, boarded the cars for the front, but we were again 
mistaken and only got as far as Nashville, Tenn., 
where we halted at a large building called " Zollicoffer 
Building." We remained there two or three days, 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 153 

spending most of our time in killing graybacks as 
they were thicker than fleas on a dog. From there we 
went into camp, which was very much better, and I 
thought if this was the front it was about as nice as 
could be. Soon, however, our fun began. Being on 
duty almost every other day it was fun for a time, but 
soon became a drudge. We remained there a long 
year, and then the glad news came for us to pack up 
and go to the front. This was some time in May or 
June. We started for the seat of war, or what we sup- 
posed to be it, arriving at Decatur, Ala., in the 
night and pitched our tents just outside of the city, on 
the hills that were covered with the filth and rubbish 
of the city. 

On the 23d of September it was reported that a 
band of " Johnnies '* were tearing up the track near 
Athens, Ala., and a detail of about 400 men was made 
from our brigade and boarded a train of flat cars some 
time in the night. Crossing the river and waiting 
until daylight, we then proceeded as far as we could 
on the cars, then going on foot for a short distance we 
were suddenly fired upon by the enemy. The firing 
was returned by us and the enemy fled. Our orders 
were to go to Athens, so we went on. Getting in sight 
of Athens, what did we see? ''Johnnies" all around 
us. Hundreds of them in our front and rear. We 
fought with them the best we could and tried to get 
to the fort, as our dear old stars and stripes were still 
flying. But alas ! as we had got almost there the 
gates swung open and out marched our boys in blue. 
What could we do but surrender ? It was with long 
faces that a flag of truce was sent to the commander 



154 LOSS OF THE SULTAN^A. 

that we had surrendered. Soon we were surrounded 
by the "Johnnies,'' asking for something to eat. It 
seemed to me as though they were about starved, and 
we soon found that our captor was Gen. Forrest. When 
I heard this I thought my time had come, as the mas- 
sacre at Fort Pillow was fresh in my memory. 

We did not remain long at Athens but were hurried 
off to a Southern prison, Cahaba, Ala., where we were 
fed on corn meal for almost six months when the glad 
news came that we were to leave; some thought for 
Andersonville, others thought for home. It proved to 
be the latter. After riding in dirty box cars and then 
marching, we arrived at Big Black river on the 21st 
of March, 1865, and remained in camp, which was 
four miles from Vicksburg, for three or four weeks. 
Then the glad news came that we were to go North 
and be exchanged. 

We marched to Vicksburg and went on board the 
steamer ''Sultana." We were a jolly crowd, but our 
joy was of short duration. Everything went along 
smoothly until we were about eight miles above Mem- 
phis, when the explosion took place by which so many 
lives were lost. As for myself I had no thoughts of 
dying just then, so I looked around among the wreck 
and found a box, carried it to the side of the boat and 
waited until the coast was clear ; then threw it over- 
board and jumped in after it. It seemed to me as 
though I was going down to the bottom, but such was 
not the case. Soon coming to the surface of the water 
I seized the box and started down the river for shore, 
or any place where I could get out of the water. After 
floating and swimming about four miles I landed safely 



tiOSS of THE SUL1?ANA. 155 

on a small willow tree. Soon after getting nicely fixed 
on the branches, making myself as comfortable as pos- 
sible under the circumstances, a man by the name of 
Williams, of the 1st Kentucky Cavalry, came floating 
along and caught hold of a log that was fast to the 
tree. After watching him a few minutes I descended 
from my perch and helped him upon the log, held him 
there for two hours, and was rewarded by seeing him 
come to life again, as he was as near dead as any one I 
have seen who was not dead. 

Early in the morning of the 27th of April boats 
were seen coming up the river searching for the victims 
of the disaster. Some of the poor fellows were hang- 
ing to the trees, some were on logs, and some were 
found in almost every conceivable place. At about 
eight o'clock I was picked up, taken on board a steamer 
and about twelve o'clock landed at Memphis. Remain- 
ing there four days, I again started for the north, this 
time with fear, thinking that we might meet with the 
same catastrophe, but we landed safely at Cairo, 111., 
there boarded the train for "Camp Chase," Ohio. Ar- 
riving there I remained two weeks and then was sent to 
my native State, where I was discharged from the 
service. 

My occupation, mail carrier. 



N. W. GREGORY. 

T WAS born in Erie county, Ohio, June 8, 1845, and 
^ enlisted in the service of the United States at Nor- 
walk, Ohio, December 28, 1861, in Company C, 55th 



156 LOSS OF tHE SULTAN-A. 

Regiment Ohio Volunteers, and was captured at South 
Mountain, Ga., October 28, 1864, and confined in the 
Anderson ville, Ga., prison. 

At the time of the accident was asleep on the cabin 
deck. I was, of course, aroused from my slumber and 
found myself mixed up with the debris of the wreck. 
Had some difficulty in releasing myself from between 
the two decks, but after some little time succeeded. 
I found there were a great many looking for safer 
quarters. The jam of men was so great that after I 
slid down it seemed impossible for me to get a foot- 
hold, and I came near being carried overboard by the 
surging crowd, but after a long struggle got on my 
feet again. By this time the fire was beginning to 
drive the crowd back and I saw the time was short for 
anyone to stay on the boat. Seeing a large coil of rope 
at one end fast to the boat I threw it overboard, got 
ready for a swim, but before jumping made a search 
for pieces of boards or something that would give me 
some assistance after I left the wreck, which I did not 
intend to do until the fire forced me off. I managed 
to get a couple of panels of a door, and by this time 
the heat was more than I could bear so I let myself 
down into the water with the rope which I had pre- 
pared before. The water was alive with men for some 
distance from the wreck, but I was a good swimmer 
and made good use of it; that is, as good as I could 
after being six months at Anderson ville prison and not 
having strength for a very long struggle in the water. 

After being in the water a short time I got on to an 
old tree — there were three men on it already. After 
a couple of hours I was so chilled and stiff that if I 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 157 

had been forced into the water I could not have helped 
myself. One of the men that was on the tree chilled 
and drowned before he was rescued. I was taken from 
the water by the steamboat ''Silver Spray'' about eight 
o'clock in the morning, not far from where the explo- 
sion took place. Was taken to Memphis and placed in 
the hospital. Have many thanks for the people of 
Memphis for the good care and treatment of the sur- 
vivors. 

On the way north, after starting for home, there 
were sixty of us in the crowd that left Memphis. Was 
pleased when we arrived safe at Cairo, 111., for I had a 
dread of steamboat travel. There was an incident on 
the way after leaving Cairo that is well worth mention- 
ing. I am sorry that I cannot remember the place or 
the name of the family that is connected with the inci- 
dent. The cars stopped at a small town just at three 
o'clock in the morning after riding all night from 
Cairo. At this place we were obliged to stay until ten, 
as we had to change roads. After a short stay at the 
depot I took a stroll upon one of the streets, and when 
near a large, fine looking place I was taking a view of 
it, when a man came out and invited me in. I readily 
accepted. Taking me into the sitting-room I found 
nine of the boys all waiting for breakfast. After the 
meal was over the man of the house provided himself 
with ten one-dollar bills and gave one to each of us. 
I have given him many a thought, but, like all other 
soldiers, I was careless at the time. I hope this will 
remind some of them who were there of the incident, 
if they are living, and in this way I may find out the 
name of this family. 



158 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

My present occupation is mining. Postoffice address, 
Lead City, South Dakota. 



SAMUEL C. HAINES. 

T WAS born in Burlington county, N. J., March 5, 
^ 1843, and enlisted in the service of the United 
States, at LaFayette, Ind., December 10, 1861, in 
Company G 40th Regiment Indiana Volunteer 
Infantry, and was captured at the battle of Franklin, 
Tenn., November 30, 1864, and confined in the Ander- 
sonville, Ga., prison. 

About the Ist of April, 1865, I, with aboac 600 
other starved prisoners, waa taken from the prison to 
Vicksburg and paroled. We waited there several days 
and regained much of our lost strength. While there 
we heard of President Lincoln's assassination, which 
caused greater grief than any defeat we had received 
while on the battlefield. The remaining time his 
assassination was the subject of heated conversation, and 
the southern sympathizers kept well out of our way. 
At last word came for us to get ready to go home. 
We boarded the illfated '* Sultana" in the afternoon. 
Myself and two comrades, John Thompson and Chas. 
May, of Company G, 40th Regiment Indiana Infantry 
(both were lost), went directly to the upper deck, back 
of the pilot house, and laid down to sleep. We awoke 
when they stopped at Memphis, but after leaving there 
we went to sleep again and knew nothing until 
awakened by the explosion. About the first thing I 
thought of was that some raiding rebel battery had 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 159 

thrown a shell into the boat. I then heard screams of 
men below. Some one cried '^ Keep quiet ! Keep 
quiet I We will run ashore." That made me feel 
good. In a few moments fire broke out, and as I 
could not swim I stayed on board until driven olf by 
the heat. I helped tear off a flight of stairs from the 
passenger deck to the hurricane deck, intending to 
jump in the water with it, but quickly changed ray 
mind. I talked a moment with Nathan D. Everman, 
an excellent swimmer. He promised me help, but 
when he saw me afterward he bid me *'good bye," say- 
ing that I was all right. 

After leaving the stairs and Everman I ran into the 
cabin, clutched a bunk with both hands and jumped 
into the river with it. It went down twice with me. 
I let loose of it after the second sinking, having swal- 
lowed some water and almost strangled. I could not 
keep my head out of the water, and thinking I was 
going to drown I began to dive, hoping to find some- 
thing to cling to and reach the shore. In a few 
minutes I found myself near two men clinging to a 
board. They tried to keep me off, but I was too strong 
for them and succeeded in getting a firm hold on it. 
They afterwards told me they were good swimmers 
and the board would float all three of us. We floated 
down the river about a mile, when we drifted among 
five or six men who were drowning. They broke my 
hold of the board and I again thought I was lost, but 
fortunately I bobbed up by a long steerage pole. It 
was about twenty-five feet long. An Irishman, one of 
the boat hands, was on one end of it. I was carried 
along on it very njcely going down stream I said to 



160 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

him, *'Let us steer for the shore, we can use our limbs 
and may get into a tree top/' We landed on the 
Arkansas shore, as I afterwards learned, and remained 
there till about seven o'clock A. m. A steamer came 
up from Memphis and sent a skiff out to us, and we, 
almost naked, were taken to the steamer and after- 
wards to Memphis. Some citizens gave me a pair of 
shoes and five dollars in our money. They treated me 
as kindly as any one could. 1 went to the quarter- 
master's department and drew a dry suit of clothes. I 
had lost all but shirt and pants when in the water, and 
with what the citizens gave me I was now fitted out. 

I stayed in Memphis about two weeks and met my 
friend Everman, who was very glad to see me. We 
were afraid to try the boats again and waited for the 
train to go North. We received word that they would 
not run any train for several weeks. We were too 
anxious to get home to wait any longer, so we again 
tried the water. This time we succeeded in getting to 
Cairo, 111. Here I boarded a train for Indianapolis. 
At Terre Haute we were given a grand dinner, and I 
began to think I was in God's country again. We 
then proceeded on our way to Indianapolis and received 
a furlough for thirty days. When the time was up I 
went back and was honorably discharged June 20, 1865. 

My present occupation is trader and stock buyer. 
Present postoffice address, Komney, Ind. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 161 



OGILVIE E. HAMBLIN. 

T AM a resident of Pulaski township, Jackson county, 
Mich., and am now fifty years old (March, 1892). 
I enlisted in the United States army, at Jackson, 
Mich., in 1863, as a private in Company E of the 2nd 
Regiment Michigan Cavalry, and went from Jackson 
to Grand Rapids, Mich., thence to Nashville, Tenn., 
and there we drilled for regular service until February, 
1864. Thence we went to Cleveland, Tenn., to join 
our regiment. We did not see much actual service 
until May 5, 1864, when we started with Sherman for 
Atlanta. We went as far as Kenesaw and Lost Moun- 
tain and then turned our horses over to Cook's com- 
mand and came back to Nashville to guard the Nash- 
ville & Franklin Railroad until Atlanta was taken. 
We then drew horses and drilled at Franklin until 
Forrest came back in Sherman's rear and crossed the 
Tennessee river. We were then sent to drive him back 
again. After driving him back we were ordered to 
guard the river to keep Hood from crossing, our com- 
pany being sent to Raccoon Ford where Hood was 
attempting to cross. There was a small engagement 
took place there when our cavalry was surrounded and 
all taken prisoners, I being so unfortunate as to get 
shot through the arm near the shoulder. This was on 
the 30th day of October, 1864. They took me from 
Raccoon Ford to Florence, Ala., and there, for prac- 
tice, the young rebel doctors cut off my arm ; I think it 
could have been saved. 

They kept me in the hospital at Florence until the 
1st of December, when Hood again commenced mov- 
21 



162 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

ing toward Nashville. Then I was sent to Columbus, 
Miss., to the rebel hospital, and as soon as I was able I 
was sent to Oahaba prison, Ala., where I remained un- 
til they sent me to Jackson, Miss. ; thence to Vicks- 
burg, where I boarded the steamer "Sultana," and 
then we went up to Memphis, Tenn., and while they 
were unloading some sugar at Memphis my chum, 
Frank Perkins, and I spread down our blankets, took 
off our top clothes all but our shirts and drawers, and 
were soon in the hand of slumbers, dreaming of battle 
fields and of all the scenes which we had passed through, 
when we were suddenly awakened by a terrific ex- 
plosion. I sprang to my feet only to find the whole 
boat in a tremendous tumult and uproar. The cries 
of the dying and the groans of the wounded, and the 
loud appeals for help, were heartrending. The hold of 
the boat was full of comrades. They cried for the 
door of the hold to be opened. My chum (Frank 
Perkins) and I pulled the door away, when they came 
rushing out of the hold like bees out of a hive, fol- 
lowed by dense clouds of steam and smoke. I re- 
mained on board the boat until the fire and steam 
drove me off. I then looked the situation over calmly, 
and, thinking that my underclothes would be a hin- 
drance to me while in the water, I took every stitch of 
my clothing off as coolly as though about to take a bath 
which proved to be of considerable duration. The 
water was already full of the seething mass of humanity. 
Some were swimming boldly toward the shore, others 
going down to rise no more. Some were clasping and 
dragging down to death those who could have saved 
themselves had they been left unencumbered. All in 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 163 

all it was a terrible sight to behold and one from which 
I shrink and shudder to this day, nor do I ever wish 
to witness such a sight again. 

Screwing my courage up to the sticking point I 
prepared to take the leap into the icy waters which I 
expected to be my sepulchre. I watched my chance 
for a clear spot so that no one would catch onto me 
and drown me at once. Into the water, and when I 
arose to the surface I struck out as best I could. 
Having but one arm to swim with I found I could do 
nothing against the strong current, and so let myself 
float down with the current. A.fter floating for some 
time I came across my old chum, Frank Perkins, again 
and three other fellows on a plank. They asked me 
to get on but the plank would not hold all of us up so 
I put my arm on his back to rest myself and floated 
along ; then I struck out again, when, behold, a wel- 
come object was in sight — some trees on an island. 
I floated into a tree top and caught fast with my arm 
and shouted for help. When nearly exhausted some 
woodsmen heard me and came to my rescue with a 
boat. They took me to their shanty. I never was as 
cold in all my life ; I shook until I thought I would 
shake their shanty down. The steamer blew up 
between one and two o'clock and I was rescued just 
before daylight. I could not tell the distance we 
floated down the river, nor the length of time we were 
in the water, but it seemed a long time and I do not 
want another bath like it. The United States steamer 
*' Pocahontas " came up the river and picked us up 
and took us back to Memphis. 

It was quite embarrassing for me when I got off the 



164 LOSS OF THE SULTAl^A. 

boat onto the wharf. I was still in the same condition 
as when I leaped into the water — entirely naked. 
When we reached the warehouse the United States 
Sanitary Commission gave me a pair of red drawers 
and undershirt, when I felt comparatively happy. I 
was then taken to the Soldiers' Home at Memphis, and 
there fitted out with a full suit and cared for like a 
human being. I remained there three days and was 
then taken to Columbus, Ohio. Thence to Detroit 
and from there to Jackson, the place of beginning. 
As I look back over the past, mine was an experience 
which I would not want to go through again. I am 
now comfortably situated but am almost totally blind 
and expect, ere this is published in book form, to be 
shut entirely out from the light of day, which I can 
trace back to poor vaccination and exposure while 
undergoing the above written sufferings. 



ROBERT N. HAMILTON. 

T ENLISTED in the service of the United States on 
^ the 9th day of July, 1862, at Huntsville, Scott 
county, Tenn. I was a private in Company F of the 
3rd Regiment of Tennessee Cavalry, and was captured 
at Athens, Ala., on the the 24th of September, 1864, 
and confined in Cahaba Prison, Ala., and released 
from there about the 12th of March, 1865. About 
two o'clock on the morning of April 27, 1865, the 
explosion of the '^Sultana" occurred, and every deck 
was covered with sleeping soldiers. I was sleeping 
with Corp. H. C. Jones of my company on the boiler 



LOSS OF THE SULTAN^A. 165 

deck, about midway between the boilers aud the stern 
of the boat. The noise awoke me. I thought that I 
would be crushed to death by the falling timbers; but 
I soon found that the boat was on fire. I began to 
make preparations for my escape. I first went toward 
the stern of the boat, but everywhere was confusion. 
Men and women were praying, and most of them not 
thinking of trying to save their lives. They were 
leaping off into the water on top of each other — 
hundreds drowning together. I saw that was not the 
place for me to make my escape, so I turned around 
and went back to about the center of the boat and got 
a thin board — about six inches wide and about ten 
feet long — and went out through the wheel-house, 
climbed down on the wheel, and got off into the water 
without sinking. 

Soon after I got into the water some one got hold 
of my board. I spoke to him to let go of it, as it was 
not sufficient for both of us, but I had to jerk it away 
from him. I then heard Buck Leonard exclaim, "Is 
that you, Bob ? " I told him it was. He said, *' Don't 
get excited and you will get out." I thought he was 
taking things rather cool, as he had on all of his 
clothes, even to his hat and boots. He got out alive 
and, I reckon, is living today. I still held on to my 
board and swam for some time but did not seem to be 
getting very far from the old wreck, which had, in a 
very short time, burned down to the boiler deck. I 
suppose I had been in the water something near one 
hour when I saw a steamboat going down the river. 
I started toward it, as I thought it would stop to pick 
us up, but it kept on going. I had got back nearer the 



166 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

burning wreck. Seeing several of the boys had got 
back on the bow of the boat, I swam to where one of 
the spars was lying with one end in the water and the 
other end on the bow of the wreck. I climbed it and 
got back on the bow, where I, together with about 
twenty others, was taken to land by two citizens, on 
the Arkansas side of the river. After getting back on 
the old wreck I met Thomas Pangle of my company 
and saw the bodies of three men that were burned 
beyond recognition, and helped to pull a man up on the 
boat; he was one of the engineers. His nose was 
torn off, all except a small particle of skin, and he died 
before he was taken to land. It was now about sun- 
rise. The hull sank soon after the last load was taken 
off. The two men that rescued us brought ashore the 
bodies of two dead women, mother and daughter, who 
were of a family of about eight persons, all of whom 
were drowned except a grown son who was frantic 
with grief at the sight of his dead mother and sister. 
A boat soon came to our relief. Thomas Pangle and 
I found Jarson M. Elliott of our company on the boat. 
He was scalded all over and unable to help himself, 
but was perfectly composed and bore his suffering 
with great fortitude. He had his army badge which 
he requested me to give to his parents. He died that 
night at Gayoso Hospital, Memphis, Tenn. Next day 
I met my brother John and several more of our com- 
pany. My brother Henry was lost with about twenty 
others of the company. 

About the 29th of April we were again started north 
and landed at Cairo, 111., where we took the cars for 
Mattoon, 111. On arriving at Mattoon we were met by 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 167 

the citizens of the surrounding country with wagon 
loads of provisions, the best that the country afforded. 
The vast multitude manifested their sympathy for us 
through speeches made by chosen orators. Never shall 
I forget seeing the tears shed by the stoutest hearts on 
that occasion. We then went to ''Camp Chase," 
Ohio, where we remained a short time. Eventually, 
all the paroled prisoners were ordered to their respect- 
ive States to be mustered out of the service by general 
order No 77. I was discharged from the service of the 
United States on the 10th of June, 1865, at Nashville, 
Tenn. 

Thus ended nearly three years of hard service which 
I gave my country, and of which I feel proud today. 
All I regret is that I could not do more for my coun- 
try. I try to teach my children the importance of 
honoring our country and its glorious old flag. God 
bless it, may it wave over a free country as long as time 
may last. 

My present postoffice address, Van Alstyne, Grayson 
county, Texas. 



ABSALOM N. HATCH. 

[ WAS born in Steuben county. New York, March 8, 
^ 1839. Enlisted at Saginaw, Mich., November 11, 
1861, Company F, 1st Regiment Michigan Engineers 
and Mechanics. Was captured near Huntsville, Ala., 
May 5, 1864, and confined in a prison at Cahaba, Ala., 
also at Marion, Miss. 
I was put on board the '^Sultana " too weak to care 



168 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

what became of me, but the air from the river, with 
the sweet crackers and other dainties provided by the 
ladies, seemed to put new life into me. I began to 
realize that I was on my way home after a prison life 
of ten and one-half months. 

On the night of the disaster I did not lie down until 
the boat loosed from her moorings at the coal barge 
near midnight, and then found that some comrade had 
occupied my place or rather the one that I had selected 
on the boiler deck. There was no other way than to 
find another, a task easier thought of than accom- 
plished, but which I proceeded to do. I first explored 
the boiler deck, then cabin and hurricane decks, but 
all were full. I then went below and out in front of 
the boilers, near the flagstaff on the bow, and rolled 
myself up in a blanket, between coils of rope. Had 
just gone to sleep when the explosion occurred. Sev- 
eral men ran over me and jumped into the river before 
I could get on my feet. I stayed on the boat until the 
wheel or covering on the left hand side began to topple 
into the boat, when I jumped in the river with an oak 
scantling (2x4) for company, floated within three miles 
of Memphis and was finally picked up by a boat just 
at peep of day. 

The sight while on the boat, previous to leaving it, 
brings a shudder even to this late day. 

p. s. — Yours found me just attacked with erysip- 
elas, wrote off what you find on this sheet ; the next 
morning both eyes were swollen shut, have just got 
around again. Would have written more if I had been 
well. Present occupation is that of farming. Post- 
office address, Ellington, Tuscola county, Mich. 



LOSS OF THE SULTAITA. 169 



JACOB HELMINGER. 




T WAS born in Allen county, 
^ Ohio, in 1839. Enlisted in the 
service of the United States, at 
Huston, Ohio, August 1, 1862, 
in Company B, 50th Ohio In- 
fantry. Was captured at Frank- 
lin, Tenn., November 30, 1864, 
and confined in the Cahaba 
prison. 
The loss of the "Sultana," on 
the morning of the 27th day of April, 1865, will 
remain fresh in the minds of the survivors as long as 
life lasts. I have seen men shot down in battle, treated 
like brutes while prisoners of war, but the explosion 
of the "Sultana " caused the greatest horror I ever 
witnessed. In giving my experience in the affair I 
will not attempt to give the experience of others, for 
each one had all he could do to look out for himself. 
A few of my own company and myself were sleeping 
on top of the hurricane deck. In my sleep I heard 
a noise and felt a terrible jar of the boat. In an 
instant I was wide awake, and before I could realize 
what had happened my comrades were also on their 
feet. Smoke and steam had already taken possession 
of the boat, and we were not long in perceiving the 
situation of affairs. I stepped where I could see and 
looked at my watch, and I think it was about two 
o'clock. This watch I brought out with me and have 
it yet. We now saw that the boat was on fire. Many 
of the injured ones were screaming and groaning. I 



170 l.OSS OF THK sri.TANA. 

told my comrndes to romain thoro, while 1 wont down 
on tlio next tloor to seo if thoro was iinytliing wo could 
use Jis H raft, and if so I would return to them and wo 
would at once aim to make our escape. I had groat 
ditKculty in getting below, every body and everything 
being in the way, and finally, after getting there, 1 
found nothing but what was already in the hands of 
someone or thrown overboard with perhaps a hundred 
men contesting for its possession. I then made my 
way back on the hurricane deck, but found the boys 
T had left there gone or scattered, and saw nothing 
more of them until after daylight, tinding all of them 
at Memphis but one. This was G. W. Shearer 
of my company. lie has never been heard from 
and can only be accounted for as one among the lost ; 
about seventeen hundred (1700) brave soldiers that 
found watery graves. 

I then saw that none could assist each other but 
that each would have to look out for himself, and that 
I would have to watch my chance and make my escape- 
To jump into the water just at that time would have 
been certain death, for the river looked to me like a 
solid mass of men. Some appeared to be swimming 
away, others trying to get back to the boat, while 
others were drowning, and not only themselves but 
pulling others under with them. Some wore praying, 
some swearing, while others appeared quite calm and 
only looking for a favorable opportunity to get away. 
I heard the captain of the boat giving a command, 
lie told us to come to order, that the hull was not 
hurt and we would land. Now, if the lire could be 
put out I would have thought this order very advis- 



L0S8 OF TiiK :;r;j/rANA. 171 

able, but 1 oould w/n no pOHHibllity of ntopping tho 
i]ixm(iH un\(iHH thoy wore qu(;no}jOfi by water. 

The firo had now become ho great a pernon eouJd nee 
a considerable diatance each way from the boat. The 
crowd in the water had alHO Hoattered, so J began to 
muster my courage and prepare to leap overboard. I 
had great confidence in myself as a swimmer, and 
hoped to make shore if I waw not iniorfered with by 
drowning people or getting cramped. AJJ the clothes 
I had on was my pants, shirt and socks. This had 
been my night dress, an'] 1 conclurled to swim as I 
was. J was ignorant of the distance to either shore 
and thinking, perhaps, it was not over three or four 
hundred yards either way I would take the Tennessee 
shore, I looked for a clear spot and made a final leap. 
When I came to the surface I looked around to see if 
any one was near me, and seeing there was not all I 
had to contend with was the mighty waters of the 
Mississippi. I now put in my best efforts and pulled 
for the shore ; I imagined myself making great speed 
for a while, but finally noticed I. was drifting down 
below the boat. 1 could see at once that the current 
of the river was against me, and thought J would try for 
tho opposite or Arkansas side. 'J'his effort was also a 
defeat. Somehow the current worked against me in 
this direction more than in the other. 

I headed down the stream and could see some lights, 
not knowing what and where they were, and resolved 
to steer for them. I had not gone far until I noticed 
an object of some kind in the water ahead of me. I 
kept my eyes on it, and after awhile heard some one 
talking in that direction and so called to them. They 



ITC I Ov<S OK THK Sl'lTVNA. 

answorod and told ino to ooino to tliom, so I diil my 
best and after awliilo oaught up with thoni. It provod 
to bo a largo plank capable of holding from four to six 
men, while there was only two upon it. They invited 
me on board with them and of course I accepted. My 
new companions appeared quite clieerful, under the 
circumstances, and one of them said the lights ahead 
of us was >[cmphis, and on nearing them found that 
our comrade was right. 

It did not take long for our plank to slide down the 
river, opposite the wharf. A man came to us with a 
skill and landed us on shore. It was now daylight and 
tlie wharf w;\s already crowded with people, all anxious 
to know the cause of the explosion. Of course wo 
could give no reason, or at least 1 could not, and in 
fact I did not feel like talking for I was so benumbed 
with cold that I felt very little interest in anything or 
anyone. I have never been a whiskey drinker, but on 
this occasion drank nearly a pint at a time given me 
by a ferry-boat captain. 

1 am a carpenter by trade. Postoffice address, New 
Sharon, Iowa. 



WILLIAM S. HILL. 

1 WAS born in Blount county, Teun., in the year 
IS-to, and enlisted in the service of the United 
States at Knoxville, Tenn., in the fall of 1803 in 
Company L, 3rd ixegiment Tennessee Cavalry, and 
was captured at Sulphur Trestle, Ala., in the fall of 
ISlU, and coutined at Cahaba, Ala, 



L0~3 Oy THE Hl'LTA'SA, 1 ?3 

At the time of the explosion of tl-ie steamer '^Sul- 
tana '' I waa blown into the river anr] floated about 
nine miles before I waa picked up. My present post- 
office is Ptockford, Tenn. 



WILEY J. HODCES. 

T WAS born in Sevier county, Tenn., November 4, 
^ 1835, and enlisted in the service of the United 
States at Knoxville, Tenn., on the loth day of June, 
1863, in Company F, 3rd Ptegiment Tennessee Cavalry. 
Was captured at a trestle in Alabama, September 25, 
1804, and confined in the prinon at Cahaba, Ala., until 
the 6th day of March, 18G5, when I waa taken to Vicks- 
burg for exchange and was sent up the river on the 
ill-fated steamer "Sultana." My bunk wasnear the 
boiler, and on the night of the terrible accident I lay 
with a blanket over me. I was awakened by the explo- 
sion and found mynelf covered with burning coals from 
the furnaces. I was not long in springing to my feet 
and throwing my burning blanket away and getting 
away from that locality. I remained on the boat until 
the fire became uncomfortable when I obtained a plank, 
and throwing it into the river followed after it. I soon 
found that it was not sufficient to hold me out of the 
water bo I caught hold of a floating barrel, but after 
turning it over a few times concluded I did not want 
it and let it go. I then turned back to the boat and 
obtained three planks, and putting them together held 
them with my hands and feet and found then that I 
could keep my head out of water. I floated down the 



174 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

river in this manner until daylight, when I saw two 
men upon the bank to whom I hallooed for help. 
They came to my rescue and took me to a house where 
I remained till a steamer came along and carried me 
back to Memphis. I was discharged from the service 
of the United States at Nashville, Tenn., on the 15th 
day of June, 1865. 
My occupation is that of a farmer. 



P. L. HORN. 

I WAS born in the city of Wooster, Wayne county, 
^ Ohio, October 24, 1844, and pursue the vocation of 
a confectioner and baker. I enlisted as a private in 
Company I of the 102d Regiment Ohio Volunteer In- 
fantry, at Wooster, Ohio, August 7, 1862. Was cap- 
tured at Athens, Ala., September 24, 1864. Was held 
as prisoner at Cahaba, Ala,, for seven months; was 
then released and sent to Vicksburg, Miss., where I got 
on board the steamer *' Sultana," that had sailed from 
New Orleans, and upon which the eye of an evil planet 
was resting. At Vicksburg, Miss., one of the boilers 
underwent a process of repairing. We steamed up the 
river, the vessel running smoothly and all going 
^' merry as a marriage bell." We reached Memphis 
on the evening of the 26th of April, 1865, where a 
cargo of sugar was unloaded. Departing thence at 
about midnight we pressed up the river and took on 
coal. While this was going on I fell asleep. After 
that I knew but little and seemed to live a thousand 
years in a minute. My first conception or self-identi- 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 175 

fication was that I was lost in the air, and true it was — 
I was whirled in the air. 

When the explosion took place I was lying on the 
left side of the boat on the cabin guard at the foot of 
the stairs that goes up to the hurricane deck. I was 
either blown through the stairway or thrust out side- 
wise into the river, but my first consciousness was that 
of being in the air. When I struck the water I went 
down twice, when, upon rising the second time, I 
encountered a piece of the wreck which I seized. I 
think it was a part of the cabin guard which was about 
twenty feet in length by six to eight feet in width. 
Seven other comrades clung to the wreck upon which 
we floated down the river, passing the city of Memphis. 
On the way down in this life and death struggle, two 
of the men, through sheer exhaustion, relinquished 
their hold, and sinking back into the arms of the cruel 
river, were drowned. I do not know their names; 
they were strangers to me. 

It was now just before daybreak and the darkness 
was most terrible, but nevertheless we sounded the 
loudest possible alarm, which was heard by men in a 
gunboat lying near, and we were picked up by a skiff 
with three men in it. There were six of us in the 
boat and one of them, my bunkmate, Joseph McKelvy, 
of my company, was scalded from head to foot in the 
explosion. I was the first one to get into the boat. 
McKelvy recognized me and said: "For God's sake, 
help me in." I said: '^Is that you?" '^t is," he 
replied. I asked: "Are you hurt?" He answered: 
" Yes, scalded from head to foot." I took him by the 
arm and one of the boatmen took hold of him also. 



176 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

and we helped him into the skiff. The boatman 
removed his coat and put it around McKelvy to pre- 
vent him from taking cold. We then started up the 
river toward Memphis and when crossing the river in 
the direction of the Tennessee side (we were then on 
the Arkansas side), we were fired upon by some negro 
guards (Union men) who thought that we were Con- 
federates and who were guarding the river some dis- 
tance below Fort Pickens. 

We then headed up stream and met a steamer in 
anxious search of the victims of the terrible disaster. 
One of the skiffmen with a lantern signalled the 
steamer and it came to a halt and we were taken on 
board. McKelvy was hurt the worst and received the 
most kind and tender attention. A bed was made on 
the lower deck for him, his clothing removed and his 
body sprinkled with flour, if possible to mitigate his 
sufferings. 

The dense darkness still prevailed and the steamer 
continued its journey down the deep broad current on 
the alert for victims till after daylight, when it re- 
turned to Memphis not having found any more of the 
unfortunates. Shortly after we were taken on the 
steamer a comrade (stranger to me) died, but prior to 
to his death they placed him on a barrel and for a 
time rolled him quite vigorously, thinking that he was 
gorged with water. When we arrived at Memphis the 
ladies of the Sanitary Commission were the first to 
come to us with dry clothing, giving each of us a 
flannel shirt and a pair of drawers. We changed our 
clothing and then were driven in cabs to the hospital. 
The unfortunate McKelvy was taken to a different 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 177 

hospital, in some part of the city, where he died. We 
remained in Memphis two or three days and those who 
were able and well enough were transported to Cairo, 
111., and thence to Columbus, Ohio, where I was dis- 
charged from the service May 20, 1865. 

At the time of the explosion McKelvy and I were 
lying together asleep, and it is a matter of wonder to 
me how I escaped when he was so seriously injured. 
When the explosion took place my first impression was 
that I was experiencing another railroad disaster, as I 
had just passed through an ordeal of that kind on the 
way to Athens, but when I collided with the water 
this impression was soon corrected. How far or how 
high I was blown into the air I do not know, but I 
remember that my feet first struck the water and with 
the exception of being slightly hurt on my left side I 
suffered but little from the shock. It was not a laugh- 
able matter then, but it is now, when during the night 
we were clinging with a death grip to the wreck, a 
mule — another floating waif of this disaster — swam 
along and dumped us all into the river, compelling us 
all to exert our strength to regain our hold on the 
wreck. The current at times would compel the men 
to relax their grip and with the greatest difficulty they 
would recover it again. It is my opinion that the ex- 
plosion was caused by a torpedo having been placed in 
the coal by the Confederates at the last coaling station. 
One of the boilers of the Sultana had just been re- 
paired at Vicksburg. Many of the men who lost their 
lives were soldiers who had been prisoners for many 
months, some even for twenty months. 

23 



178 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 




N.*^Nv -^"•^Tn^-^ 



IRA B. HORNER. 

T WAS born in Ohio, in 1847. 
^ I enlisted in the service of 
the United States at Findlay, 
Ohio, October 25, 1861, as a 
private in Company K of the 
65th Regiment Ohio Volunteer 
^ Infantry, and was promoted to 
^^* corporal at Nashville, Tenn. 

I passed unharmed through 
all the engagements of my regi- 
ment until at the battle of Stone River or Murfrees- 
borough, December 31, 1862, where I was wounded in 
my left hip and thigh. At Chattanooga, Tenn., I re- 
enlisted in the same company and regiment, and as a 
corporal. During the second term I was most fortu- 
nate in escaping sickness and was leading a most 
charming life, but while in battle at Franklin, Tenn., 
November 30, 1864, my good fortune seemed to have 
forsaken me, and the worst of evils befell me — I was 
a prisoner in the hands of the Confederates. The day 
following our capture we were placed in a line and 
searched, and everything that would be of any value to 
them was taken from us. I had a new pair of boots 
which I was compelled to exchange for a pair of shoes 
two sizes too short for me, which had to be cut before 
I could wear them. I had a watch which I sold as 
soon as I entered the enemy's line for one hundred and 
fifty dollars confederate money. Also had thirty-three 
dollars of our money hidden under the cover of a pocket 
testament and as the men who were despoiling me had 



LOSS OF THE SULTAISTA. 179 

no use for the latter it was left in my possession and the 
treasure therein became the means of saving the lives of 
three comrades and myself. I bought one or two 
bushels of corn meal without which it would have been 
impossible for us to live. 

When we were to be exchanged and were passing out 
of the prison grounds the monster who had presided 
over our prison tortures said by way of parting, *' I 
had rather shoot every one of you than see you 
exchanged." 

The explosion of the steamer Sultana and my escape 
from a watery grave at first seemed like a horrid 
dream, but in a short time I learned it was reality. 
When first awakened from my slumbers it seemed as 
if some poor emaciated comrade had fallen upon me. 

The next I knew I was struggling and strangling in 
the water. I was not very well versed in the art of 
swimming; but fortunately for me a stick of timber 
came floating along. I grasped it and soon found- 
another, and by the aid of these I thought that there 
would not be much danger of my drowning. While 
clinging to the timbers a poor fellow clutched me by 
the legs, and for fear that he would drown us both I 
pushed him off, letting one of my socks go with him. 
Probably well I did so, for I should not have been 
able to have taken him with me. 

After getting through with this my attention was 
drawn to a brilliant light. Some comrades asked what 
light that was. Some said that it was the boat burn- 
ing and others that it was a boat coming to our rescue. 
Although I felt that I would not drown at the same 
time I did not feel comfortable from the fact that 



180 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

there was an alligator seven and one-half feet long 
keeping me company. 

While floating along on the timbers I heard a famil- 
iar voice hallooing to me, " Horner is that you? " I 
answered, *' Yes, what there is left of me." On my 
asking him what he was on he replied on a piece of 
the hurricane deck of the boat. I asked if it would 
be sufficient for me to come on with him, ''All right," 
he says, " Horner, come along." I could not see him 
but struck out and soon found him. The craft was 
only about four by six feet and two comrades were 
with him ; less fortunate than myself they could not 
swim. My timber was gone, therefore T had to re- 
main. Now there was a squad of four, two swimmers 
and two hangers on. One poor fellow was badly 
scalded as well as myself. We floated gently and 
peacefully along until we came to where the city 
guards were stationed ; they fired upon us not knowing 
what was the matter. Soon we arrived in sight of the 
city lights. I was well aware if we got any help outside 
of our own efforts we might get it there, so I hal- 
looed with all my strength and soon a party of two, 
with a small boat, came to our rescue. I felt like if I 
had all the world I would give it to those boatmen. 
They rowed us to a larger boat, the " Essex." There 
the attendants on board gave us something to drink 
from a canteen which set the blood in circulation, 
and also something to eat in the shape of hard tack 
and dried beef. 

After landing we marched up to the town of 
Memphis, I marching along in the city with only one 
sock, shirt and drawers on, but we felt fortunate to be 



L088 OF THE SO I/FA KA. 181 

alive and free. We were placed in the Gayoso UoHpital 
where we remained and were cared for about ten days. 
Before leaving we donned another suit of blue, then 
we went on board a boat bound for Cairo, 111. On 
arriving there we felt quite relieved to know that we 
were off the water. The next morning we went by 
rail to Mattoon, 111., where a bountiful repast was 
served, and also a ten dollar note was given to me 
which I gave a portion of to my messmates. The 
word had come that all Ohio soldiers that were able to 
be transported were to be sent to the State to be 
mustered out of the service as the war was over. Of 
course we wanted to go whether able or not, and of 
course I went though I went on crutches, being 
scalded and bruised on the left side and my left 
shoulder dislocated. 

We arrived at Columbus at the Seminary Hospital 
where we remained three weeks, then we were mustered 
out of the service by order of the War Department 
May 15, 1805. I arrived home on or about the 18th 
of May, 1865. The people at home looked on me as 
one of the dead, as they had learned that I was on the 
boat and they did not expect to see me alive again, but 
they did not know that I had learned to swim since 
they last saw me. If I had not learned to swim I 
should, without any doubt, have drowned. 

My present occupation is farming. My present post- 
office is Weston, Ohio. 



182 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

JACOB HORNER. 

T ENLISTED in the service of the United States on 
^ the 14th of August, 1862, for three years, at Nash- 
ville, Holmes county, Ohio, as a private in Company 
A, 102nd Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry. 

I was captured in the engagement before Athens, 
Ala., and made a prisoner of war on the 25th of Sep- 
tember, 1864, and taken to Cahaba, Ala., where I 
remained until the 14th or 15th of March, 1865, when I 
was paroled out and sent to Vicksburg, Miss., arriv- 
ing there on the 21st of March. I remained there 
until the 24th of April, when I went on board the 
steamer '^Sultana'' bound for Cairo, 111. We arrived 
at Memphis, Tenn., on the evening of the 26th of 
April. On the morning of the 27th of April, the 
steamer exploded one of her boilers and there were 
about one thousand four hundred and fifty (1,450) 
drowned and killed. My life was saved by swimming 
about two and a half miles and landing in the brush 
(the water had risen so high that it had overflowed its 
banks). 

As to the cause of this disaster I never knew. The 
number of passengers on board (according to what I 
have learned) was two thousand two hundred and fifty 
(2,250). This disaster, of which I am writing, was 
the greatest accident that ever happened during the 
war, and neither pen nor tongue can describe it. 

I was discharged from the service at Camp Chase, 
Ohio, on the 20th of x\iay, 1865. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 183 



W. A. HULD. 



T WAS born near Lucas, Richland County, Ohio, 
-^ May 19, 1841, and enlisted at Mansfield, Ohio, 
October 2, 1861, in Company A, 64th Ohio Volunteer 
Infantry. Was captured near Franklin, Tenn., Novem- 
ber 29, 1864, and confined in the Cahaba, Ala., prison. 

When the explosion occurred I was lying near the 
head of the stairs on the cabin deck, and was suddenly 
awakened by a terrible crash and nearly smothered 
with hot steam. 

I soon realized that a frightful disaster had occurred 
and heard the groans of the suffering and cries for help. 
Hastily making my way down the stairs to the bow of 
the boat, I found all was confusion. Men were shov- 
ing off gang planks, some tearing boards off on which 
to float, others walking through the crowded deck, 
seemingly crazed or wringing their hands and calling 
on God for deliverance. Others were crying, while 
many were being crowded off into the river by dozens 
and going down to a watery grave clasped in each 
others embrace. I made my way through the crowd 
down to the bow of the boat, picking up the hatch 
door on my way. I dropped it into the water and 
leaped after it, but unfortunately for me three other 
parties seized and got away with it. That gave me 
some room and I got out of the crowd without being 
hindered by anyone. I swam until my strength was 
about exhausted, when I saw, by the light of the burn- 
ing vessel, a small cotton-wood tree floating near with 
a man poised in its branches. When it came near 
enough I caught hold of the roots and held on. As 



184 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

soon as the man saw this he made serious objections, 
saying that it would not carry two men and that he 
could not swim a lick. To which I replied, *' 1 only 
wish to rest a minute and I will surrender the tree to' 
you." Slipping my suspenders from my shoulders and 
extracting myself from my government pants, I ap- 
plied all my strength to swimming again. In this way 
I toiled on, fighting the mad waters of the Mississippi, 
until to my great surprise I saw something in the 
darkness floating near by. I struggled towards it and 
laid my hand on a large plank, covered with pitch and 
gravel, which proved to be a part of the hurricane deck 
of the ^'Sultana." On this plank I floated for several 
hours, and as the day dawned on the morning of the 
27th of April, 1865, I was picked up by the steamer 
'' Bostonia " and carried to the city of Memphis, Tenn. 
My present occupation is that of a plasterer. Post- 
office address, Armourdale, Kansas. 



JOHN H. JAMES. 

T WAS born in Paris, Trumbull county, Ohio, Novem- 
■^ ber 13, 1844, and enlisted in the service of the 
United States at Limaville, Stark county, Ohio, Aug- 
ust 11, 1862, in Company F, 115th Ohio Volunteer 
Infantry. Captured near Nashville, Tenn., December 
4, 1864, and confined in the Meridian, Miss., and 
Andersonville, Ga., prisons. 

The first thing I knew of the explosion I found my- 
self under one of the fallen smoke stacks. I cannot 
tell how I got out. I floated and swam down the river 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 185 

until about sunrise. Was picked up by a gunboat 
yawl, more dead than alive. 

Occupation, wood finisher. Postoffice address, 707 
North Howard Street, Akron, Ohio. 



G. J. JOHNSON. 

T WAS born in Philipsburg, Alleghany county, N. Y., 
■* May 18, 1840, and enlisted in the service of the 
United States at Hudson, Lenawee county, Mich., 
August 21, 1862, in Company A, 18th Regiment Mich- 
igan Infantry, and was captured at Athens, Ala., Sep- 
tember 24th and confined in the Oahaba, Ala., prison. 

When the explosion took place I lay between the 
smoke stacks asleep. I remember jumping into the 
water, but knew no more until about sunrise, when 
I was picked up on the Arkansas side by the picket 
boat *' Pocahontas.^* 

Occupation, farming. Postoflfico address, Medina, 
Lenawee county, Mich. 



LEWIS JOHNSON. 

T WAS born in Henry county, Indiana, November, 
^ 1845, and enlisted in the service of the United States 
at Henry county, lad., December, 1863, in Company 
G, 9th Cavalry. Was captured at Sulphur Trestle, 
Ala., September 25, 1864, and confined in the Castle 
Morgan and Cahaba prisons. 



186 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

When the ** Sultana" exploded I was lying in front 
of the wheel house. I got up, and walked across the 
boat, pulled off my clothes and jumped into the 
water. I was burned very badly on my neck and 
shoulders. I swam out to some timbers on the 
Arkansas side and got on a log. There were nine 
of us on it. We were there until eight o'clock when 
we were taken in by a boat. 

Occupation, farming. P. 0., Muncie, Ind. 



BENJAMIN F. JOHNSTON. 

T ENLISTED on the 16th of August, 1862, at Almont, 
Lapeer county, Mich., as a private in Company A 
of the 5th Regiment Michigan Cavalry. Mustered in 
the United States service at Detroit on the 26th of 
August, 1862, and left Detroit for Washington, D. C, 
on the 6th of December, 1862, arriving there on the 
9th, and went into winter quarters on East Capitol 
Hill. Our regiment, in the spring, joined the army 
of the Potomac and I was taken prisoner on the 11th 
of June, 1864, at Trevillian Station, Va. Taken first 
to Libby Prison in Richmond, Va., and from there to 
Andersonville, Ga., where I was confined until the 
25th of March, 1865. I was paroled out and sent to 
Vicksburg, Miss., arriving at Black River on the 1st 
of April, 1865, crossed the river and went into camp, 
remaining there until the 24th of April, afterwards 
marching about four miles to Vicksburg where we 
went on board the steamer ** Sultana.*' 

My company being near the rear of the column 



loss OF THE SULTANA. 187 

would naturally fall on the lower deck and on the bow 
of the boat. We arrived at Memphis, Tenn., on the 
evening of the 28th of April, and the steamer stopped 
and unloaded three hundred hogsheads of sugar which 
detained her until nearly eleven o'clock at night. Left 
there about that hour and went up the river about four 
miles, where we stopped and took on a supply of coal 
to last as far as Cairo, 111., leaving the barges about two 
o'clock in the morning of the 27th, when, after steam- 
ing up the river three more miles, the explosion took 
place. 

Taking in the whole situation at a glance I got up, 
put on my shoes and waited for a favorable opportu- 
nity to leave the boat, realizing that I was safe on the 
boat as long as the fire did not affect me. When the 
opportunity presented itself I took off my blouse, hat 
and shoes, keeping on all my underclothing, and took 
an ambrotype likeness of my wife and boy, out of 
my blouse pocket and put it in my pants pocket so 
that if I was lost and ever found it would be the means 
of identifying me. I then put my left hand on the 
railing of the boat and jumped into the river and 
commenced swimming for the shore. After being in 
the water a short time a piece of board, about six 
inches wide and from six to seven feet long, came 
floating along in front of me. Having secured it and 
placed it under my breast I had no trouble in reach- 
ing an island, but on account of high water it was 
overflown. After a great amount of trouble I finally 
succeeded in getting out of the river into the fork of 
a small tree and remained there until eight o'clock, 
when I was picked up by a steamer and taken to the 



1S8 l.OSS OF THE Sri-TAXA. 

Soldiers' Homo at ^[omphis. Left there the second 
day for Michigan. "Was discharged from the service 
as a veterinary surgeon, at Dotroit, July 7, 1865. 



LOSB Oi' JJIE SUI/fANA. 



180 




A. A. JONES. 

T WAS born in Stow, Summit county, Ohio, on the 
* 25th of April, 1843. Lived with my parents on 
the farm. Enlisted in the service of the United 
States August 11, 18G:i, and mustered into the service 
September 18, 18G2, in Company C of the 115th Regi- 
ment Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Spent first year of 
service in the State of Ohio, mostly at Cincinnati, 
guarding paroled prisoners, looking after Morgan, 
quelling Vallandigham riots, etc. ; were ordered to Mur- 
freesborough, Tenn., in the summer of 1803. The regi- 
ment was distributed along the Kashville & Chatta- 
nooga railroad. Fifty or sixty of my company, myself 



190 LOSS OF THE SULTAN'A. 

included, were stationed at Fort Lavergne, where we 
remained until December 5, 1864, when we were 
unceremoniously taken under Gen. Forrest's wing 
who promised us a parole in a very short time. Not- 
withstanding, we were moved hastily into Dixie land, 
across Tennessee into Mississippi, and hardly halted 
until wo saw the inside of the filthy enclosure at 
Meridian, Miss., remaining there until the barefoot 
stragglers came up, feet bleeding and frozen, caused by 
the ice and snow that lay on the ground at that time. 
Many a poor fellow went to his long home on account 
of the cruel treatment of the enemy in taking away 
his boots and shoes. Arrangements were very soon 
made to remove us from here, as 'Pap" Thomas was 
making it rather lively for Hood about this time, and 
we were moved into Alabama, thence into Georgia, 
where we went into winter quarters in the most 
dreaded of all prisons, Andersonville. 

It must have been the last days of December when 
we arrived at this *'den of death." We remained there 
until the last of March, 1865, when some 2,500 men 
were sent ouVon exchange — arriving in camp at Black 
River, Miss., the fore part of April, 1865. Here it was 
we wrote the happy news to our parents, wives, and 
sweethearts that we would soon be with them at home. 
How our hearts leaped within us with anticipation. 
On the morning of April 25th the news came that trans- 
portation had been secured, and we were marched out, 
with light hearts, to Vicksburg where the ^'Sultana" 
lay awaiting us. It was not at all necessary to be 
invited to go on board, and as we did so we noticed 
the repairing of the boilers. Some 2,500 sandwiched 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 191 

ourselves as best we could until every available spot 
and place was occupied. 

The repairs of the boilers, the overcrowded condi- 
tion of the boat, the drunken captain, who furnished 
transportation — made everything blue — because the 
captain of the boat objected to taking on so many. 
These very important things were unnoticed by the 
comrades in their anxiety to reach home and friends 
once more. But the sequel proves we should have 
been more wary. Near the bow of the hurricane deck 
was the place selected by our squad who had stuck 
together through all our afflictions during the war. 

My health was very poor while at Andersonville. 
The hurried march into our lines, change of climate 
and diet, etc., made my case no better, consequently I 
was most miserable when I boarded the vessel, and 
asked as a favor of my comrades, Martin Baird and 
Kobert Gaylord, if they would permit me to sleep 
between them as we had only one blanket. They 
cheerfully consented, and although the nights were 
quite cold to us bloodless fellows, yet by being so 
closely packed we managed to keep three sides com- 
paratively warm. This was the position we occupied 
during the night of the 26th up to the time the crash 
came, which must have been about 2:30 A. m. What 
a crash ! My God ! My blood curdles while I write, 
and words are inadequate ; no tongue or writer's pen 
can describe it. Such hissing of steam, the crash of 
the different decks as they came together with the 
tons of living freight, the falling of the massive smoke 
stacks, the death-cry of strong-hearted men caught in 
every conceivable manner, the red-tongued flames 



192 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

bursting up through the mass of humanity and driving 
to death's door those who were fortunate enough to 
live through worse than a dozen deaths in that 
'^ damnable death pen'' at Andersonville. We had 
faced death day by day while incarcerated there, but 
this was far more appalling than any scene through 
which we had passed. 

Awakened with the dreamy whisper of mother, 
sister or other darling on our lips. But oh, what a 
change in one short moment ! Comrades imploring 
each other for assistance that they might escape from 
the burning deck ; officers giving orders for the safety 
of their men ; women shrieking for help ; horses neigh- 
ing; mules kicking and making the terrible scene 
hideous with their awful brays of distress. These are 
a few of the many scenes and sounds that greeted my 
sight and came to my ear. 

After a most desperate effort on my part I extri- 
cated myself from the section of the wreck that by the 
explosion had been thrown upon me. My sleeping 
comrades. Alas! where were they? Martin Baird 
that slept on my right and Robert Gaylord that slept 
on my left, where were they? God can answer, I can 
not as I never saw or heard of either of them after that. 
Poor fellows, they were kind to me and I trust that 
I may yet touch elbows with them across the river 
whose waters are so pure. I climbed as rapidly as 
my strength would permit to the railing on the edge 
of the boat and from there looked down on the awful 
scene below. The darting flames by this time lighted 
the whole panorama. Can I ever forget the scene? 
Not while my senses remain. Masses of drowning 



LOSS OF THE SULTA]S"A. 193 

mea clinging together until they were borne down by 
their own weight to rise no more alive. Their poor, 
pinched, and ghastly faces are indelibly engraved on 
my memory. 

Life is sweet, and all those scenes of destruction 
did not prevent me from thinking of the dear ones at 
home and how I was to save my own life. I climbed 
to the lower deck and grasped a plank. Was sliding 
it over the edge of the boat when a comrade asked per- 
mission to slide down. It was granted. When he 
reached the water he caused me to loose my hold ; then 
he moved off with it. This robbed me of what I first 
expected to save my own life on, but I bear no malice, 
my earnest wish being that the plank he robbed me 
of saved his life or that of some other comrade. I 
stood wondering what next to do, but as God was 
watching over me there was a way that soon proved 
to me that there was a power ruling over all stronger 
than man. A plank like the first floated from beneath 
the swell of the boat. As soon as I noticed it I 
sprang into the water, came up, and remained as near 
the boat as possible. I swam to the bow, then swam 
away as quickly as I could to avoid obstacles being 
thrown on me, as I had observed many a poor comrade 
pass to his watery grave in this manner. After get- 
ting a short distance from the boat on the Tennessee 
side there was something I took to be an island, as 
the flames by this time lighted far out on either side. 
I started, as I supposed, for the island but soon got 
into the current and, it being very swift and the plank 
large, I was swept down at a rapid rate and the water 
being very cold soon chilling my weak physical struc- 
25 



194 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

ture to such an extent that I gave up all hope of my 
reaching shore by any exertion of my own ; so I floated 
with the current. 

I cannot describe my feelings as I lay motionless on 
the plank, my lower limbs being benumbed and 
cramped so that I had no power over them. I never 
can forget the scene of horror as I looked upon it the 
last time. Those noble men who had faced battle in 
all its fury ; who had not flinched when the word ''for- 
ward" came, even though in the face of the cannon or 
screaming shell; had faced worse than death at Ander- 
sonville ; standing there on the bow of that burning 
boat wringing their hands, rushing to and fro begging 
and imploring their comrades to assist them that their 
lives might be saved to their dear ones! 

I floated on out of sight and hearing of that terrible 
picture until life in me was well nigh extinct. When I 
saw in the gray of the morning the street lamps at 
Memphis, when I realized this fact, I was more horri- 
fied than at any time, for the thought of going beyond 
that city into the wild region below, in that mad, 
rushing current, was enough to curdle the blood if any 
was left in my veins, which I doubt, for as I remember 
the sensation that every particle of blood had been 
forced to the uppermost portion of my brain by a one 
hundred horse power engine and that the top of my 
head would fly skyward. Providence stepped in again in 
my behalf when I so much needed assistance and hope 
had well nigh given away. I heard the dip of oars and 
felt a strong hand grasping and raising me from my 
faithful friend, the plank, and placing me in the bot- 
tom of a boat that was being used to patrol in front of 



LOSS OF THE SULTAITA. 195 

the city to pick up those whoVere floating down that 
far. I was taken to a wharf boat and as I was borne 
along by two strong men, two women (God bless them!) 
came forward with a blanket and wrapped it about my 
naked form. 

Comrades, will we ever realize what force there was 
back of the women of our country to aid and assist us 
in crushing out the life of the cruel war? This 
country owes them much for their untiring zeal, 
patriotism and courage. 

I was taken to the Washington Hospital as soon as I 
was able to sit up, where we received very kind treat- 
ment until we left for the North, two days later. 

My present postoffice is Parkman, Ohio. 



196 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 




NICHOLAS KARNS. 

I WAS born in McArthur, Ohio, on the 25th of De- 
cember, 1839. I enlisted in the service of the 
United States August 12, 1861, at McArthur, Ohio, as 
a sergeant in Company B of the 18th Regiment Ohio 
Volunteer Infantry, and mustered into the service at 
Camp Woolj Athens county, Ohio, in September, 1861. 
Our regiment being assigned to the Army of the 
Cumberland, I served under Gens. Buell and Rosecrans, 
and consequently was in the battles at Stone River and 
Chickamauga. Was captured on the second day's 
fight (September 20, 1863), at Chickamauga and was 
taken with several thousand prisoners to Richmond 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 197 

where we were searched and robbed of our valuables. 
I was assigned to the old Pemberton building where I 
remained about two months, and then I, in company 
with comrade Johnson, was taken to Libby prison 
where they confined us in darkness for thirty-six hours. 
We were then taken out and placed on Belle Isle where 
we remained the rest of the winter, and in the latter 
part of March, 1864, was taken to Andersonville, and 
remained there until September, when I was taken out 
and shipped to Millen, from there to Savannah, 
Blackshear, Thomasville, and was finally taken back to 
Andersonville, arriving there on the evening of the 
24th of December, 1864. We remained there until the 
latter part of March, 1865, when we were taken out 
and sent to Vicksburg, Miss. Here 1 would like to 
relate about the many happy changes, but space will 
not admit, neither can words express it. 

At Vicksburg we were put on the ill-fated steamer 
'* Sultana." All went along smoothly until one of 
her boilers exploded on the morning of the 27th of 
April, 1865. I was lying on the cabin deck when the 
explosion took place, and with the aid of a number 
of comrades secured a stage plank and launched it out 
into the deep, rough waters. 

Many were forced to let go and were drowned, but 
those that were fortunate stayed with the plank. We 
tried for some time in vain, to make to the Tennessee 
shore, but the current being against us we were drifted 
down stream until we lodged in some driftwood that 
had caught in an old tree top. I clambered through 
the drift until I reached a log where I found a Michi- 
gan comrade who divided his clothing with me, which 



198 LOSS OF THE SULTAI^A. 

was the means of saving my life as I was nigh chilled 
to death. When daylight came I made my way back 
to the old stage plank, where all hands joined in row- 
ing it to an old shanty and we climbed to the roof and 
remained there until about nine o'clock a. m., when 
the relief boat '* Jenny Lind" came to our rescue. 
I was then taken to Memphis and placed in the hospital, 
where I remained until after I drew my clothing. Was 
then taken by boat to Cairo, III., and from there by 
rail to Columbus, Ohio, where I was discharged from 
the service May 11, 1865. 

My present occupation is salesman. My present 
post office is Plain City, Ohio. 



E. J. KENNEDY. 

T WAS born in New York City, December 23, 1841, 
^ and enlisted in the service of the United States at 
Cleveland, Ohio, April 1861, in Company E, 7th 
Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Was captured at 
Cross Lane, West Virginia and at Franklin, Tenn., 
August 1861, and November 1864, and confined in 
the following prisons: Libby, New Orleans, Salis- 
bury and Andersonville. 

I was sound asleep when the explosion took place, 
and awoke to find myself in water. I managed to get 
hold of a piece of the wreck, and in company with one 
of my comrades stuck to this for nearly four hours, 
when we were picked up by a gunboat. 

Occupation — merchant. PostoflBce address, Berea, 
Ohio. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 199 

RINALDON KIMMELL 

V\7AS born in Williams Center, Ohio, January 22, 
1840 and enlisted in the service of the United 
States at Farmer, Ohio, September 11, 1861, in 
Company E, 21st Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry. 
Was captured at the battle of Chickamauga, September 
20, 1863, and confined in the following prisons; Pem- 
berton building, Richmond, Va. ; Dansville, Va. ; And- 
ersonville, Ga , — a prisoner for eighteen months and 
eleven days. 

He was on board the ''Sultana" when the boiler 
exploded, and asleep at the time. On awakening 
called to his partner Dunafin, who was sleeping with 
him, but received no reply. Could not swim, and the 
alternative of burning to death or drowning presented 
itself. He chose the latter. Securing a small board 
before leaving the boat, he threw it in and jumped 
after it, managing to get hold of it when it came to 
the surface ; it helped him through. He was among 
the first to leave the boat. Floated down to Memphis, 
just at daybreak, and was taken from the water nearly 
lifeless. Was not in his right mind for several hours. 
Left Memphis April 29th. Dunafin was never heard 
from. 

[R. Kimmel died March 25, 1891.] 



ALBERT W. KING. 



T WAS born at Eickerhofe, near Wittenberge, Ger- 
^ many, March 6, 1842. Came to Defiance, Ohio, 
March, 1849. Enlisted in Company D, 100th Regi- 



200 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

ment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, on July 17, 1862, at 
Defiance, Ohio. I was with said company and regi- 
ment until I was captured at the battle of Franklin, 
Tenn., November 30, 1864. In company with several 
hundred others captured at the same time was taken 
south. Our first experience in prison was at Meridian, 
Miss. Sometime It^ter we were transported to Ander- 
sonville, Ga., where we were exposed to all the weather 
during the winter months, consequently we suffered 
intensely. Our best clothes, blankets and tents had 
been taken from us when captured. 

Early in April, 1865, we were taken from the stock- 
ade and transported to our lines at Big Black river, 
near Vicksburg, Miss., and placed in parole camp. 
About the same time large squads of prisoners arrived 
from Cahaba and other prisons. Here we remained 
until we were furnished transportation on the steam- 
boat "Sultana" at Vicksburg. The trip to Memphis 
was very tedious, though pleasant in spite of the enor- 
mous crowd on the boat. We were on our way home, 
and everybody was cheered by the thought. John 
Davis, George Hill, William Wheeler, Adgate Fleming 
and I, all belonging to the same company, occupied a 
small space on the boiler deck, about twenty feet from 
the stern of the boat. We arrived at Memphis on the 
evening of the 26th. While the boat lay at the wharf 
sugar in hogsheads was being unloaded and we helped. 
When tired we went upon the streets of Memphis, but 
soon returned to the boat fearing it might leave us. 
When our steamer left Memphis we started for our 
lodging place. Some distance up the river the steamer 
made a stop at the coal barges and a supply of coal was 



LOSS OF THE SULTAKA. 201 

taken on. When the steamer was again under head- 
way we fell asleep. We had slept about an hour when 
the crash came. Men, coal, wood and timbers from 
the boat were thrown over and beyond us. The steam 
and ashes smothered us so we could scarcely breathe. 

Several seconds passed before I recovered sufficiently 
to know what had happened. When I came to my 
senses I rushed for the stern entrance, falling several 
times before I reached the fresh air. My four com- 
panions were soon by my side, having also escaped any 
serious injury from the explosion. Now hundreds of 
men came rushing out to get breath. Jamming and 
crowding commenced. Those crippled were trampled 
on. The high hanging bridge plank crushed many as 
it was cut down. The life boats were cut from their 
fastenings ; but in such an immense crowd amounted 
to mere nothing. The cabins over the boilers were 
shattered and torn out and soon that portion of the 
boat was on fire. Men called for buckets, but none 
were left on the boat, and in a few minutes later the 
fire assumed great proportions. Men, women and 
children in the cabins called for help. Men jumped 
from the upper decks to the water below. Hundreds 
had been blown into the water when the explosion 
occurred. It was an exciting scene. 

We could not see how any of us could be rescued. 
Not a boat in sight. The Tennessee shore was a half- 
mile away and the high water extended far back over 
the Arkansas flats. Our little squad of five were still 
on the stern deck trying to break off a large piece of sid- 
ing, but, on account of a large white horse fastened to 
the railing on the stern deck and directly in the way, 



202 LOSS OF THE SULTAITA. 

we did not succeed. Fleming had repeatedly asked 
us for God's sake to tell him what to do, that he could 
not swim. Our answer was, to avoid the big crowd 
and remain close to us, but when he saw that we were 
disappointed as to getting off the piece of siding he 
rushed into the crowd going overboard and was never 
heard of afterward. The fire was close on to us and 
we must soon leave the deck. Davis, Hill and Wheeler 
were now with me, but a minute later they had disap- 
peared I looked for something that would furnish a 
little support in the water but could not find any- 
thing. I climbed the stern railing and jumped far as 
I could to avoid the crowd just below me. When I 
reached the top of the water my head struck the boat. 
I had got turned in the water by coming in contact 
with drowning men. 

For a short time I was obliged to fight and keep out 
of the grasp of drowning men. Frequently I was 
pulled under but always gained the top. I used my 
best efforts to get away from the boat, and when I saw 
I could get out near the stern I worked fast to get 
away, when I was once more knocked under by some 
person jumping upon me. As I came to the top a 
lady was beside me grasping me and calling for help. 
I managed to get away but on getting a hold on some 
wreckage I returned and assisted her. Many others 
were near and around us calling for help. We were 
going toward the Arkansas side and in course of time 
we left the burning boat quite a distance. 

Toward morning it became so dark we could see 
nothing before us. Men in different directions could 
be heard calling for help. All this time my lady com- 



LOSS OF THE SULTAN^A. 203 

panion was quiet except that she would occasionally 
say ''for God's sake, tell me, do you think we will 
be saved ?" I said but little as I was beginning to fear 
that we were a long distance away from anything on 
which to rest, as it was quite dark and I could see 
nothing ahead of us. All at once, however, my feet 
came in contact with brush, this encouraged me, and 
I worked fast, fearing if it was an island under water 
we might accidentally pass it. I now saw that we were 
among small trees and brush, but my feet would not 
reach bottom. The current was sweeping over this 
island and it carried us down. Fortunately we were 
now within reach of a drift lodged against saplings. I 
soon discovered a log among the drift which I 
mounted. It sank partly, and I had no trouble in seat- 
ing my companion. I held her with one hand grasping 
the little tree next to me with the other. Our weight 
upon the log brought it down and we were in the water 
to our shoulders. In a few minutes we became so 
chilled that we could scarcely speak. Soon it was day- 
light, and no one in sight who might rescue us from 
our dangerous position. Later in the morning two 
men in a river yawl came near and were passing us 
when someone behind us called to them to run in as a 
man and woman were in the drift near him. They 
obeyed, and in a few minutes we were lying in the 
bottom of the boat. This gentleman who beckoned 
to the boatmen to pick us up first is Comrade L. G. 
Morgan, of Findlay, Ohio, for whom I have ever since 
had much regard. I have often met him since. 

We were taken to a shanty near by where quilts and 
blankets were thrown over us and we were placed in 



204 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

front of a fire. Several others were brought in soon 
after. George Hill of my company was among the 
number. He conversed with the lady, and while they 
were thus talking she drew a ring from her finger, 
handed it to me saying that all the valuables she had 
with her on the '^Sultana" were lost excepting that 
ring, and it was all she could at the time offer me as a 
token of reward. Later in the forenoon we were put 
on a steamer and taken to Memphis. On arriving here 
we separated. I was taken out to the Soldiers' Home, 
and the lady was no doubt taken care of by the 
doctors, at least I have never seen or heard from her 
since. 

Valmore Lambert of my company who slept in the 
cabins directly over the boilers was lost. John Davis, 
William Wheeler and George Hill of my company were 
rescued. 

My postoffice address is Defiance, Ohio. 



GEORGE A. KING 

C JSTLISTED as a private in Co. B, 2d Eegiment Ten- 
-■— ' nessee Cavalry, and was enrolled on September 1, 
1862, at Blount county Tenn. Was captured in Ala- 
bama while carrying a dispatch from Athens, Ala., to 
Gen. J. D. Morgan, near Tuscumbia, Ala., on the 10th 
of October, 1864. Was sent to Meridian, Miss., thence 
to Cahaba, Ala., and remained a prisoner until the 
spring of 1865. 

The destruction of the ^'Sultana" occurred near 
Memphis, Tenn., April 27, 1865. I was sleeping on 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 205 

the top of the boat when the explosion awoke me and I 
thought the boat was being fired upon by the enemy, 
but soon found what was the matter. I then stripped 
myself to try the water and went to the lower deck by 
a rope. I then went to the bow of the boat to get off. 
I thought that I would rather drown trying to save 
myself than to burn to death on the boat. After I got 
into the water I was struck by a piece of timber which 
disabled me. I was then caught by some one but 
managed to get loose. The water was a mass of men, 
some trying to make their escape and others drowning. 
•I went some distance from the mass and then steered 
for shore. I think I could not have reached it but for 
four men passing by me on a plank. I caught hold of 
the plank and rested a little, then got on. We five 
made for the timber, which we reached in safety. We 
went some three miles down the river and caught on 
to a tree and climbed up. Just after we got up five 
others landed there, though one was so weak he died 
in the water. We were taken on a boat about eight 
o'clock A. M. and were landed at Memphis. From 
Memphis we were taken to "Camp Chase," Ohio, 
thence to Nashville, Tenn. Was discharged from the 
United States service June 14, 1865. 

Occupation, farmer. Have been deputy sheriff for 
the last four years for my county. PostoflSce address, 
Tong, Blount county, Tenn. 




206 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

HUGH KINSER. 

T WAS born in Leesburg, Ohio, 
^ on the 4th of October, 1836. 

Enlisted in the service of the 

« 

United States at Leesburg, Ohio, 
on the 16th of August, 1863, in 
Company E, 50th Ohio Volun- 
teers. Was captured at the bat- 
tle of Franklin, Tenn., on the 
'^ 30th of November, 186-1, and 

taken to Cahaba, Ala., where I remained until about 
the 15th of March, 1865, when I was sent to Vicks- 
burg, Miss., to parole camp, where I remained about 
six weeks and then took passage on the steamer " Sul- 
tana " on the Sith of April, 1865. Landed at Mem- 
phis, Tenn., on the evening of the 26th, and took 
supper at the Soldiers' Home. The captain was very 
urgent that all should return soon so as not to be left. 
But notwithstanding his orders about two hundred 
failed to make their appearance and were consequently 
left in Memphis, which, as the sequel proved, was a 
lucky thing for them. About two o'clock in the 
morning of the Ji7th we pulled out of the coal yard, 
which is about seven miles above Memphis. The boat 
was very heavily laden, there being about 2,300 persons 
on board besides the freight. My messmate and my- 
self occupied a position on the upper deck toward the 
bow of the boat, just outside of the banister. I was 
sleeping soundly when, suddenly, I was aroused by 
the noise of the explosion. I arose to my feet and saw 
that the smoke stacks were both down. I looked be- 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 207 

low and saw that the boat was on fire. My comrade 
and I passed down to the lower deck, and the scene 
that met our eyes and the sounds that greeted our ears 
are beyond all description. My messmate, Johnny 
Carr, seized a board and said, '^ I am going to try to 
get out of this," and then sprang into the water. I 
watched him as long as he was visible, but he failed to 
carry out his purpose and must be numbered as one of 
the '* Sultana's '' victims. 

I was very weak from my long confinement in prison, 
but I was a very good swimmer and thought I would 
take my chances, so sprang into the water and swam a 
few yards, when my strength deserted me so fast that 
I saw it would be of no avail to continue and turned 
back. A rope had been thrown over and was hanging 
by the side of the boat to which two or three poor fel- 
lows were hanging. I took hold of this rope and 
climbed above them. Gradually the hold of each one 
lessened and they sank in the deep waters below. My 
own grasp was becoming weak, and I was sliding down 
the same way the others had done, when a piece of 
board came floating down and, with an effort, I threw 
myself upon it and in an instant some one jumped 
upon me and said '^ shove out of here." By much 
tact we managed to steer clear of others who were try- 
ing to grasp at something to save themselves. One 
more on the board would have meant death to us all. 
The current carried us down stream very swiftly and 
the glare from the burning boat upon the water 
blinded us so we could not see the timber along the 
banks, and in fact the water was so high at this time 
that the timber was overflowed. We came to a bend in 



208 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

the river and were out of sight of the burning vessel 
when we discovered there was timber about five or six 
hundred yards ahead of us and turned to go to it. 

At this point the swift current and dead water 
formed an eddy and we went whirling around. As we 
were going around a person caught on to our board, 
who said that she was a woman. After going around 
once or twice she let go and floated down on her own 
board, at the same time we floated out of this swift 
current and swam directly to the timber. We suc- 
ceeded in reaching a tree, the top of which was out of 
the water, and my companion climbed upon it while I 
swam to another one about twelve feet distant. While 
swimming from the eddy to the tree my fingers caught 
in a substance which proved to be a pair of pants with 
suspenders on them ; this was a lucky find for me as I 
had divested myself of all unnecessary clothing before 
I jumped into the water. When I reached the tree I 
was too much exhausted to lift myself upon it for 
some time. We had floated about three miles down 
the river and it was now getting daylight, giving me 
the opportunity of seeing the board which had proved 
to be 80 instrumental in saving my life. It was a pop- 
lar board about eight feet long, one foot wide, and 
three- fourths of an inch thick. My companion was in 
great distress as soon as he got out of the water and 
began to realize something of his condition. He was 
so badly scalded that his face, hands and whole body 
began to blister. Whether he is living or dead I know 
not. I have never heard from him since the second 
morning when I left him in the hospital at Memphis. 
I do not know his name, but his regiment was the 60th 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 209 

Ohio Volunteers. While we were clinging to the tree 
we saw in the distance the hull of the **Sultana" come 
floating down the river, with a dozen or more boys still 
clinging to the burning wreck. A mound of earth 
which had not been overflowed had formed a sort of 
island, and several of the men from the wreck had 
floated down and lodged on it, and as they discovered 
the men on the hull of the boat, as it came floating 
down, they quickly made a raft of logs and boards and 
went to their rescue. From our position in the tree 
we watched them go trip after trip until the last man 
was rescued. Before they landed the last man on their 
return trip the hull of the **Sultana" went down, its 
hot irons sending the hissing water and steam to an 
immense height. 

There were seven boats that came up the river to 
pick up the unfortunate. They spied my companion 
and I perched in the tree and came to where we were, 
there being a sufficient depth of water to make safe 
running. We were taken back to Memphis and placed 
in a hospital. After a day or two of rest I resumed 
my journey homeward. There are many incidents 
that are deeply fixed in my memory that occurred on 
that eventful morning, but space forbids me to men- 
tion them, but of all my war experiences of three years, 
including camp, march, battle and prison, there is 
nothing so fearful as that morning of terrors. 

My present occupation is farming. Postoffice address, 
Albion, Neb. 



27 



210 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 



HENRY J. KLINE. 



T WAS born in Blackford county, Ind., September 13, 
^ 1847, and enlisted in the service of the United 
States December 17, 1863, in Company G, 9th Regiment 
Indiana Cavalry. Was captured at Sulphur Branch 
Trestle, September 25, 1864, and confined in the 
Cahaba and Selma, Ala., prisons. 

At the time of the explosion of the "Sultana" I was 
sleeping in front of the wheel house, between Comrades 
King and Downey of my company. Both were lost. 
Comrade Downey had sent home for money from Vicks- 
burg. He went ashore at Memphis to see some friends, 
but the boat left him and he gave a man two dollars 
for bringing him in a skiff to the mouth of Wolf River 
where the boat stopped to coal. When he laid down 
he said: "If I had not sent home for that money I 
would have been left." I never heard him speak again. 
Comrade King sprang up at the first shock, exclaiming 
'*0h God, Oh mother! I am lost, I am gone." I fol- 
lowed him across the boat but lost sight of him. Our 
lieutenant, Swain, followed him in the river, still cry- 
ing. Swain (a splendid swimmer) got him on a plank 
and told him not to cry so ; that he would take him 
out safe. King hushed and never spoke again, the 
lieutenant swimming behind and pushing him on. 
The plank in front of him came to a drift in the woods. 
He pushed Charlie up against the drift and told him 
to climb up but he was too weak. Starvation, sick- 
ness, and the chill of the water had done their work, 
and as Swain swung around to get on the drift himself 
he saw Charlie's hands go under it. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 211 

But to go on with myself. At the time of the ex- 
plosion I climbed down from the hurricane to the 
boiler deck, and then divested myself of all my cloth- 
ing except my cap, shirt and drawers and then sprang 
into the water, on the lower side of the boat. It floated 
after me and the flames burned my neck and ears. I 
came very near drowning. Our company had seventeen 
men on board and eleven of them went down. 

Occupation, tile manufacturer. Postoffice address. 
Mill Grove, Ind. 



JOHN H. KOCHENDERFER. 

T WAS born in Lebanon county, Pa., on the 29th day 
^ of July, 1841, and enlisted in the service of the 
United States at Mansfield, Ohio, August 11, 1862, in 
Company D, 102d Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry. 
Was captured at Athens, Ala., September 24, 1864, 
and confined in the military prison at Oahaba, Ala., 
till in March, 1865, when I was taken to "Camp 
Fiske," the United States and Confederate neutral 
camp where I arrived on the 16th of that month. 

I, with others of my regiment, was placed on board 
the steamer " Sultana." Five of us took up our posi- 
tion outside the railing in front of the left wheel on 
the middle or cabin deck floor, with a blanket apiece 
over us and our coats for pillows. We were outside 
and over the four great boilers, one of which caused 
the great destruction of lives and untold sorrow 
through so many of our northern homes. When the 
explosion occurred it threw the boiler out of its bed, 



213 LOSS OF THE SULTAN^A. 

ascending and tearing its way through both cabin and 
hurricane decks. Those immediately over the boiler 
were thrown in every direction, some of them being 
thrown directly up and falling into the fiery chasm 
below, while those upon the side of the boat, like 
myself, were thrown directly out and away from the 
boat. The first I realized after the explosion I found 
myself about 300 feet from the boat shrouded in total 
darkness and in what appeared to be an ocean of water. 
To say that I was dumfounded would but faintly 
express my condition. But what was I to do; give up 
in despair and drown? No, never! As I arose to the 
surface and got full control of myself I tried to isolate 
myself from those around me and then took a survey 
of the situation. 

For a few minutes total darkness prevailed, then a 
small fire kindled itself and there being no effort made 
to check this little flame in a very short time it became 
a fierce conflagaration and the heat was intense, driv- 
ing the men back, those in the center and nearest the 
fire crowding those on the outer edge into the river 
until all were driven off. The boat burned and sank, 
when darkness again o'er all prevailed. But all this 
time, while the fire was doing its horrible work and 
the boat drifting with the current, I was about 100 
yards ahead floating down stream backwards and in a 
position to see the stern and one side of the boat where 
hundreds were dropping off into the river, the most of 
them going to their death. After watching them for 
awhile I became quite composed and fully realized my 
situation, and in company with another poor fellow I 
started out to find shore but failed. In our desperate 



Loss OF THE StJLTAlf A. ^13 

effort, fighting the waves and current, we became sepa- 
rated and I know not what became of him. 

Now I was alone, cold and tired. I began to look 
around for some support, which I found in the shape 
of an empty candle box which answered the purpose 
very well. This box I still had in my possession when 
picked up by a skiff eighteen miles below where the 
accident took place. I was brought back to Memphis 
and first put on a steamboat where I took the first 
whiskey I drank while in the service of the United 
States. I was taken to Gayoso Hospital, at which place 
I remained some three weeks before I was able to be 
moved, on account of an injury to the lumbar region 
of my spine by being thrown against a rope at the time 
of the explosion. 

I am a medical practitioner, residing at Gallon, Ohio. 



^14 



LOSS OF THE SULTAl^A. 




C. J. LAHUE. 

T WAS born in Harrison county, Ind., March 5, 1846. 
^ Enlisted in the service of the United States at 
New Albany, Ind., November, 1863, in Company D, 
13th Indiana Cavalry, and was captured at New 
Market, Ala., September 30, 1864, and taken to and 
confined in the following prisons, viz : Cahaba, Ander- 
sonville. Meridian Stockade and Selma, Ala., and was 
paroled at Black Eiver Bridge, Miss., and placed on 
the boat " Sultana" on the morning of April 34, 1865. 
This boat was destined for different points up the 
Mississippi river. Myself and three other comrades 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 21»5 

laid down to sleep in the rear of the pilot house, on 
the texas roof near the pilot house steps. About two 
o'clock A. M. the explosion occurred, killing the three 
comrades, (Theodore Baker of Company B, 13th Indi- 
ana Cavalry, I do not remember the names of the 
other two), and leaving me the only surviving one that 
was on the texas roof. I was thrown off the boat, but 
caught hold of the railing of the banister and remained 
in that condition until driven off by the flames of the 
burning boat, falling into the water on the upper side 
of the steamer as it swung around. The water was 
full of struggling and drowning people. I heard a 
lady crying for help, asking her husband to rescue her. 
She was holding to a rope attached to a mule that had 
got overboard. I also saw the husband, with a little 
child on his back, struggling in the water for a moment, 
then sinking. The lady cried out, " My husband and 
baby are gone! '' A comrade who had his limb crushed 
in the explosion by a door blown from the boat had 
the lady get on this door, through which means she 
was rescued. 

I was one of the last to leave the boat ; it was burned 
to the water's edge. I swam down the river and when 
opposite Memphis swam to some brush, where I found 
a log to cling to. I remained there until daylight. A 
lady discovered me and pointed me out to the captain 
of a boat, saying that there was a little boy on a log, 
in the brush, out on the river. The lady and two of 
the crew came in a boat and rescued me, and placed me 
on board the gunboat and wrapped me in blankets. I 
was not conscious of what was transpiring until the 
following evening. Was then placed in a hospital 



216 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

boat at Memphis. The lady who first discovered me 
in the brush took me to her own house and took care 
of me two weeks. Myself and forty-two others were 
sent north to Indianapolis, Ind., and from there we 
went home. 

My present occupation is stock-raising. PostofFice 
address. Great Bend, Kansas. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 



217 




ADAM LEAKE. 

T WAS born in Knox county, Tenn., April 15, 1842. 
■^ Enlisted in the service of the United States at 
London, Ky., on the 15th of November, 1862, in Com- 
pany B, 3d Regiment Tennessee Cavalry, and was cap- 
tured at Sulphur Trestle, Ala., September, 1864, and 
confined in the Cahaba prison. 

I boarded the steamer *' Sultana'' at Vicksburg. 
When the explosion occurred I was asleep on the cabin 
deck, outside the railing. Was knocked insensible by 
flying timbers and other missiles and knew nothing 



218 LOSS OV THE SULTAKA. 

until I found myself on the boiler deck near the wheel 
house. Then I realized a terrible calamity had oc- 
curred by seeing a perfect sea of people floundering in 
the water, some drowning, some grasping at objects, 
human and otherwise, all desperate at what seemed 
certain death. A horrible scene, in the contemplation 
of which my own condition was forgotten. With 
others I reached the bow of the ill-fated vessel and was 
standing near the jack-staff, when the wind veered and 
sent the flames in a solid mass against us, sending 
us in a body overboard. As I went over I grasped the 
cables in a coil and when going down continued to pay 
them out until I had secured a hold on their length 
that kept me above water and thus saved myself, as I 
could not swim at all. 

I remained in the water about three and one-half 
hours, when the hull of the destroyed "Sultana" 
grounded on the Arkansas side and myself and such 
comrades as hung on with me were rescued by means 
of old gunwales lashed together and extending to 
dry land a hundred yards away. The hull sank 
within five minutes after. 

My postoffice address is Knoxville, Tenn. 



ASA E. LEE. 

T WAS born in Galesburg, 111., April 14, 1847, and 
-■• enlisted in the service of the United States at Clin- 
ton, Ind., June 17, 1863, in Company A, 71st Regiment 
Indiana Volunteers, or 6th Indiana Cavalry. I was 
captured at Florence, Ala., October 3, 1864, and taken 



LOSS OF THE StJLTANA. 219 

to Meridian, Miss., where I was confined sixty-one 
days, and afterwards taken to Cahaba, Ala., where I 
remained one hundred and forty-days, or until about 
April 21, 1865, when I was taken to Vicksburg, Miss., 
for exchange. 

I, with others, was placed on board the steamer 
"Sultana," and on the night of the terrible disaster 
was asleep on the hurricane deck, near the pilot house, 
with my bunk mate, John May, of Terre Haute, Ind., 
a member of the 137th Regiment Indiana Volunteers, 
when the explosion took place. I was thrown to the 
forecastle, striking on my back and shoulders and was 
severely bruised by the fall. I have never seen or 
heard from my bunk mate since the evening we closed 
our eyes in sleep just before we left Memphis, and I 
have met only three of the '' Sultana " survivors since 
May 10, 1865. 

I left the boat while it was wrapped in flames, and 
after swimming nearly two miles I succeeded in getting 
on a log in the river, where I remained for about five 
hours and was then taken up by the steamer '* Silver 
Spray" and carried to Memphis, at which place I 
remained about six days and was then sent north on 
the steamer "Belle Memphis" to Cairo, 111., and 
from there to Indianapolis. There were nine of my 
regiment on board the " Sultana," of which six were 
lost. 

My present occupation is carpenter and builder, and 
my postoffice address Tulare, Oal. 



iitO r.OSS OF THE SULtANA. 



WESLEY LEE. 

T BUNKED on the front part of the cabin deck, 
between the two stairways, and was asleep when 
the explosion took place. I sprang to my feet at the 
noise, and in doing so struck my head against the 
deck above, which had been smashed down and was 
supported by the railing around the stairs. I then 
crawled to the side of the boat and looked over the 
deck above. Just then the flames shot up from about 
the center of the boat with that crackling sound you 
all remember so well. I looked on the river at that 
terrible scene — a sea of heads. Oh, what a sight it 
was! It is just as vivid in my mind today as it was 
then. The hungry fire was fast eating toward me. 
Then I slid down a fender to a lower deck, took oif my 
shoes, socks, blouse and pants, tore two narrow pine 
boards from the center of the stairway, walked to the 
side of the boat and jumped off, starting for the Ten- 
nessee shore, and was making fine headway as I sup- 
posed. However, on turning on my side to swim and 
so rest myself in a short time the water was tumbling 
around me and I looked for the shore but it seemed 
as though it was farther away. I could just see it in 
the distance. Then I looked up the river and saw an 
island, but I was too far below to try to stem that 
fearful current. A.bout this time I saw a steamboat 
coming down the river toward the burning wreck, but 
soon after I was left in darkness. A little incident 
happened just then. Some person who had got be- 
yond the island came across in front of me, and in a 
firm and manly voice said, "Don't take hold of me." 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 221 

I answered, "I will not as we have plenty of room." 
I mention this for if he is living I would like to know 
who he is and where he is. He passed to the rear 
and was soon out of sight. 

After I had been in the water a long time, and 
making poor headway, I became satisfied that the cur- 
rent was running to the other side of the river, but 
would it do to change my course? I concluded not to, 
for perhaps the river would soon make a turn and then 
the current would favor me. I was beginning to feel 
very cold and put forth every effort to reach the shore, 
keeping my boards in such a position that the current 
running against them would draw towards the shore ; 
the voices of those in the river were in the rear 
and I began to make a little headway and soon the 
lamps in the city became visible. Then I worked all 
the harder, but it was necessary for I was getting 
colder all the time. The thought of home, however, 
together with the determination of a soldier '' to live 
as long as he can," bore me up. When I came in front 
of the wharf boat, two men came out with a lantern 
and I called for help. One of them jumped in a skiff 
and was aoon by my side, took me in and in a short 
time I was by a fire in the wharf boat, where I was 
given some clothing. Then they asked me what the 
matter was, and when I informed them the "Sultana" 
had blown up and her crew was in the water, the tele- 
graph operator went to his instrument and in a few 
minutes a steamer was moving out and picking up 
men. 

By the time I was well warmed the steamer "Gen- 
eral Boynton" came to the wharf boat and put off 



2S2 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

some men it had just picked up. Then the telegraph 
operator came to me and asked me if I cared about 
being mentioned as the person who gave the informa- 
tion of the disaster, as it would do me no good and 
the river men would get pay for it. I told him it 
made no difference to me, but I see by some articles in 
the National Tribune, that the steamer '* General 
Boynton," gave the news, which is not correct. 
Postoffice address, Winston, Mo. 



THOMAS G. LOVE, alias THOMAS LONG. 

T WAS born in Providence, Rhode Island, January 
^ 13, 1843. Enlisted in the IJDited States navy — my 
second term — at Chicago, November 4, 1864, for two 
years or during the war. I was sent to the ironclad 
** Essex,'' stationed at Memphis, Tenn. Was rated 
quartermaster and was on watch at the time the steamer 
** Sultana" left the wood dock about half a mile above 
the " Essex " and was near the mouth of Wolf river. 

The " Sultana " left the wood dock about two o'clock 
in the morning of April 27, 1865, and steamed up the 
river. At twenty minutes of three she blew up at a point 
seven miles above Memphis, and at twenty minutes past 
three I heard the cries of drowning men calling for 
help. I reported to our captain, John Atchiuson, and 
he jumped out of bed and ordered all hands called, all 
boats manned and to be away and save all that we 
could. I had charge of one of the boats, the " Sky- 
lark," and helped to save seventy-six of the men from 
a watery grave, and when all our boats were gone 



LOSS OF THE SULTAN^A. 223 

except the market boat, called the ''dingey," our six 
messenger boys took it and saved the only woman that 
was saved who was on board the " Sultana." The 
people of Memphis sent us a barrel of whiskey in the 
morning, but our First Lieutenant, Wm. Berry, broke 
in the head of the barrel and poured the contents on 
to the deck. The firemen and coalmen that were left 
on board caught the whiskey in buckets as it ran down 
the scuppers and some got quite Jolly, whereas, if it 
had been served out to the men as was intended there 
would not have been any one drunk. 

The men in the boats worked hard without any 
breakfast and then we hunted for those that had 
strayed off into the swamps, trying to get to the dry 
land. All that day we found men almost dead, hang- 
ing to the trees about two miles out into the river, 
and among those that I rescued was one man so badly 
scalded that when 1 took hold of his arms to help him 
into the boat the skin and flesh came off his arms like 
a cooked beet. I lost my hold on him but soon 
caught him again, and with help he was got into the 
boat and saved from a watery grave. I heard of the 
reunion of the survivors of the ''Sultana.'* that was 
held at Adrian, April 29, 1890, and went to see if I 
could meet with any of those whom I saved, and had 
the pleasure of taking the above described man by the 
hand. It was v/ith a grip that did not slip as when I 
went to pull him into the boat. I met another man 
that I picked up from a bale of hay. There were 
nine trying to hold to it and a piece of log. I saw 
|iwenty-one men on one log that was drifting in the 



224 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

river. I took off part of them and called another 
boat that took the rest. 

I was through all of the war, this being my second 
term, but the horror and sufferings of that morning I 
never saw approached. Pen can not write or describe 
it, tongue can not tell, and mind can not picture the 
despair of 2,300 scalded and drowning men in a cold 
deep river on a dark night, with the current running 
twelve miles an hour, and those men just released 
from prison, not half-fed nor quarter clothed. They 
did not have the strength to battle with a trial like 
that. It was the most heart-rending scene that I 
ever witnessed. I hope to never see the like again. 

My present occupation is that of general merchant, 
and my post office address is Clayton, Mich. 



WILLIAM LUGENBEAL 

C NLISTED in the service of the United States as a 
■^ private in Company F of the 135th Regiment 
Ohio Volunteer Infantry, at Columbus, Ohio, May 2, 
1864. Was captured at North Mountain, West Va., 
July 3, 1864, and was taken to Andersonville, Ga., 
July 27, 1864; remained in the stockade until October 
1, 1864. I went out on parole of honor and helped 
build six sheds on the south side of the prison, my 
quarters were near the depot and I could go a mile 
from my quarters without any guard. When I got 
out of prison I weighed only a hundred pounds, but 
when I was on my homeward trip I weighed one hund- 



LOSS OF THE SULTAKA. 225 

red and sixty-six pounds — so much for stealing sweet 
potatoes and peanuts. 

March 27, 1865, I left Andersonville and was sent to 
the Black River, Miss., for exchange, and thence to 
'^Oamp Fiske," which is two miles back of Vicksburg, 
where I remained about three weeks. While here 
President Lincoln was assassinated. We then went on 
board the steamer ^' Sultana," and on the evening of 
April 26th we landed at Memphis, Tenn. While there 
I laid down to sleep. They took on coal and started 
again for God's country. Went about seven miles when 
I was awakened by a terrible roar and crash. I was on 
the second deck, my partner's name was Joseph Test, 
from Dayton, Ohio. A piece of timber ran through 
his body, killing him almost instantly. I tried to help 
him but could not. Then I went down stairs and the 
like I never saw and hope I never will again. The 
boat was now on fire. Reader! Imagine you are on a 
burning boat with twenty-one hundred men, on a dark 
night, what do you think you would do? Well, I will 
tell you what I did. 

On board the boat was a pet alligator. He was kept 
in the wheel-house. It was a curiosity for us to see 
such a large one. We would punch him with sticks 
to see him open his mouth, but the boatmen got tired 
of this and put him in the closet under the stairway. 
When I came down stairs every loose board, door, 
window and shutter was taken to swim on, and the fire 
was getting very hot. I thought of the box that con- 
tained the alligator, so I got it out of the closet and 
took him out and ran the bayonet through him three 
times. While I was doing this a man came to me and 
29 



226 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

said the box would do for he and I both to get out on. 
My intention was to share it with him, but I did not 
speak and I do not know what became of him. I took 
off all my clothing except my drawers, drew the box to 
the end of the boat, threw it overboard and jumped after 
it but missed it and went down somewhere in the mighty 
deep. When I came up I got hold of the box, but 
slipped off and went down again. When I arose to 
the surface again I got a good hold of it and drew my- 
self into it with my feet out behind, so that I could 
kick, the edges of the box coming under each arm as 
it was just wide enough for my breast and my arms 
coming over each edge of the box ; so you see I was 
about as large as an alligator. 

There were hundreds of men in the water and they 
would reach for anything they could see. When a man 
would get close enough I would kick him off, then 
turn quick as I could and kick someone else to keep 
them from getting hold of me. They would call out 
''don't kick, for I am drowning,'' but if they had got 
hold of me we would both have drowned. It was 
about six miles from land. While the boat was burn- 
ing we could see the trees on the shore, and kept our 
heads that way and swam fast as we could, but the 
boat burned down, sank and left us in utter darkness. 
We could not tell which way to go and it was a very 
lonesome place to be in. 

Now I would only try to steady my box when I 
would get in those whirls as I floated down the river. I 
can speak of seeing two men after I started on my 
voyage; it was now very dark and I could see an object 
only a few feet. The first man I met in the darkness. 



LOSS OF THE SULTAKA. 227 

that lonely night, as he was passing me said, " Here 
goes your old tug boat." I did not answer him, as I 
had tug enough of my own. The next man that came 
near me asked which way we were going. He asked 
me a third time and said that he believed that we 
were going right down, meaning we were floating down 
the river. 

I was taken up three miles below Memphis by a 
gun boat called the ''Essex," and was taken from 
there to the Gayoso Hospital; was put in ward A, 
remained there some days, drew clothing and got on 
board the ''Belle of St. Louis," came to Cairo, 111., 
and then to Columbus, Ohio. 

Present address, Perryton, Licking county, Ohio. 




W. p. MADDEN. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 229 

T WAS born in Gal way, Ireland, on the 14tli of March, 
^ 1844. Enlisted at Springfield, Ohio, on the 9th of 
October, 1861, in Company I, 44th Ohio Volunteer 
Infantry and 8th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Was 
captured at Lynchburgh on the 18th of June, 1864, 
and confined in Andersonville prison. 

On the morning of the 27th of April, 1865, at about 
two o'clock, I was asleep dreaming of home and loved 
ones, of whom I had not heard a word for about ten 
long months that I had spent in Andersonville prison. 
Suddenly I was awakened by an upheaval and crashing 
of timbers. I attempted to arise from my recumbent 
position and as I threw up my hands to explore my 
surroundings I got them severely burned, and was hor- 
rified to find that my efforts to extricate myself were 
fruitless and the heat was stifling. I could not tell 
where I was, but could hear the groans of the wounded 
and the shrieks of the women mingling with the crack- 
ling noise of the flames and the hissing of the white 
steam that enveloped the boat for a time. All of this 
took place in a few moments, but those few moments 
were an eternity to me. No tongue can tell and pen is 
powerless to portray the agony of those moments. 
Thoughts went rushing through my brain with light- 
ning rapidity. I thought of all I had suffered and en- 
dured for ten months and of the joys anticipated at 
home, and now so near the goal must I give up the 
ghost? Not without a struggle. The rebels had failed 
to kill me in battle, or to starve me to death in 
prison. I wrapped my blanket about me in order to 
protect myself from further violence from my hot en- 
vironments. I called in the name of my Divine Master 



230 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

for some one to remove whatever hindered my escape, 
and may God bless whoever he may be that removed 
the obstruction — I know him not. I crawled out as 
black and begrimed as a coal digger. I then discov- 
ered that I had been under a piece of boiler iron about 
a half of a circle, both ends being blocked with tim- 
bers and debris thrown hither and thither by the force 
of the explosion. 

I had a much esteemed friend by the name of George 
Menenger, a Piat Zouave. His home was in Cincin- 
nati, Ohio. He shared my blanket, but what became 
of him I have not been able to learn, nor is it to be 
wondered at in the confusion that followed the ex- 
plosion. This was a time when strong men, who never 
faltered before the galling fire of the enemy's front, 
were powerless, wringing their hands and rending the 
air with their piteous cries. No one now gave the 
orders, each being left to battle for himself. The 
deck was broken in two, presenting a fiery chasm 
between like Dante's "Inferno." Burning human 
forms could be seen below until the river was obscured 
by the flames which soon communicated with the 
upper deck. Every available thing that would float 
was hastily gathered up and with precious freight went 
overboard, but often only to be submerged by the 
addition of others and rise again on some distant wave 
far away and unoccupied, to be again possessed by 
another struggler and borne safely with the current 
until rescued by friendly hands. 

Almost invariably the means of escape was over- 
burdened, and it was often the case that parties were 
drowned that others might use their floats to a practi- 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 231 

cal advantage. No doubt many a good swimmer lost 
his life by being made powerless by the icy waters of 
the northwest with which the Mississippi river is flushed 
at that time of the year. 

All this time I was endeavoring to keep from being 
pushed into the river by my wild and distracted com- 
rades who were rushing to and fro. In order to do 
this I had to lie down often at the risk of being 
trampled upon. I remained on the boat as long as 
the heat would permit, seeing that it would be fatal 
to launch myself among the floating sea of perishing 
humanity, grasping at everything within reach and 
often carrying to the bottom those that would have 
otherwise escaped. I was fortunate in being a very 
good swimmer, and with confidence in my ability to 
reach shore I waited until the coast was clear. I 
then made a running jump from the fore and upper 
deck, but before reaching the water I lost my balance 
and fell face downward knocking the breath out of me 
and producing an inguinal hernia, which I now carry, 
much to my discomfort. This hurt caused me to 
swallow at the time a large quantity of water, causing 
strangulation, so that it was with the greatest difficulty 
that I again reached the surface. After I got my breath 
I swam down stream in a diagonal direction for the east 
bank, but for some unknown reason I changed my mind 
and turned for the west side. I now began to experi- 
ence a peculiarly numb sensation commencing in my 
great toes and extending upwards. Being thoroughly 
awake to the meaning of all this I bestirred myself 
to the most vigorous and active kicking that I ever 
did in my life. Now and then I would pinch my 



23-^ LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

limbs but could not make them believe that it was I, 
and yet, as long as they kept kicking, I felt safe. 
They had often served me and, when a boy, they had 
saved me many a whipping and they did not fail me 
on this occasion. 

Somewhere between the boat and the shore T over- 
took three soldiers, of whom I recognized one, a ser- 
geant of an Illinois regiment, a fine specimen of a man 
in every particular and I always admired him. He, 
with the other two, was trying to keep above the water 
with the aid of a very trifling bit of board. One of 
the party was about exhausted. I swam to them put 
my hands on the board and had this man put his arm 
on my shoulder and his other on the sergeant and we 
pushed on, but it was soon evident that our load was 
going to overtax our strength. With no evidence at 
hand of the distance yet to overcome, and as he was 
already past helping himself, true to the first law of 
nature I released myself, and our friend went down to 
be seen no more. Could I have perceived the short 
distance to the shore I would have saved his life, but 
so dark was it that the first intimation that I had of a 
shore was when I struck my head against a lot of drift, 
upon which I dragged myself at the same time shout- 
ing back to those I had parted with my deliverance 
and encouraging them to persevere and soon I had the 
pleasure of helping them to a place of safety. 

I then removed my pants and shirt, wrung the water 
out of them and put them on again, then went at 
vigorous walking, as did also my friend from Illinois, 
but the other we had to pull along between us until a 
better circulation was obtained for him, after which 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 233 

we got along very well considering our condition. 
About seven or eight o'clock in the morning we were 
taken onboard the steamer ''Bostonia" and taken to 
Memphis. 

Here I want to digress a little to speak a word of 
praise in behalf of the mate, who, with the pilot, was 
blown into the river. It was he, with the aid of a skiff, 
conveyed us to the boat and although wet and chilled 
he did not cease his efforts in caring for others as long 
as there were any found needing assistance. Even on 
the boat, where hot coffee and fire was accessible, he 
looked not for his own comfort until all others were 
first served. This self-sacrificing and unselfish devo- 
tion to the wants of others is seldom found, and I 
mention this as an expression of my admiration for his 
conduct on that occasion. 

Thanks to Gen. Washburn in a few days we left 
Memphis for '^ Camp Chase," Ohio, to be mustered 
out of service in obedience to telegraphic orders from 
the War Department. And now, glorious transition. 
Away from the late scenes of horror, caressed and 
adulated by those who long ago gave me up for dead, 
and providential blessings through those years that 
have passed, have done much to compensate for what I 
have suffered. But oh, how many a sad and desolate 
homel Who can tell of the anguish in those hearts which 
fondly waited for the coming of the dear one. 

Let us reverently treasure up in our hearts the 
memory of the brave dead of the "Sultana," and let 
our Association devote one day of its sittings in some 
appropriate way to commemorate their deeds of virtue. 

I am engaged in the practice of medicine at Xenia, 0. 



234 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 



JOTHAM W. MAES. 

T WAS born in Huron county, Ohio, November 15, 
^ 1842, and enlisted in the service of the United 
States at New Boston, Mich., June 15, 1861, in Com- 
pany B, 47th Kegiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry. 
Served with my regiment in all its campaigns till on 
the 22d day of July, 1864, when I was captured in 
front of Atlanta, G^a., and taken to Anderson ville. I 
remained there until Sherman began his famous march 
to the sea, when I, with others, was removed to Millen, 
thence to Savannah, from there to Blackshear Station, 
thence to Thomasville, and at last marched sixty miles 
across the country and put on board the cars at Albany 
and taken to Andersonville again, entering that ter- 
rible prison on Christmas eve, 1864. 1 remained here 
until about the 17th day of March, 1865, when five 
hundred of us were taken out and sent to Jackson, 
Miss., and from there marched to the Big Black Hiver, 
where we were received by our own men, and given a 
ration of hard tack and coffee, with a good suit of new 
clothes, a blanket and a tent. 

We remained at Big Black River until exchanged 
and put on board the '* Sultana.'' Myself and two 
comrades bunked together, just back of the left wheel 
house, on the middle deck. The first sensation I 
experienced was that of falling down through space, as 
probably many of you have felt when you had an 
attack of nightmare. I soon realized that it was no 
nightmare for we were immersed in the icy water of 
the river, about three by ten feet of the portion of the 
deck upon which we were sleeping having been blown 



LOSS OF THE SULTAiq^A. 235 

with its occupants into the river. The shock of the 
deck striking the water threw us all off from it, but 
we soon found it again and others came to us until 
that small piece of deck saved ten lives. The way we 
managed was to keep evenly divided around the edge 
and just float along. I shall never forget the terrible 
scene that I beheld as I glanced back at the boat and 
realized what had occurred. The smokestacks of the 
''Sultana" were lying criss-cross, crushing whoever 
they struck. The boat was on fire and the flames were 
driving the men into the water by the hundred, and no 
matter how good a swimmer a man might be if he 
got into one of those crowds his doom was sealed and 
he would go down with the clutching mass. 

As we came in sight of the coal bins opposite 
Memphis we attempted to make them but the current 
carried us away so that we could not, neither could we 
reach the Memphis shore nor make the people on 
either bank hear us. We floated some three or four 
miles below Memphis before we were picked up and 
were then found by a quartermaster's yawl, and when 
taken in were so thoroughly chilled that we could not 
help ourselves. As we were making for the shore at 
Fort Pickering the troops mistook us for guerillas 
from the Arkansas side of the river trying to capture 
the fort and fired two volleys on us before they found 
out their mistake. Fortunately no one was hurt. We 
were taken to Memphis, and soon sent to Columbus, 
Ohio, thence to Jackson, Mich., and soon discharged. 

My present postoffice address is New Boston, Mich. 



336 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 



JERRY MAHONY. 

T WAS born in Irelaad, December 23, 1842, and 
^ enlisted in the service of the United States Sep- 
tember 23, 1861, at Detroit, Mich., in Company I, 2nd 
Eegiment Michigan Cavalry. Was captured at Flor- 
ence, Ala., November 9, 1864, and was confined in the 
Meridian and Cahaba, Alabama, prisons. 

My capture was as follows : When Sherman marched 
to the sea he sent Stanley to reinforce him, but Hood 
was nearer to Nashville than Stanley. Hood had Lee, 
Stewart and Cheatham. Lee crossed the Tennessee 
river at Florence, Ala. Stewart and Cheatham were 
still oa the south side. I was sent for by Gen. Crox- 
ton, who asked me if I would go at night and cut the 
pontoon bridge at Florence, Ala. I could go alone or 
take some comrade with me. He said there was 
nothing I could ask the government for but that I 
could have it. I could have a commission, a furlough 
or anything else, and he would open communication 
with the '*rebs" at daylight and exchange us, if it 
took one hundred for one. I started with five others. 
We got some citizens' coats and putting them on 
arrived at the bridge at two o'clock A. m., and, as the 
" rebs " stated in the newspaper the next day: '*While 
portions of that army were on each side of the river, 
a party of bold federals came down the river in skiffs 
and succeeded in cutting the bridge in two or three 
places. Hatchets were found in their possession. It 
is one of the boldest of federal raids during the cam- 
paign." We got rid of the coats before we were taken 
prisoners. That night we were kept in a vacant 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 237 

store, and while the guards slept three of the comrades 
got away but they failed to cut the bridge. I drew the 
attention of the guard at the door by selling my watch 
that was hid in my boot leg. They (my three com- 
rades) went up stairs and got out of the window. They 
were missed in three or four hours and the blood 
hounds were sent after them, but they had crossed the 
river. I had no one to help me get away, so I staid. I 
never saw or heard of them after that. I received a 
seven month's furlough, and then was paroled when 
the rest were. 
Address, 3249 LaSalle street, Chicago, 111. 



JESSE MARTIN. 

T WAS born in Louisville, Ky., February 19, 1842. I 
^ enlisted in the service of the United States at 
Rona, Ind., September 5, 1861, in Company D, 35th 
Indiana Infantry. Was captured at Kenesaw Moun- 
tain, Ga., June 19, 1864, and confined in the follow- 
ing prisons: Andersonville, Savannah, Millen and 
Blackshear. 

I was sleeping in the deck room when the explosion 
occurred. At first it seemed to me as though some 
one was on my breast with his knees and choking me 
with his hands. When I came to I was down on my 
knees by a cow, as though I had got there to milk her. 
If the cow had not stopped me I guess I would have 
gone on into the wheel house, and then I would not 
have survived to write this. The wheel was still 
turning and water coming in on me which helped to 



238 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

bring me to. I soon found out what the matter was 
and be^an to look around to see what chance there 
was to escape. I started to see if I could find some of 
my regiment but could not get to where I had left 
them. I then went aft to see how things were. All 
was confusion. Some were praying, others crying or 
swearing, and some jumping overboard. I found one 
man who seemed to be taking things coolly. I went to 
him and asked him if he would help me throw things 
to those in the water to swim on. We went to work 
throwing over anything we could find that would float 
excepting a large plank. This we saved for ourselves. 
We stayed on the boat until the fire drove us off. We 
then threw the plank in and jumped in after it but 
lost it. I never saw the man after that. I started to 
swim ashore and happened to find a small piece of 
plank which helped me along. I landed on an island 
and was picked up by the steamer "Pocahontas." 
Occupation, farming; Mount Pleasant, Ohio. 



JOSEPH H. MAYES. 

T WAS born in Parke county, Ind., August 31, 1846. 
^ Enlisted in the service of the United States at 
Waveland, Montgomery county, Ind., on the 12th of 
November, 1861, in Company 0, 40th Regiment Indi- 
ana Volunteers, and was captured at Franklin, Tenn., 
November 30th, 1864, and confined in the Cahaba 
prison in Alabama. 

I was on the cabin deck of the "Sultana" when the 
boiler exploded. One of the smoke stacks about six 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 239 

feet from me fell and broke the deck in and I went 
through onto the lower deck. I noticed that every man 
had to take care of himself. I could not swim, so I 
got four slats one inch thick, three inches wide and 
about ten feet long, and took my tent rope and tied 
them together — then I was ready. I picked up the slats 
and jumped into the river and started to "paddle my 
own canoe.'' I got along finely until a drowning man 
caught me by my ankle. I kicked him loose and then 
tried to pull for the shore. Sometimes I would get 
within fifty yards of the shore and the current would 
carry me toward the other side of the river and then I 
would try for that side, but it would strike me again ; 
so I just kept floating back and forth across the river. 
I came across a man from a Michigan regiment, I said, 
"hullo, comrade, advance and give the countersign." 
I asked him if he could swim. He said no. Then I 
asked him what kind of a plank he had ; he replied, 
"one about two feet wide and ten feet long." We 
two got together and tried to reach the shore, but the 
current would carry us back and forth across the river 
as before, and by this time we were getting cold and 
somewhat discouraged. 

The man from Michigan said he would have to let 
go and drown. I told him that would never do, and 
urged him to hold on. By this time we were so cold 
that we stopped trying to get out. We could not move 
hand or foot, and the Michigan man swore that he 
could not hold on any longer. I looked down the river 
and saw the headlight of a boat coming, and encour- 
aged my comrade to hold on by saying it would prob- 
ably take us in. This was about one hour before day- 



240 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

light. We became unconscious and did not remember 
when we were picked up. We came to about nine 
o'clock that day. 

My present occupation is farming. Postoffice address, 
Lebanon, Boone county, Ind. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 



241 




CEORCE B. McCORD. 

T WAS born in Erie county, Ohio, April 8, 1844. 
My childhood days were spent in Erie and San- 
dusky counties, Ohio. I attended school in Bellevue, 
Clyde and Fremont, Ohio, and after the war in 
Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa. Enlisted in 
the service of the United States at Sandusky county, 
Ohio, as a private in Company G, 111th Regiment Ohio 
Volunteer Infantry, in "August, 1862, and mustered 
into service at Camp Toledo by Capt. Howard, United 
States Army. Received the appointment of orderly ser- 
geant, and afterwards promoted to first lieutenant and 
placed in command of Company F, 
31 



242 LOSS OF THE SULTAKA. 

Passed through many spirited and exciting battles 
and experienced many long and fatiguing marches 
through Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia and Ala- 
bama. Was in the siege of Knoxville and battles in 
that vicinity, Atlanta campaign and battles along the 
line. I was captured at Cedar Bluff, Ala., in October, 
1864, made my escape and was hunted down by blood 
hounds and returned to the prison at Oahaba. Ala. 
From there was sent to Andersonville, Ga. After 
remaining there about six months was taken to Vicks- 
burg, Miss., where we were comfortably clothed and 
properly fed. We remained there about thirty days 
and then boarded the ill-fated steamer " Sultana." 
Everything moved along quietly and pleasantly until 
we passed Memphis, Tenn. 

I was quietly sleeping on a cot in the cabin at the 
time of the explosion. Was wounded, and today carry 
scars caused thereby. Some of my companions who 
were sleeping near me were instantly killed. I jumped 
into the water. First swimming back and taking hold 
of the side wheel I held on to it long enough to remove 
some of my clothing so that I could swim easier. I 
then struck out with a determination to save my life, 
and was only out of reach when that immense wheel 
that I had been holding to fell over into the water, 
taking with it quite a number of persons to their 
watery grave. After swimming some distance and 
making several hair-breadth escapes from drowning 
men and horses I came across a stage plank floating as 
a life preserver for ten or more persons, one of whom 
was an engineer of said boat and who appeared to have 
control of the plank. An invitation from the engineer 



LOSS OF THE SULTAN^A. 243 

to catch on was quickly accepted and I peacefully 
floated along with them. We remained in the water 
until after daylight when we were picked up by the 
steamer " Jennie Lind ' and were landed in safety at 
Memphis, Tenn. One man was lost from the plank 
but ten lives were saved by it. Their names I am 
unable to give. Oapt. Taggart and myself, by permis- 
sion of Gen. Washburn, boarded the next steamer for 
Cairo, 111., and from there by rail to Indianapolis, 
thence to Columbus, Ohio, where, a few weeks later, we 
were honorably discharged from the service. After 
visiting friends and relations in different parts of Ohio 
I went to Iowa, being at one time sheriff of Marshall 
county. Have had the usual experience of a western 
sheriff of shooting and being shot. Many men are 
now languishing within the walls of the penitentiary 
that surrendered only after a desperate struggle and, 
overpowered by me, were compelled to give in. Have 
been badly wounded and at one time my wounds were 
considered fatal, but have nearly recovered and am now 
in reasonably good health. 

I am at present employed in the bank of Hanford. 
My present postofQce address, Hanford, California. 



L. W, McCRORY. 

T WAS born in Wayne county, Ohio, November 5, 
■■^ 1835, and enlisted in the service of the United 
States at Portage, Ohio, June 9, 1862, in Company A, 
100th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Was cap- 
tured at Limestone Station, East Tenn., September 8, 



244 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

1863, and confined in rebel prisons at Lynchburg, 
Belle Isle, Libby and Andersonville, spending in all 
twenty-two months in those horrible dens — one year 
and seven days in Andersonville. 

With others I was placed on the steamer " Sultana." 
I took up my place on the cabin deck in the curve of 
the stair banister. According to the best of my calcu- 
lation the boat must have blown up about one o'clock 
in the morning. The night was very dark and cloudy. 
When the boiler burst it tore its way up through the 
hurricane deck, which came crashing down, and in all 
probability would have crushed me had it not been for 
the stair banister which held it up and saved me. I 
soon crawled out of that and worked my way out on 
the small gang plank which was tackled up to what I 
think they called the gin pole. I took care to bring 
my valise and pocket-book along with me. The former 
contained a good suit of citizen's clothes, and the lat- 
ter over a hundred dollars. I remained upon the plank 
until driven off by the fire. While here I saw the big 
gang plank shoved olf. According to my remembrance 
this plank was about forty feet long and six feet 
wide and was heavily iron bound. I believe it was the 
cause of the death of at least 300 of the boys, for they 
were just as thick as they could cling around it and I 
never heard of one that was saved by it. 

When the fire finally drove me to the water, fearful 
lest I should need one hand, I put my pocket book, 
which was an old fashioned iron bound one between 
my teeth and hung on to my valise with one hand. It 
seemed to me that I never would come to the surface 
again for I had jumped down at least eighteen feet to 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 245 

reach the water, and to add to my discomfort my 
pocketbook kept my mouth partially open so that I 
took in some water, but still I managed to get along 
pretty well and as the boys say '^ did not lose my 
head." Comrade John Corn well of my company and 
regiment and myself swsm together, but he was easily 
discouraged. After awhile he called out to me that he 
could hold out no longer, but I cheered him up, urging 
him to try a little longer, telling him that I knew he 
was just as able to get out as I and that I was not 
going to give up. He tried awhile longer and then 
cried out again that it was no use, he must sink. I 
urged him to hold on, but after we had gone about 
two miles he called a third time and sank immedi- 
ately, and I saw him no more. This startled me a 
little, I had hung on to my valise all this time, chang- 
ing it from one hand to the other as either arm grew 
tired, but when Comrade Cornwell went down I threw 
the valise away but hung to my pocket book which, 
all this time, after I came up from my dive, I had 
gripped in my right hand with my little finger and 
and the one next to it. 

Now what seems strange to me is that in a very 
short time after throwing away my valise both arms 
became entirely helpless and I was obliged to turn 
over on my back and float in order to rest them. After 
floating awhile I swam a short distance when my 
arms gave out again, and I was forced to float once 
more but soon was able to swim again ; I then experi- 
enced no more trouble with my arms. I soon came in 
contact with a log upon which I crawled, and where I 
remained until about nine o'clock the next day, when 



246 LOSS OF THE SULTAl^A. 

I was taken off by the steamer "Pocahontas." While 
upon this log I saw a man reach an island who was 
pulled out by two of his comrades. I do not believe 
there was a particle of skin upon his entire body. He 
had been badly scalded and it had all come off. His 
comrades were doing their best to keep the buffalo 
gnats off him. What ever became of the poor fellow 
I never knew, but presume that he died in a short time. 

About the first man I came across on the " Pocahon- 
tas" was a big darkey who was dishing out hot sling 
unsparingly to the boys. I took a big drink but it 
was not enough, so I went up to the bar of the boat 
and called for brandy. The bartender set down a 
bottle and a small glass, but I called for a large one. 
He then set down a big beer tumbler. I filled thia 
brimming full and drank it, then offered to pay for it, 
but he refused to take pay, saying " it is free to * Sul- 
tana* survivors." I told him that when he disposed 
of it by wholesale he ought to charge something. I 
was taken to the Soldiers' Home and soon sent north 
on the steamer " Silver Spray.'' 

At the time of my capture I had one bullet put 
through my canteen, three through my haversack, and 
my clothes were literally filled full of holes, but I did 
not get even a scratch of the skin. On the trip from 
Andersonville, Ga., to Columbus, Ohio, I was wrecked 
six times on the cars and once on a steamboat, but was 
not injured a particle except a slightly sprained ankle 
received by jumping from the top of a box car about 
thirty feet down an embankment while the train was 
at full speed, the train breaking in two, part of it going 



LOSS OF THE SULTAITA. 247 

down the embankment one way while I went down the 
other way. 

My present occupation is farming, and my postoffice 
address Mungen, Ohio. 



WM. A. McFARLAND. 

T ENLISTED during the first call for volunteers in 
^ 1861, in Company A, 42nd Indiana Infantry, at 
the age of 16 years. My first duty was to act in the 
capacity of "marker" boy, but had not been out three 
months when I was carrying a gun with the other 
soldiers. I saw constant service until the 20th day of 
September 1863, when I was captured by Longstreet's 
command, at the battle of Chickamauga, in the second 
day's fight of that battle. We were skirmishing and 
were cut off from our command some time before we 
knew it. Our captors took us to Libby prison, where 
we were kept for four months. Our rations at first 
consisted of about half of an ordinary loaf of bread 
and a small piece of beef, each, for a day's ration, but 
the meat soon disappeared and we were left with noth- 
ing but the bread. I was taken with about 12,000 
other prisoners from Libby to the Danville, Va., 
prison, where we were kept about three months and 
then taken to the famous Andersonville prison, where we 
remained for eleven months more, to suffer indescrib- 
able horrors. The cover we had overhead was the blue 
canopy of heaven, while we were surrounded on the 
four sides by a high wall and a strong armed guard. 
When sleeping we were obliged to huddle together to 



248 tiOss OF 1:he sultana. 

keep warm in the winter. Our food was of the very 
poorest kind, consisting principally of corn meal. We 
were allowed to cook any articles we might buy, but 
were made to buy the wood to do the cooking with. 
One Irish potato would bring from ?5 cents to $1.25 — 
a tablespoonful of coarse salt 20 to 40 cents and a 
handful of wood 25 cents, and in good United States 
money, too. Some of the prisoners had money and 
often bought such articles, but if they got much at a 
time they would be raided by their comrades. 

After the war had come to a close the federal pris- 
oners were taken from Andersonville and other prisons 
by the rebels, under a flag of truce, to Big Black river, 
twelve miles in the rear of Vicksburg, and turned 
over to the federal forces, after which we marched 
into Vicksburg. The government had chartered the 
steamer " Sultana" to convey 400 prisoners north. The 
"Sultana'' was a packet plying between New Orleans 
and St. Louis, and was chartered on (or about) April 
23, 1865. 

The boat was loaded with 2,300 Union prisoners 
who were to be taken north to ** Camp Chase," Ohio. 
Before the boat had cleared the landing at Memphis a 
number of the boys made their escape and went up 
town and got whiskey. They were in no fit state to 
drink it — being in such a wretched condition from the 
treatment in the prisons— and a guard was sent out to 
bring them back. The last to put in an appearance 
was a soldier hailing from Tennessee. He was a thin 
seven-footer, and he came down to the boat, shouting 
and cursing, at the point of bayonets, so drunk he 



LOSS Of I^Hi) StJLl^AKA. 249 

could hardly walk. He was brought up to the hurri- 
cane deck, where he caused considerable disturbance. 

I was quite young at that time, and it pleased me 
very much to tease this fellow. He tried to get at me, 
but the men were so thick he had to run over a num- 
ber in trying to get to me, and received a number of 
hard licks for his trouble. When the '* Sultana " was 
chartered there were several families on board who 
were on their way from Louisiana to the north and 
they were permitted to retain their state rooms. 

After we left Memphis it began raining and con- 
tinued to do so all that night. When eight miles 
above Memphis, between two and three o'clock in the 
morning, the boilers of the boat exploded. I seemed 
to be dreaming and could hear some one saying, *' there 
isn't any skin left on their bodies.'' I awoke with a 
start and the next moment the boat was on fire and all 
was as light as day. The wildest confusion followed. 
Some sprang into the river at once, others were killed, 
and I could hear the groans of the dying above the 
roar of the flames. As before stated, I was on the hur- 
ricane deck, clear aft. This part of the boat was 
jammed with men. I saw the pilot house and hun- 
dreds of them sink through the roof into the flames, 
at which juncture I sprang overboard into the river. 
As I came to the surface of the water I saw a woman 
rush out of a state room in her night clothes with a 
little child in her arms. In a moment she had fast- 
ened a life preserver about its waist and then threw it 
overboard. The preserver had evidently been fastened 
on too low, for when the little one hit the water it 
turned wrong end up. The mother rushed into the 



260 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

state room an instant and was then out and sprang into 
the water and grabbed the child — all of which occurred 
in the space of a couple of minutes. 

The next thing that occupied my attention was 
seeing the seven-foot Tennesseean, whom I had been 
teasing on the trip, close at my side. '' A guilty con- 
science needs no accuser," and I supposed he would 
drown me if he caught me. I began swimming away 
from him. I swam seven miles down the river and 
into a drift, where I caught onto a log and awaited 
assistance. As day dawned I found that hundreds had 
followed my example, and although it was a serious 
situation I could not help laughing at the comical 
appearance that all made. Imagine my surprise when 
I observed that woman, whom I had witnessed plunge 
into the river after her baby, sitting a-straddle of a 
log about twenty feet in front of me with the little one 
before her. We were both picked up by a yawl sent 
out by the steamer *' Silver Spray.'' The next person 
the yawl approached was my long Tennessee friend, 
who was comfortably seated on a log. He asked how 
far it was to Memphis, and when told only a mile, he 
said to the crew, ''Go to hell with your boat; if you 
couldn't come to help me before now you had better 
have stayed awa^?," and with that he slid from his log 
and began swimming down the river. 

When the survivors arrived at Memphis that morn- 
ing all the hacks and omnibusses in the city were at 
the wharf to convey us to the Overton Hospital — now 
the Overton Hotel. There were enough conveyances 
for all and none were compelled to walk. The seven - 
foot Tennesseean had arrived at the landing by the 



LOSS OF THE StTLtAKA. ^51 

time the " Silver Spray " did, but it was found that he 
was still under the influence of liquor, after all the 
excitement of the night, and when he began to get 
into the conveyance he refused to ride. They tried to 
force him into a hack, but in the scuffle two or three 
soldiers were knocked down. A guard was detailed to 
march him through the streets to the hospital. On 
the way up we passed through a street inhabited 
mostly by Jews, who kept second-hand clothing estab- 
lishments, etc., and as the hack in which I was riding 
was slowly passing along the street I could see that 
long Tennesseean pulling off boots, shoes, hats, caps 
and other articles from the signs hanging in front, 
and by the time he reached the hospital he had about 
a dozen Jews at his heels clamoring for their wares. 
*^Dot ish my goat," said one, and "dose vas my 
shoes," said another, while a third would yell, ''gif 
me pack my bants." The Tennesseean turned, and, 
glaring at the crowd, threw the lot at his feet, saying, 
"There, help yourselves," and as they rushed forward 
and stooped over the pile he began to knock them 
right and left. 

It was afterwards learned that out of 2,300 prisoners 
on the "Sultana" 1,500 were either blown to pieces 
or drowned. The boat was totally destroyed. At the 
place where the wreck occurred the river was miles 
wide, making escape almost impossible. 

After being at the hospital a few days, and not being 
injured, I made my escape, determining to reach home 
as soon as possible. The first boat that came along 
was the "St. Patrick," a handsome steamer plying 
between Cincinnati and Memphis. Like a burnt child 



252 LOSS OP THE SULTANA. 

dreading the fire, I dreaded getting on a steamboat for 
fear of another explosion. Adopting what I supposed 
was the safest plan, I crawled into the yawl hanging 
over the stern of the boat (as all sidewheel packets 
have) and never left my quarters until I arrived at the 
wharf at Evansville. It rained most all the way up, 
but I stuck it through. Every time the boat would 
escape steam or blow the whistle I prepared to jump, 
supposing an explosion was about to take place. 



EPENETUS w. Mcintosh. 

(Late private of Company E and A, J4tli Illinois Infantry.) 

T EMBARKED on the steamer *' Henry Aims" at 
-^ Vicksburg, with about 2,100 soldiers on board 
returning from rebel prisons. I remained on said 
steamer until we arrived at Memphis, where we 
landed. I, supposing she would remain some time, 
went into town to look around and buy some articles I 
needed, and while gone she moved off and left me. 
Along in the evening the steamer ''Sultana" landed 
loaded with another lot of prisoners, so I embarked 
intending to go to Benton Barracks and join the com- 
rades I had left on the "Henry Aims." 

When some miles from the city (I cannot state the 
exact distance) she blew up, and I was sent whirling 
into the water, which T reached without any trouble 
from the steam, although many were scalded to death 
before reaching it. As I struck the water I heard 
groans and screams of agony on every side. 0, the 
scenel It is impossible to describe. I knew that im- 



LOSS OF THE SULTAl^A. 253 

mediate action was necessary. I decided to keep back 
from the crowd, but found it was not an easy matter, 
as the drowning were making for any who could swim, 
and catching at a straw. It was hard work to keep 
clear and save one's own life. I made for the shore, 
but it looked so far away in the mist of night that my 
courage almost failed me. 

After eight or ten hours I touched sand on the 
Arkansas shore. My strength was so near gone that I 
even then came near having a watery grave. It was 
with much difficulty and suffering that I was enabled 
to walk or crawl onto dry land where a colored man 
saw me and came to my assistance. I needed such 
assistance very much as I was destitute of clothing, 
having stripped myself as I swam along to lighten the 
load. In twenty minutes after reaching land I was 
bloated so much that I could scarcely see, and believe 
that if I had not been ca.red for at once I would have 
died. I remained there until the next day, when a 
boat came across the river picking up the boys and 
they took me to Memphis, Overton Hospital, where 
I remained two days. I was then put on a boat called 
the *^Belle of Memphis'' and taken to Benton Barracks 
and remained there until I got a furlough. 

During my prison life I suffered agonies untold. 
Tongue cannot tell it all, but this awful struggle for 
life in the waters was above all else I ever endured. 
Owing to the necessity of constant motion, without 
rest to any part of the body, being reduced to a mere 
skeleton through being confined in rebel prisons was 
in my favor, as I could never have survived that awful 
disaster had I weighed as much as I did before my 



254 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

prison experience. My weight now was eighty pounds. 

I was captured at Ackworth, Ga., about the 4th of 
October, 1864, and exchanged at Vicksburg, April 15, 
1865. Was in Andersonville most of the time. When 
I was captured I weighed 175 pounds. I will never go 
back on the old flag. Although somewhat palsied and 
greatly maimed I can give three hearty cheers for the 
red, white and blue, and set a rebel back if he comes 
to the front almost as quickly as I could when in 
possession of all my powers. 

Postoftice address, Decatur, 111. 



DANIEL McLEOD. 

T WAS a member of Company F, 18th Regiment llli- 
^ nois Volunteer Infantry, and at the battle of Pitts- 
burgh Landing, April 6, 1862, was shot in the right 
knee with round musket ball, which caused a com- 
pound fracture of the knee joint. This wound was 
examined on the battle ground by Asst. Surg. Ormsby 
of the 18th regiment (afterwards surgeon of the 45th 
Illinois), who stated that the leg would have to be cut 
off above the knee, but that he was too busy at that 
time to attend to it. I have the affidavits of two 
comrades who heard Dr. Ormsby make the assertion. 
I was taken from the battle-field on the steamer ^^ War 
Eagle " to Cincinnati, Ohio, and was put in the Fourth 
Street Hospital, and there treated by Dr. F. Schmidt, 
who cut the ball out of the knee joint and removed 
part of the fractured bones. Drs. Norton and J. B. 
Smith were consulted in the case by Dr. Schmidt. Dr. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 255 

Norton said that the only way to treat such a case 
was to cut the boy's leg off, that in case he did recover 
what end would it serve as the limb would be of no 
use. From the Fourth Street Hospital I was removed 
to the Washington Park Hospital. While I was there 
I was examined by the medical purveyor of the depart- 
ment, Dr. Carpenter, in the presence of Drs. J. B. 
Smith and Norton. Dr. Norton then explained the 
nature and character of the wound and also stated 
what he, Norton, had recommended. Dr. Carpenter 
said " that was the course that should be taken in cases 
of a like character always." 

On June 7, 1863, I was removed to ^' Camp Den- 
nison,'' Ohio; August 7, to Quincy, 111., receiving my 
final United States discharge from there in June, 1864. 
I was then examined by the United States Pension 
Surgeon at Springfield, 111., and granted $8 per month 
pension — the full pension at that time for entire dis- 
ability. I was never able to make any use of that 
leg. 

I was a passenger on the steamer *' Sultana," en 
route from New Orleans to St. Louis. When the 
steamer reached Vicksburg one of the boilers was leak- 
ing and was patched by Klien's foundry men before 
the soldiers were put on board. There was no neces- 
sity of loading the '' Sultana '' so heavily, as the steam- 
ers *' Pauline Carroll'' and ^' Lady Gay" were at the 
landing coming up light, but the clerk and captain of 
the "Sultana" were part owners of the boat, and I 
understood at the time that they put up money to get 
the transportation of the soldiers, which the officers of 
Ithe other boats, having no interest, would not do. 



256 LOSS OF THE SULTAKA. 

The hold of the ''Sultana" was full of sugar, and 
nearly every state room was taken in the cabin, besides 
a number of deck passengers. According to my 
remembrance there were taken on at Vicksburg 1,940 
enlisted men, 40 officers, and a company of the 54th 
Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, as guards. The 
night of the explosion, being tired from the long trip, 
I sat up reading at a table in the center of the cabin, 
and when the explosion took place I was blown over 
the table being, as it were, on the outer edge of the 
crater. All nearer the bow went up and down in the 
chasm made by the explosion. Both my legs were 
broken at the ankle. When the boat began to burn, 
which it did at once, every one that was able rushed 
to the guards. While I was dragging myself out the 
captain of the 54th Ohio came and pulled me out to 
the guards. I at once climbed down on the hog chains 
to where they had been broken off and let myself drop 
into the water, which was full of the wreck and men 
trying to escape, but not so many as there were shortly 
afterward when the flames forced them to take to the 
water. I had been brought up near the water and was 
a good swimmer, so I floated down the river about two 
miles and lodged in the brush on Cheek's Island, 
above Memphis. In the morning I was picked up and 
taken to Memphis and placed in Adam's Hospital in 
charge of Surgeon J. M. Studley who, after examining 
my fractures, told me that it was no use trying to save 
my right leg as it was in such a condition from the 
previous wound that it would be practically impossible 
to save it and that he would have to cut it off above 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 257 

the old wound. This he did and sefc the broken bones 
of the other leg, and soon both were healed. 

My present postoffice address is 818 Market street, 
St. Louis, Mo. 



L. C. MORGAN. 

T WAS born in Perry county, Ohio, September 14, 
^ 1837, and enlisted in the service of the United 
States at Findlay, Ohio, September 19, 1861, in Com- 
pany D, 121st Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry. I. 
with others, was captured near Kingston, Ga., and 
taken to Cahaba, Ala. Our rations consisted of a pint 
of corn meal and five ounces of beef daily, and in 
addition to this we would get a few beans or negro 
peas — about two or three spoonsful to the man. We 
were divided into companies of 100 men each, and one 
man appointed as orderly sergeant for each company 
to draw and divide rations. We planned a way of 
escape, but failed in doing so. The guards tried to 
persuade us to tell who the leaders of the conspiracy 
were, but we refused to do so. They then read an 
order that all rations would be stopped unless we did, 
but still we refused. The most of us made up our 
minds that we would rather starve than betray our 
comrades. After going through various forms of pun- 
ishment some one finally told, and the conspirators 
were severely punished. After that things moved 
along quietly, nothing of importance happening, only 
the usual tunneling and getting caught at it. Finally 
the time came for us to be exchanged, and after sign- 
33 



258 LOSS OP THE SULTANA. 

ing a parole of honor, pledging the ''rebs" that we 
would not try to escape, we took a boat and went to 
Selma, Ala., where we remained over night. In the 
morning we walked about two miles to take the train, 
one of the men dying on the way from overeating the 
night before. We got along all right until we reached 
Jackson, Miss. Here we went into camp and baked 
enough corn bread to last us through to Vicksburg. 
We reached Black Eiver, where we remained over 
night. The next morning we were exchanged and 
marched across the river into Grod's country once more. 
To say that we were glad would be putting it in a very 
mild form. 

We remained in camp for about six weeks and at 
last the time came for us to go north, so we marched 
to Vicksburg — a distance of about four miles — and were 
put on board the steamer "Sultana." When about 
half of us were on board the captain of the boat stopped 
us and said that he had enough, for he did not con- 
sider the boat safe enough to take so many as he had 
just had the boiler patched a few days before. The 
quartermaster, however, who had charge of us, swore 
that he was loading the boat and would put as many 
men on as he pleased. We were so crowded that it 
was difficult to find a place to lie down to sleep. The 
boiler, cabin and hurricane decks were all full. There 
were 2,000 soldiers and 200 passengers, besides some 
700 hogsheads of sugar and I think about 30 or 40 
mules and other freight. When we reached Memphis 
we unloaded sugar and took on coal. I think it was 
about one or two o'clock a. m. when we started up the 



LOSS OF THE SULTA^-A. 259 

river a^ain, and when about seven miles above Memphis 
the boiler exploded. 

I was sleeping in front of the smoke stacks on the 
cabin deck. I got up and looked around. It would 
be impossible for me to describe the scene. My first 
thought was to get some buckets and put the fire out, 
but not seeing any and being afraid to venture over the 
wreck I jumped off and swam to the stern of the boat, 
then got on again, but could not find any. Then some 
one asked me to help throw off the dead men, for it 
looked hard to see them burn. We threw off five or six. 
One poor fellow was pinned down by the wreck and 
begged some one to help him out. I tried to but the 
timbers were so heavy that I could not get him loose 
and so I had to let him burn to death. A man by the 
name of Henry Spaffar, who belonged to the 102d 
Kegiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, came to me and 
said, *' Morgan, what am I going to do, I cannot 
swim ? " I told him to get a plank, but he said he 
could not find any. I found a good one, threw it into 
the water and made him jump in after it. I then 
thought it time to get o : myself as the fire was getting 
pretty hot. I watched my chance and finally started. 
Being a good swimmer I did not take anything to help 
me along with. My only fear was that some one would 
get hold of me and pull me down and I would drown. 
I must have swam very rapidly for I passed a number 
of fellows in the water. I swam along till I got close 
to the timber, but it was right at a bend in the river 
and the current was so strong that before I could reach 
it I was carried below it into the river again. 

I went along for awhile seeing no one, but after a 



260 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

short time some one called out, " Hello, Morgan, is 
that you?" I replied, "yes." It was Spaffar who 
hailed me. I was nearly used up, for my legs were 
badly cramped. Spaffar floated a board to me and 
that helped me along. We swam down the river to- 
gether and finally landed on some drift wood. Soon 
after sunrise we were picked up by the steamer 
"Rocket." The barkeeper on the boat sent a boy 
around with a pitcher full of whiskey and we each 
had a large glassful. When we reached Memphis the 
women of the Christian Commission gave us some 
shirts and drawers and took us to a place called a 
soldier's home, but they had no blankets for us to 
sleep on. After we had something to eat I started to 
go through the city bare headed and bare footed, and 
while passing a store owned by a Jew the proprietor 
came out and asked me if I had been on the boat. I 
answered in the affirmative and he gave me a hat, one 
of the clerks giving me a pair of shoes. A little 
further up the street I met an artilleryman and he 
said if I would come with him to his quarters he would 
give me a pair of pants. I accompanied him, and 
while there another artillery boy gave me a blouse. 
I got my supper with them and then went to a hospital 
where I was provided with a cot to sleep upon. In the 
morning as I was going down the street I saw a sign 
on a building and it said " Soldier's Lodge." That 
was kept by the Christian Commission and the '* Sol- 
dier's Home " was kept by the Sanitary Commission. I 
went in and they said that I could stay. I was there 
for five or six days, when we took a boat for Cairo, 
111. From there we took the cars and went to Mat- 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 261 

toon, thence via Indianapolis, Ind., to Columbus, Ohio, 
remaining there for six weeks. We then received our 
discharge and went home, I think about the last of 
May or first of June. 
Post-oflace address, Findlay, Ohio. 



A. J. MOURNING. 

T WAS a member of company D, 11th Regiment 
Illinois Cavalry, and was stationed at Memphis at 
the time the explosion took place on the morning of 
the 27th of A-pril, 1865. A detail of us was sent to 
the wharf very early to unload hay. We were immedi- 
ately put into a yawl and succeeded in rescuing a num- 
ber of the poor fellows from the "Sultana." We 
worked at it till about two o'clock in the afternoon. 
My postoffice address is Toledo, Ohio. 



A. NIHART. 

I WAS born in Hocking county, Ohio, June 11, 1842, 
and enlisted in the service of the United States at 
Logan, Hocking county, Ohio, June, 1862, in com- 
pany G, 90th Regiment Ohio Infantry. Was captured 
at Spring Hills, Tenn., November, 1864, and confined 
in the Andersonville, Ga., prison. 
Occupation, farming. Postoffice, Bolivar, Mo. 



262 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 



C. M. NISLEY. 



T WAS born in Harrisburgh, Pa., on the 19th of May, 
^ 1838. 

Enlisted in Company D of the 40th Regiment Indi- 
ana Infantry, on the 29th of October, 1861, at LaFay 
ette, Ind., and took part in all the engagements that 
the regiment participated in until taken prisoner at 
the battle of Franklin, Term., on the 30th of Novem- 
ber, 1864. I was captured about eight o'clock in the 
evening, with 1,900 others, and hurried to Columbia, 
Tenu., and held there until a few days before the 
second battle of Nashville under "Pap" Thomas, 
when we were removed to Meridian, Miss., and from 
thence to Cahaba, Ala., where we were confined in a 
prison called ''Castle Morgan." This place was on 
the Alabama river, twenty-seven miles from Selma, and 
where the Cahaba river empties into the Alabama. 
We were kept here until in the spring of 1865, when 
the river arose till the water was from eighteen inches 
to three feet deep in our prison, and we were forced to 
stand in the water as we could not lie down for three 
days. We were then put upon the steamer " Henry J. 
King" and taken down the river to' the Tombigbee, 
and up that river to Gainesville, Ala., then back by way 
of Meridian, Miss., to Jackson, and from there to the 
Big Black river, and then were taken to the neutral 
camp near Vicksburg, Miss., where we rested and 
cleaned up for about ten days. We were next taken 
over to Vicksburg, and went on board the steamer 
''Sultana." Starting up the river we arrived at 
Memphis, Tenn., on the evening of the 26th of April, 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 263 

1865. The steamer crossed the river to the coal barges 
and took on a supply of coal and, shortly after mid- 
night or virtually on the morning of the 27th of April, 
started up the river again and had run about seven 
miles when the explosion took place. 

At the time of the explosion I was lying on the fore- 
part of the passenger deck. The smoke-stack fell 
through the hurricane deck, instantly killing John 
Howard of Company H, 40th Indiana Infantry, and 
pinned me fast to the deck, but after a few moments 
of struggling I succeeded in extricating myself. I then 
started to help put out the fire, but I fell through the 
decks hurting my back seriously besides getting badly 
burned and scalded. I immediately set about helping 
to extricate those who were caught fast by pieces of 
the boat. After this in company with Oapt. Mason, 
of the *'Sultana," I threw over broken pieces of the boat 
and other materials for those already in the water, 
but after a little time the fire became so hot that I was 
obliged to take to the water. A great many had sunk 
to rise no more, and there were but few floating and 
swimming about that would be liable to drag me down. 
Oapt. Mason was the last man I talked with while on 
board the boat, and he was still on the boat when I 
left. I managed to get hold of a piece of studding 
about ten feet long, and with its assistance swam and 
floated about five miles down the river, when I caught 
on to a small cotton-wood tree on the Arkansas shore 
and hung there till about ten o'clock when I was 
picked up by the steamer, " Bostonia" and taken to 
a hospital at Memphis where I remained a few days. 
Was then sent to Cairo, and thence to Indianapolis. 



264 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

Here I received a ten days' furlough to go to my home, 
La Fayette. When this expired, I, having received a 
commission as first lieutenant, started to join my regi- 
ment, which was at Lavaca, Texas, but was taken with 
typhoid fever and came near dying, so at last took my 
discharge and returned to my home hoping to hear the 
sound of war no more. 

I am now over fifty years of age, but should my 
country ever need my services I am as ready and 
willing as before to give them. 

Capt. Hazellaige, of Company K, 40th Indiana 
Infantry, was quartermaster of the troops on the boat 
and I was his assistant, helping to issue the rations. 
As near as I can remember there were 1,966 enlisted 
men and 36 commissioned officers on board the boat. 
I was afterward a witness before the court of 
inquiry that investigated the cause of the explosion, 
and I will say now, as I did then, that in my opinion 
the boilers were defective, the boat over-loaded, and 
the pumps not working properly which led to the 
explosion. I do not believe in the torpedo story. It 
does not look reasonable to me. 

My present post office address is 36 Elizabeth street, 
La Fayette, Ind. My occupation is traveling sales- 
man, but for the past year have not been able to do 
much. 



JOHN W. NORCUTT. 



T WAS born in Litchfield, Hillsdale county, Mich., 

on the 1st day of July, 1838, and enlisted at Allen, 

Mich., December 17, 1863, in company D, 18th Kegi- 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 



265 



ment Michigan Infantry. I was captured at Athens, 
Ala., September 22, 1864, and confined in the rebel 
prison at Cahaba, Ala. 

With others of my regiment I was on board the ill- 
fated steamer " Sultana," and when the boat took fire 
I sprang into the river. I succeeded in securing two 
pieces of cabin flooring, and placing one of these under 
each arm I floated down the river till I came to an 
island that was overflowed. Here I caught hold of 
some small trees and held on till rescued by a steamer 
and taken to Memphis. I think I was in the water 
about four hours. I was in the hospital after this 
fourteen days before I could stand alone. 

My present occupation is mail carrier, and my post- 
office address, Campbell, Mich. 



ALBERT NORRIS. 

T WAS born in Muskingum, 
county, Ohio, on the 17th 
of March, 1842. Enlisted in 
the service of the United States 
at Newark, Ohio, on the 18th of 
February, 1864, in Company A, 
76 bh Ohio Volunteer Infantry 
as a private. Was taken pris- 
oner at Little River, Ga. , on 
rv the 26th of October, 1864, by 

the 5l8t Alabama Regiment (confederate), while on 
detail made by the Colonel to forage. Was taken to 
Cahaba, Ala., where I remained until I was paroled 




266 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

out on the 18th of March, 1865, and sent to Vicksburg, 
Miss., and remained in camp at Big Black river until 
the 24th of April, when I took passage on the cabin 
deck of the steamer ^' Sultana *' for Cairo, 111. 

At half past one on the morning of the 27th of April, 
1865, I was lying asleep on the cabin deck of the boat, 
just in front and nearly over the furnace, when one of 
her boilers exploded, blowing the center part of the 
boat into the river. I fell to the boiler deck upon the 
hot irons of the furnace, burning my left arm and 
shoulder to a crisp. The men on the hurricane deck 
fell upon me, and it was some time before I became 
conscious of my surroundings. After the men got off 
me, getting my right arm loose, I removed the 
boards that held me down and got on my feet. 

Securing a cracker barrel that had one head in, I 
jumped over the high railing, around the center of 
the boat, into the deep water. Comrade Stone of 
Newark, Ohio, got a coal box and threw it and the 
barrel into the river. I caught both of them and gave 
him the box and kept the barrel for my own use. We 
started out for the Tennessee shore and he floated down 
stream about seven miles below where the explosion 
took place, or to Memphis, Tenn., where he was picked 
up. My feet became entangled in my under-clothing, 
and in trying to loosen them I came near drowning. 
I swam about a mile when I saw the steamer '* Bos- 
tonia" anchoring within two hundred yards above the 
burning wreck. I swam close to her, when three men 
in a small boat took me in and carried me to the res- 
cuing steamer. This boat carried one hundred of us 
to Memphis, Tenn. I remained in the Washington 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 267 

and Gayoso hospitals under the physician's care for 
three weeks when Dr. Shipley, of Nashport, and my 
brother, Wm, A. Norris, came to Memphis for me. I 
returned home to Frazeysburgh, and then reported to 
"Camp Chase," Ohio, and was discharged from the 
service on the 30th of June, 1865. My recollections 
are that there were 2,200 on board the " Sultana," and 
1,600 were lost. I saw one man going down the river 
on a large slab hallooing : ** Here goes your schooner 
for Memphis." Some prayed, some swore and some 
sang. It was worse than any battle I was ever in. 

Since my discharge I have been agent and telegraph 
operator for the P. H. R. R. Co. sixteen years, and am 
now engaged in the mercantile business at Union Sta- 
tion, Ohio. 



JOSEPH B. NORRIS. 

T WAS born in Salem township, Tuscarawas county, 
^ Ohio, November 25, 1841, and enlisted in the service 
of the United States September 9, 1861, in Company 
C, 51st Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Was 
taken prisoner at Chickamauga, September 20, 1863, 
and confined in the Pemberton building at Richmond, 
Va., for two months, at Dansville, Va., six months, 
and Anderson ville, Ga., ten months. Was exchanged 
at Vicksburg, Miss., March 25, 1865, making in all 
eighteen months and five days a prisoner of war. 

On April 25th we received orders for all of the paroled 
prisoners belonging to the States of Ohio, Indiana, 
Michigan, and Kentucky to take the train to Ticks- 



268 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

burg, our camp being four miles in the rear of the 
city, as we were to take a steamer that evening to go 
north. We were placed on board the steamer '' Sul- 
tana." I think the list of prisoners numbered 1,964, 
with one company of the 58th Ohio and two pieces of 
artillery as guard, besides cabin passengers and boat's 
crew. 

We steamed out of Vicksburg between four and five 
o'clock p M, of the 24th, and reached Memphis a little 
before sundown of the 26th, where we tied up and 
unloaded quite a number of hogsheads of sugar. The 
*' Sultana " also took on coal at this point. I think it 
was about half past twelve or one o'clock in the morning 
of the 27th that the boat left Memphis. That was the 
last that I knew until after the explosion. I had gone 
to sleep, and was on the hurricane deck at the time. I 
did not hear the report, but was awakened by the cries 
of my comrades who were running to and fro. Some 
were screaming, some were praying, and others were 
shouting and telling the boys to keep cool. I tell you 
it was a hard place to keep cool, with the flames sweep- 
ing all around. I first went to the Arkansas f^de to 
jump overboard, but there were too many there iu the 
water for me. I then went to the Tennessee side and 
found the same trouble. I started for the boat's stern, 
tearing off my drawers and shirt as I went. Finding 
things no better there, I thought I would wait until 
the boat would float down from among the men who 
were drowning in the water. Just then a strong 
breeze drove the flames so close as to make it unpleas- 
ant, and thinking it about as easy to drown as to burn, 
I started for the bottom of the Mississippi. I did not 



LOSS OF THE SULTAKA. 269 

get quite there, but coming to the surface I started 
for shore. 

After swimming for a long time, and being almost 
chilled to death, I landed in the top of some brush, to 
which I held till daylight, when I saw a good sized 
sycamore log that had lodged in the brush about thirty 
feet from where I then was. I pulled myself from 
bush to bush, as I was past swimming, and my legs 
were entirely benumbed with cold. I reached the log 
after some fifteen or twenty minutes hard work and 
pulled myself upon it. All the time I was holding on 
to the brush in the water I could hear the boys that had 
got into trees, as it began to get daylight, crowing like 
roosters, and crying "here's your mule!" It was 
about seven o'clock before I was able to crow. I was 
picked up by the United States picket-boat " Pocahon- 
tas" about ten o'clock a. m. April 27, without a stitch 
of clothing on my back, and pretty well tired out as 
well as peppered by the bites of buffalo gnats. After 
donning a shirt (given to me by a couple of " Sanitary" 
ladies) and a pair of overalls from one of the firemen, and 
drinking a couple of glasses of something that did not 
look or taste altogether like spring water, I was ready 
for breakfast, which was on the kitchen table of the 
"Pocahontas." I had not eaten at a table for nearly four 
years and was rather awkward, but got there just the 
same. Postoffice address is Kandolph, Neb. 



270 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 



J. E. NORTON. 

T ENLISTED at Pontiac, Mich., in August 1862, 
■■^ as a sergeant in Company A, of the 5th Michigan 
Cavalry. I was captured the last time at Trevillian 
Station, Va., with 500 of our brigade (Custer) June 
11, 1864, and imprisoned in Libby ten days, Pember- 
ton building a few days and then shipped by cars to 
Andersonville, Ga., where I remained until removed 
to Millen prison in September following. Was in the 
latter prison but a short time when Kilpatrick, trying 
to capture us with a scouting detachment from Sher- 
man's army, drove us out and the rebels took us to 
Savannah, there put us on the Gulf road and run us 
down, finally, to Blackshear, thence to Thomasville, 
and from there across the country to Americus, Ga. 
Taking the road again we came back to Andersonville 
sometime in December, where we remained during the 
winter. Early in the spring of 1865 we were ordered 
to be sent to Vicksburg, where on arriving we went on 
board the steamer ''Sultana." We were placed on 
this steamer by that careless officer. Gen Dana, who 
had charge of shipping all the soldiers at that point. 
May he never be forgotten as a type of first class don't 

care for the boys who were returning to their long 

looked for home and loved ones. 

On the morning of the 2?th of April, 1865, I found 
myself waking from a stupor or unconsciousness, pro- 
duced by a blow which I received at the time of the 
explosion upon the head just back of the center part 
of the brain. I was pinned or held down by the tim- 
bers or materials of some sort and felt a smarting sen- 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 271 

sation on my face ; tried to raise my hand but was so 
pinned down that I could not. I struggled and finally 
loosened myself only to find I was in darkness. I did 
not apprehend at all what was the matter, nor was I in 
the least cognizant of my surroundings, for everything 
was all right when I went to sleep (just as we pushed 
off from the dock at Memphis a few hours before). 
My quarters upon the fated boat were in the center of 
the upper deck and ten feet in front of the smoke 
stack, the boilers being back of the smoke stack 
prevented my being thrown into the water. I 
remember distinctly of hearing a noise caused by the 
explosion, and can only describe the noise by measure- 
ment (being a mechanic I can do no other way). It 
appeared to be about one and one-half inch long, and 
then all was blank until I awoke one-half hour after- 
ward. Not a sound could I hear but the splashing of 
water. Could see nothing and was in a great wonder- 
ment of mind as to the trouble I felt I was surrounded 
by. Presently I heard voices on the end of the boat 
crying, " Put out that fire, put out that fire !" I look- 
ed and discovered a fire breaking out above the deck 
about the size of the crown of a hat. It grew rapidly 
and soon illuminated the awful scene. The thoughts 
that came rushing upon me were simply appalling 
and too terrible for my description. I looked for 
something that was loose on which I could float but 
could find nothing. I crawled down to the lower deck 
(the only one which was not broken up) and, as I was 
so doing, a hand reached up from below me and 
caught my ankles and I heard some one saying, '' Help 
me out.*' A timber prevented them from getting out 



272 LOSS OF THE SULTAIJA. 

and I tried to raise it but could not quite. A comrade 
came crawling along, bent upon reaching the lower 
deck, and helped me to raise the timber from off three 
or four men and thus saved them from being burned 
to death. 

When I reached the deck I found a box which I 
made use of in floating although I was a good swim- 
mer. Thinking that I must be in the water for a 
long time before relief might come, I remained on 
board the boat until the fire drove me off and then 
jumped into the water. While I was swimming away 
from the burning wreck a man attacked me and 
wanted my box. I moved the box sideways enough 
for him to miss his clutch upon it, but he caught me 
by the hip and we both went down under water 
farther than I ever went before or since. I finally 
came to the surface of the water but so weak from 
having taken water into my lungs that I could scarcely 
keep up, and if it had not been for the box I think I 
would have drowned. About fifteen feet away from 
me I saw a bale of hay with a soldier boy lying across 
it, which I made the greatest physical effort to 
reach. I finally made it and putting my arm upon one 
corner, and with the box under the other arm, I was 
soon able to disgorge some of the water from my 
lungs. As soon as I could speak I assured the soldier 
boy that I would not sink his bale of hay. He was 
piteously begging me not to as he could not swim. I 
told him to keep a look out and not let any one get 
on with us. I found by careful observation that it 
would support both of us with the use of my box 
under one arm. 



LOSS OF THE SULTA^-A. 273 

The water was cold and chilly and but for my care 
the boy would have fallen off and drowned. I kept 
him using his limbs so as to keep the blood in cir- 
culation and thus prevent chilling so much. We 
floated down the river opposite to Memphis where we 
were picked up by the steamer "Bostonia," which 
was on her trip to the wreck, and we were afterwards 
landed at Memphis. I remained about a month at 
Memphis and then came north to Columbus, Ohio, 
thence to Jackson, Mich, where I was discharged from 
the service in June, 1865. 

My present occupation is model and pattern making. 
Postoffice address 62 Duffield street, Detroit, Mich. 

35 



274 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA, 




WM. H. NORTON. 

T WAS born in Northampton township, Summit 
^ county, Ohio, February 17, 1841. I enlisted in 
the service of the United States in Northampton, the 
11th day of August, 1862, in Company C, 115th Ohio 
Volunteer Infantry. 

I am forty-five years of age (October 25, 1886) and 
my residence at. the present time is Hudson, Ohio. 
My occupation is farming. 

Was a corporal at the time of my discharge from 
the service, which discharge I received at '^Camp 
Chase," Ohio, May 25, 1865. I was captured at La 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 275 

Vergne, Tenn., December 6, 1864, by Gen. Forrest's 
command at the time of Hood's raid on Nashville, 
Tenn. We were started on a forced march to the 
Tennessee river. At a place near Florence, we boarded 
the cars for Meridian, Miss. I remained there in 
prison about ten weeks and was then sent to Cahaba, 
Ala., where I remained until the first of March, 1865. 
The river rose very high and the prison was overflowed 
(the water in the prison was two or three feet deep), 
and I was sent to Selma, from there to '' Camp Fisk," 
near Vicksburg, Miss. I went on board the steamer 
" Sultana " April 25, 1865. 

At the time of the explosion I was sleeping on the 
forward part of the upper deck and was awakened by 
the explosion and cries of the wounded. Men were 
rushing to and fro, trampling over each other in their 
endeavors to escape. All was confusion. Soon the 
flames came leaping up and I now realized that the 
boat was on fire. I stood for a few minutes and list- 
ened to that awful wail of hundreds of human beings 
burning alive in the cabin and under the fallen timbers. 
I tried to get down to the lower deck; found it 
impossible to go down by the stairway on account of 
the fire but, fortunately, discovered a rope, and by the 
aid of that landed on the lower deck. There the men 
were jumping into the river by the hundreds. The 
river was full of men struggling with each other and 
grasping at everything that offered any means of sup- 
port. The boat was fast burning up and the flames 
had reached within a few feet of me and I now knew 
that there was but one way of escape— the deep, dark 
waters of the Mississippi. I took off my shoes and 



276 LOSS OF THE SULTAIS'A. 

clothing, except under-clothing, and jumped over- 
board. 

As I arose to the surface several men from the boat 
jumped upon me and we all went down together. 
Others leaping on us forced us down until I despaired 
of ever reaching the surface again but, by a desper- 
ate struggle, I succeeded in getting out from under 
them and reached the surface. I tried to swim through 
the crowd of men but could not. One man caught 
hold of me but I managed to get away from him, 
and not knowing what to do or which way to go I in- 
stinctively turned toward the burning boat. Reaching 
that and swimming alongside I found the ring which 
is used in tying up the boat. I had no sooner caught 
hold of it than a drowning man clasped his arms 
around me in a death grip. I told him he must let go, 
but it was of no use ; he never said a word, but all the 
while I could feel his arms tightening around me. 
Hanging on to the ring with one hand I tried to free 
myself from him with the other but could not. The 
situation was becoming terrible. To let go the ring 
was death to both of us. The strain on my arm was 
such that I could not hold out but a few minutes longer. 
Another man now got hold of the ring and still another 
grasped him by the throat and a desperate struggle was 
going on between them. 

The wheel house had now burned loose and fell over 
with a crash. It seemed to me that the boat was going 
to pieces. With all the strength I had I made another 
effort to free myself from the drowning man and 
was successful and once more struck out into the river. 
This time I had no difficulty in getting through, as 



LOSS OF THE SULTAN"A. 277 

the men had become more scattered. A few rods 
ahead of me was a small box, ten by sixteen inches 
square, which I soon overtook and placing it under my 
arm I found it to be quite a help, but it would not 
support me. Looking off some distance in the dark, 
ness I saw a light and, supposing it must be a boat out 
picking up the men, I now jnade an effort to reach 
it, but it grew dimmer and dimmer and finally disap- 
peared altogether. (I think it must have been the deck 
hands with the yawl boat.) I turned in another 
direction hoping that I could reach the shore, but the 
darkness was so intense, except towards the burning 
boat, that no trace of the shore could be seen. 

Suffering with a cramp in my stomach, benumbed 
with the cold, it seemed as if I could go no farther, 
but if I stopped swimming I found myself sinking, 
and again would try to keep afloat. In this way I 
kept along. I could hear the cries of those that were 
burned and scalded screaming with pain at every 
breath, and men all along the river were calling for 
help. Away in the distance, floating down the river, 
was the burning boat with a few brave men fighting 
the fire with buckets of water. Looking to my left I 
thought I could see the trees through the darkness. 
This gave me new courage and I turned in that direc- 
tion and soon some brush struck me in the face. A 
little farther on I was washed up against a log which 
had caught in the young cotton wood trees. About 
nine o'clock in the morning of April 27, a man in a 
canoe rowed me over to the Arkansas shore. I had 
landed on an island which was overflowed with water. 
Was told by the man that had rescued me that I had 



278 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

landed between two or three miles below where the 
'« Sultana" exploded. 



STEWART OXLEY. 

T WAS born in Coshocton county, Ohio, on the 20th 
^ day of May 1842. Enlisted in the service of the 
United States, November 18, 1861, in Company I of 
the 51st Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, which was 
organized at **Camp Meigs," in Tuscarawas county, 
and was assigned to the Army of the Cumberland. 
Was taken prisoner near Dallas, Ga., May 26, 1864, and 
confined at Selma and Cahaba, Ala., and Meridian, 
Miss., until about the 10th of March, 1865, when we 
came into God's country at the Big Black river bridge, 
near Vicksburg, Miss. In dividing off into companies 
at Vicksburg, I was tented with some of the 50th 
Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry boys, and one, 
Albert Hunter, of the 10th Ohio Cavalry, and I were 
bunk-mates, and when we went aboard the steamer 
" Sultana" we took our places on the cabin stoop on 
the left or west side, just to the rear and next to the 
cabin door. One or the other of us was there all the 
time. I was sick at the time and was seldom away 
from our place of abode. On the afternoon of April 
26th we arrived at Memphis, Tenn. Just about the time 
we started from Memphis we spread our blankets and 
lay down to rest and sleep. I went to sleep very soon 
as I have no remembrance of anything after that until 
I was strangling in the water. I never felt or heard 
the explosion, or anything that transpired at the time 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 279 

of the wreck (which occurred about two o'clock on the 
morning of the 27th of April, about seven or eight 
miles above Memphis), farther than my striking on a 
piece of the wreck. In my struggle I got hold of 
the piece of wrecking and started on my lonely voyage 
of seven or eight miles with the current as a moving 
power. Soon after I became aware there was a 
man on the other end of my craft. Up to this time I 
could not imagine what had happened that I should be 
in the water. My companion told me that the boat 
was on fire. I did not remember anything after this 
until we came opposite to Memphis, and while passing 
near the gunboat anchored in the river, I think one or 
the other of us must have shouted and given the alarm. 
About four o'clock in the morning some of the boat's 
crew overtook us and we were taken out of the water. 
In all this time I did not suffer in mind or body nor 
was I sensible of my danger or surroundings. I don't 
think I made any effort to save myself at all. After I 
was taken into the boat (I don't remember as they 
picked up any more before we got to the gunboat or 
not, but think they did not), they started back for the 
gunboat. As we were put on to the deck the surgeon 
poured a glass of whiskey down each one and the men of 
the crew took off our wet clothing, cut down their ham- 
mocks for us to lie on, and did everything possible for 
our comfort. The gunboat soon got under way and 
after doing all that could be done they came to and 
landed us at Memphis. I was carried on a stretcher to 
the Overton Hospital where I remained four weeks, less 
one day. My ribs on one side were cracked and broken. 



280 LOSS OF THE SULTAl^A. 

my back was badly iDJured, and the right side of my 
face and head scalded. 

In the list of those saved I could never find the name 
of Hunter who was sleeping on the same blanket with 
me, and I never learned the name of the comrade that 
Tras on the piece of wreckage with me. 

Of my suffering and good nursing and kind treat- 
ment by the good Sisters while in the hospital and my 
journey home, for want of space, I must pass over. I 
arrived at "Camp Chase," Ohio, May 28, 1865, and was 
discharged from the service the next day. 

Engaged in farming and mechanical labor; my post- 
office address, Burr Oak, Iowa. 



THOMAS PANCLE. 

T WAS born in Madisonville, Monroe county, Tenn., 
^ on the 18th day of September, 1845. My parents 
are E. S. and H. J. Pangle, and are still living in 
McMinn county, Tenn. I was raised on a farm and 
enlisted in the service of the United States at the age 
of eighteen years. I still have my order of discharge, 
and by reference to it I see a few items of interest. I 
was enrolled at Nashville, Tenn., January 12, 1864, to 
serve three years or until the war was over, in Company 
*^K" Captain John N. Morton, 3d Regiment Tennes- 
see Cavalry, and was discharged June 10, 1865, at 
Nashville, Tenn. I was engaged in no regular battle 
during my service, spending most of my time with my 
comrades on skirmish duty. I surrendered under 
Colonel Campbell, at Athens, Ala., September 24, 1864, 



LOSS OF THE SULTAKA. 281 

and was incarcerated in prison at Oahaba, Ala., until 
March 7, 1865, and returned to our lines March 16, at 
"Camp Fisk," Miss. 

I went on board the ill-fated " Sultana " at Vicks- 
burg, Miss., April 24 or 25, 1865, with about 2,000 
other ex-prisoners. All survivors of the terrible ex- 
plosion well remember the morning of April 27, 1865, 
when a few miles above Memphis so many true and 
loyal lives were suddenly hurled into eternity. It was 
most heart-rending to witness and the recollections of 
the terrible sufferings of my unfortunate comrades and 
their heroic efforts to swim to the shore, and so many 
not succeeding who sank to the bottom of the river, is 
most pitiable to think of. It was an affair in the history 
of the rebellion, that should be immortalized and all 
survivors should praise their Maker for their escape. 

I remember well that eventful morning. I was 
sleeping with Kob Reed, Billy Milton and Jim Esters, 
and we were bunking about fifteen feet from the boiler 
when the explosion occurred. We supposed at first 
that we were being fired at from the shore, but soon 
realized our mistake. I was very much crippled up 
with rheumatism and could scarcely use my limbs, 
but being an expert swimmer, I concluded to go 
ashore. I seized a board and plunged into the water, 
but so cold was the water that I soon became powerless 
to swim, and determined to climb up on the deck of 
the steamer, where there were many throwing water on 
the burning coal, etc. We succeeded in remaining on 
the deck until eight or nine o'clock, when we were 
rescued by parties from the Arkansas shore and, 
finally, was taken aboard the steamer " Pocahontas" 



^82 LOSS OF THE SULTA.NA. 

and taken to Memphis. Among those of the passen- 
gers on the '^Sultana" I remember John Hamilton, 
Robert Hamilton, Dewitt Harris, George W. Maxwell, 
Solomon Bogard and Harlan Jones. 



JOSHUA S. PATTERSON. 

T AM a resident of Franklin township, Columbiana 
^ county, Ohio. Served in the army as a private in 
Company F, 104th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Enlisted 
in the service near Bethel Church, on the 1st of 
September, 1862. I was captured at the battle of 
Franklin, Tenn., November 30, 1864, and taken to 
Andersonville prison, where I remained until I was 
liberated April 20, 1865; discharged from the service 
May 20, 1865, at '^Camp Chase," Columbus, Ohio. 
Farming is my present occupation. 

The following is a brief account of my experience in 
making my escape from the steamer '* Sultana:" I 
was awakened from my slumbers about three o'clock 
on the morning of the 27th of April, 1865, by a terri- 
ble crash, I knew not what, but afterwards found it 
to be the result of the explosion. As I arose from my 
bed, which was at the head of the first flight of stairs, 
I received a blow on the top of my head which caused 
a severe wound, the mark of which I carry to this day. 
This wound was inflicted, I think, by a piece of tim- 
ber, it being so dark I could not ascertain how it did 
occur. Realizing my danger and perceiving the 
unusual position of the boat, I jumped down on the 
lower deck and there observed more fully the horrors 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 283 

of our situation. I had nothing to hope from human 
aid, only from the mercy of the Almighty. Dejection 
filled my mind, the consternation became general, 
nothing but sighs and groans were heard — even the 
animals that were on board uttered the most dr'oadful 
cries. Every one began to raise his heart and h^^ds 
toward heaven ; and in the certainty of a speedy death 
each was occupied only with the melancholy alterna- 
tive between the two elements of nature ready to 
devour us. The fire broke out in the vicinity of the 
boilers, which caused the soldiers to rush with tiger- 
like fury to the opposite extremity of the boat, or to 
that part farthest from the flames, without regard 
to rank, position or life, using the vain prerogative, 
*'Men Jump into the water," 

Thus many poor hapless beings were pushed over- 
board by the pressure of the horrified and strickened 
mass of humanity. The confusion was extreme. Some 
seemed to anticipate death by jumping into the river. 
Others, by swimming, gained the fragments of the boat, 
while the ropes along the side were being covered by 
the men who were suspending from them, as if hesi- 
tating between two extremes equally imminent and 
equally terrible. 

Being one of the number who were pushed over- 
board, and not versed in the art of swimming, and un- 
able to battle with the billowy waves, which rushed to 
and fro bounding like so many mad men, I realized 
that life would soon be extinct, and that it did not 
seem uncertain for what fate Providence intended me. 
Fortunately, as I arose from the bosom of the deep, I 
grasped a spar of timber which projected from the hull 



284 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

of the boat, and having hung there until my physical 
powers were nearly exhausted, in the meantime disen- 
gaging myself from two or three of my drowning com- 
panions, who came up and caught hold of my clothing. 
At this critical moment I observed a large piece of tim- 
ber floating near me, and by a special effort secured it, 
which I used to good advantage, being able to keep 
myself above water. Having floated around to the 
other side of the boat I observed men drawing their 
fellow victims out of the water by means of ropes. 
Availing myself of this opportunity, I grasped one of 
these with a death-like grip, but feeling my utter ex- 
haustion, I put my arms through the noose of the rope 
and was thus drawn up into the portion of the boat 
which had not yet sunk. In the meantime a man and 
his son had come to the rescue with their raft, and by 
this means I was transferred from the burning boat to 
land a few moments before the vessel went down. My 
first care, upon setting foot on shore, was to thank the 
Almighty for my deliverance from the jaws of death, 
and give the homage of my gratitude to Him to whom I 
was so evidently indebted for my preservation. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 285 




*''] " 




WILLIAM H. PEACOCK. 

T WAS born in Tyler county, Va., May 28, 1845. 
^ Enlisted in the service of the United States at 
Muncie, Ind., on the 15th day of December, 1863, in 
the 9th Eegiment Indiana Cavalry. Was captured at 
Sulphur Trestle, nine miles north of Athens, Ala., on 
the Nashville & Decatur Railroad, September 25, 1864, 
and confined in the Cahaba prison, Alabama. 

I was put on board the " Sultana" with eighteen 
others of my company. The boat was so crowded that 
there was not room for all of us on the second deck, so 
five of us went up on the texas roof right in front of 
the pilot house. I was the only one of the five that 
escaped. The first recollection I had of the accident, 
I was falling, and had a cut on my shoulder, bruise on 



286 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

my back and my right side and hip were scalded. This 
happened seven miles above Memphis. 

I worked my way out from under the rubbish, and 
helped get a good many of the boys out who were 
pinned down by it, until the fire got so hot that I had 
to stop and look out for myself. I saw boys start out 
to swim with all their clothes on, even their overcoats 
and shoes, but they did not go far before they sank. 
The only clothes I had on was a pair of drawers, a sack, 
a handkerchief (which one of the boys gave to me at 
Vicksburg before he died), and a hat that I picked up 
about a mile from the boat. 

I swam back to Memphis and was rescued by the 
gunboat boys and taken to Fort Pickens, seven and 
one-half miles below where the steamer's boiler 
exploded. I, with the rest, had just got out of prison, 
and only weighed ninety-one pounds. At the time of 
my capture I weighed one hundred and ninety-seven 
(107) pounds and had not been sick a day. 

My present postoffice address is Cowan, Ind. 



W. C. PORTER. 

J WAS born in Fairfield, Lenawee couuty, Mich., on 
^ the 19th of October, 1839. Enlisted in the service 
of the United States at Adrian, Mich., on the 2nd of 
August, 1862, in Company C, of the 18th Michigan 
Infantry. Was captured at Athens, Ala., on the 24th 
of September, 1864, and confined in Cahaba, Ala., or 
Castle Morgan as it is sometimes called. 
The first night, April 25, 1865, on the boat several 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 287 

of US slept on the boiler deck in a coalbin as the other 
decks were so crowded. The next day we had a very 
pleasant ride. All were joyous and happy with the 
anticipation of seeing home and friends. The moment 
the boat touched the wharf at Memphis, Tenn., the 
boys began to jump off. I went with the rest and 
roamed about town until ten o'clock in the evening of 
the 26th of April when we went back to the boat and 
as they were going to take on coal enough for the rest 
of our journey we had to find new sleeping quarters. 
After roaming around on the cabin deck as best I 
could among the sleepers, I found a place between 
the smoke stacks, and spread down my blanket and 
was about to lie down, when one of the men near by 
said that he was holding that place for another man. 
I took up my blanket and found another vacant place 
large enough to lie down, but before I laid down was 
informed that it was being held for another man. 

I made my way back to the stairs and found room 
enough by sticking my feet over the steps, laid down 
and was soon lost in sleep. I slept peacefully and 
quietly until awakened by the noise of the explosion. 
The first thought was that the hurricane deck had 
fallen in from being overloaded, but soon found out 
different. It was not long before it was all confusion, 
some singing, some praying, some lamenting, some 
swearing, some crying, and some did not seem to know 
anything. I soon made my way down stairs. In a 
short time everything available on the bow of the boat 
was thrown overboard. There were several bales of 
cotton and also some bales of hay but there were 
generally enough men that went over with them to 



288 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

load them down. When the gangway board was 
shoved over into the water there were a great many 
that went over with it. It was but a short time before 
the fire shot up and burned the boat to the water's 
edge. As the boat was crowded, the flames whipped 
down on them and those nearest the fire could not 
stand it and crowded back so that a great many near 
the edge of the boat were pushed overboard, as the 
railing that went around the boat had been torn off. 
I remained on the boat until the largest part or 
nearly all had gotten off. I took off my clothing, 
placed it between two sticks and tied them to- 
gether with a pair of suspenders, with the intention of 
using them to aid me in floating or swimming, as I 
was not much of a swimmer. When I jumped off the 
boat into the water I lost them, I do not know how it 
happened. 

The most that I was afraid of was that some drown- 
ing man would catch hold of me. While making for 
shore I passed four men astride of something, using 
their hands for oars, and one of them gave the orders 
so that they would work together. When I got to 
land, or where the land is most of the time, I found 
that it was covered with water. The trees were quite 
dense, and out in the woods a few rods I found a large 
tree that was floating in the water, climbed upon it 
and called to some others that were trying to find a 
place to get out of the water. Some came and got on 
the log with me, and several got another log near by. 
I had to rub myself considerably to keep warm, as I 
did not have any clothing on. Kemained there about 
four or five hours, when a boat came along and picked 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

US up. When I got on to the boat they gave me a 
sheet to wrap around me. When we arrived at Mem- 
phis some of the Christian Commission came on board 
and distributed some clothing (shirts and drawers) to 
those that were needy. I was taken to the Soldiers' 
Home, where in due time received a suit of clothes. 

Of the company to which I belonged there were 
fifteen on board and only three of them survived; 
William Thayer, Fairfield ; Michael Daley, Palmyra, 
now deceased, and myself. There were fifteen on 
board belonging to Company K, and only three were 
lost. Other companies of the 18th Michigan Infantry 
lost heavily, but I cannot give the numbers. 

My present occupation is farming. My postoffice 
Weston, Mich. 



37 




SAMUEL H. RAUDEBAUCH. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 291 

T WAS born near Lancaster, Fairfield county, Ohio, 
^ September 29, 1842. With my parents moved to 
Hancock county, Ohio, the 5th of June, 1848. I be- 
came a Christian by the mercy of God in August, 1853, 
and united with the church of the United Brethren in 
Christ in December, 1853. I want to say, to the praise 
of God, that He has helped me so to live that the church 
has not been necessitated to remove my name from its 
records from that day until now. I enlisted in Com- 
pany K of the 65th Regiment Ohio Infantry, Septem- 
5, 1862. The regiment was a part of the renowned 
Sherman's brigade. It's first colonel was that brilliant 
young officer. Gen. Harker. He never commanded 
the regiment much but commanded the brigade until 
he was made Brigadier General, and then he com- 
manded a division much of the time until his death at 
the battle of Kenesaw Mountain, Ga. I was married 
the 2d of October, 1862. Was detained in Ohio, one 
place and another, until some time in December, 1862, 
when about thirty of us recruits, in charge of Col. 
Castle, joined our command in a camp near Nashville, 
Tenn. Here, for twelve or fifteen days, we recruits 
had the pleasure of all the division, brigade, regiment, 
company and also that famous, wonderful, and enjoy- 
able squad drill. All those days of drill came in good 
play in the near future, for from the 30th of December, 
1862,to January 2d, 1863, we played a conspicuous part 
in the battle of Stone River, Tenn. Here, along with 
ten of my company, I was taken prisoner, but 1 played 
dead and got away from the "Johnnies," while the 
other nine comrades went on a journey to Libby. 
I was in sixteen of the hard battles of the war, and 



292 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

in the summer of 1864 on the Atlanta campaign I was 
under fire more or less almost daily from the 8th of 
May at Kocky Face Ridge to the 2d of September at 
Atlanta, Ga. On the 30th of November, 1864, at the 
memorable battle of Franklin, Tenn., I was again 
taken prisoner and this time took a trip to Anderson- 
ville, that indescribable den of suffering, sorrow and 
death. I want to say of Andersonville prison that 
human tongue has never told, nor pen ever writ- 
ten and never will tell or write the horrors, suffering 
and cruelty inflicted on the prisoners at Andersonville 
by Werz and his guards, and I firmly believe that they 
but executed the will of Jeff Davis and his allies. 

I will give some death rates that I gathered from 
official records as follows: Of 12,400 persons taken 
to the hospital 76 per cent. died. 

In May, 1864, of 18,454 prisoners, 701 died; 23 
per day. 

In June, 1864, of 26,364 prisoners, 1,202 died; 40 
per day. 

In July, 1864, of 31,678 prisoners, 1,742 died; 56 
per day. 

In August, 1864, of 31,693 prisoners, 3,076 died; 99 
per day. 

On the 23rd of August, 1864, was the greatest mor- 
tality; 127 died, one for every eleven minutes. You 
will allow me to say that I call that treatment whole- 
sale murder and that of the most cruel kind known 
to history. 

As stated above I was taken prisoner on the 30th 
of November, 1864, and hence was in Anderson- 
ville during the winter of 1864 and 1865. I, with 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 293 

eleven others, bought out of Andersonville in March, 
1865, and arrived in '* God's country," at Big Black 
river, on the 31st of March, 1865. While here along 
with thousands of paroled prisoners, Lee and Johnson 
surrendered, and President Lincoln was assassinated. 
All of us thought that the wicked slave holders' rebel- 
lion was about bursted up. 

On the evening of the 25th of April, 1865, at Vicks- 
bur^. Miss., about 2,300 of us, nearly all paroled pris- 
oners from Andersonville and Oahaba dens, were 
crowded on board the steamer '* Sultana." She arrived 
at Memphis, Tenn., on the evening of the 26th of 
April, 1865, with her load of human beings and about 
one hundred tons of sugar. She remained there until 
the sugar was unloaded. I helped unload the sugar 
and received seventy-five cents an hour for the time I 
worked. At about ten o'clock p. m. of the 26th of 
April she went to a coal barge and took on a supply of 
coal. About midnight I asked one of the deck hands, 
"How soon do you expect to start up the river?" and 
he replied, ''At one o'clock." That would be the 
mornins: of the 27th. 

Now, remember, kind reader, we were on our way 
home from the cruel war, it being virtually over. We 
were on our way home from those horrid dens of 
cruelty and starvation. Yes, we had lived through it 
all, and hoped, yes expected soon, to see loved ones and 
home and enjoy at least some of the peace we had 
fought to restore. Home! Yes, liome under the 
stars and stripes, once more. While thus pleasantly 
meditating, all of a sudden, about half -past one o'clock 
A M. one of the boilers exploded and the greater part of 



294 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

that human load was blown into the river, while sound 
asleep — some to awake in the cold water and some 
in eternity. Those that were not blown off at the time 
of the explosion were soon compelled to jump into the 
river so as to escape burning to death, for the boat 
quickly caught fire and burned to the water's edge. 
About 1,750 of that homeward-bound company perished 
then and there, and several hundred more poor fellows 
died in the next ten days from wounds, burns and 
scalds. I say, fearless of truthful contradiction, that 
the explosion of the "Sultana" was the greatest 
calamity of the war against the slave-holding rebels, 
and it was the greatest steamboat disaster known to 
history. 

You will naturally ask two questions, first, **How 
did you escape?'' and second, "How did the calamity 
occur?" To the latter question I can but give you my 
opinion, and that has never changed since I got ashore 
and took time to think. I believe that some enemy of 
our Union had a hand in crowding so many of us on the 
boat, and that he knew when that southern sugar was 
taken off that the rest of the cargo and the boat 
would meet the fate that followed. I believe that 
some ally of Jeff. Davis put a torpedo in the coal, 
while we were at Memphis, where it would go into the 
furnace for the first fire that would be built after 
leaving Memphis, with the intent to destroy the boat 
and its mass of human heroes on their way home. I 
can say that in May, 1888, a man in the south, 
William C. Streeter, St. Louis, Mo., said that he 
knew the man, Charles Dale, who said he chiseled a 
hole in a large chunk of coal, put the torpedo therein 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 295 

which did the deadly work, carried it with his own 
hands and laid it where it must soon go into the 
furnace. 

I will say one thing more and that is, if I were in 
authority I would arrest and hang the man who knew 
so high handed and bloody a murderer and did not try 
to have him brought to justice for so gigantic a crime. 

Now, as to my escape. I was lying by the side of 
the ice-box under the same blanket with J. B. Horner 
of Oo. K of the 65th Ohio, and J. W. Vanscoyce of Co. 
A of the 64th Ohio, sound asleep when the explosion 
took place. I was blown off the boat into the water 
and was under the water when I awoke. When I came 
to the surface I tried for a moment to get on the ice- 
box, for it was in the water as well as myself, but so 
many were trying to get onto it that it would do none 
of us any good, so I swam away to a spot in the river 
where there were no human beings, and there concluded 
that the boat had sank and knew no better until I saw 
the boat on fire. I soon got on a large rail and re- 
mained on it for some time. I lost consciousness and 
when I came to know again I had lost my rail. Then, 
as soon as I could I got a piece of the bannister of the 
wrecked boat, both rails together about four feet long, 
and on this little raft I remained and suffered with the 
cold and cramps until daylight, when I was picked up 
by a few boatmen of the gunboat " Essex," about two 
miles below Memphis, having floated with the current 
about ten miles, and had been in the water from about 
1 :30 in the morning until daylight on the 37th of 
April. I was taken to the Gayoso Hospital at Memphis 
and treated for injuries in my breast and groin. 



296 LOSS OF THE SULTAKA. 

I am and have for the last twenty years been a regular 
minister of the gospel of Jesus Christ in the church of 
my early choice. I want all of the readers to remem- 
ber that it costs something to preserve this govern- 
ment's interest. I want to ask you to kindly remember 
the old soldiers, and especially the surviving prison- 
ers of the late war against the most wanton rebellion 
and in support of the best government on earth. I 
wish hereby to thank God for preserving my life and per- 
mitting me to enjoy so much of the peace I suffered to 
hand down to future generations. 

Residence and postoffice address, Lindsey, Ohio. 



CHRISTIAN RAY. 

T WAS born near Centerville, Ind., January 1, 1829. 
^ Enlisted at New Westville, Preble county, on or 
about the 20th of August, 1862, in Company 0, 50th 
Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Was captured at 
Franklin, Tenn., November 30, 1864, and was con- 
fined in the Cahaba prison, Ala. 

Was put on board the '^Sultana" and started for 
Columbus to be discharged. When we arrived at 
Memphis they were unloading sugar and hogs. I think 
that a rebel fixed a torpedo in the coal. After leaving 
Memphis, having gone about seven miles above, the 
torpedo was shoveled into the fire, which caused the 
explosion between one aid two o'clock in the morning. 

It blew the pilot house and everything off within 
three feet of where my partner and I lay. The 
rubbish fell down on us and pinned us there for a 



LOSS OF THE SULTA]SrA. 297 

while. Finally we worked ourselves out and slid 
down the stayrod. The steam was so dense that we 
could not see our way, but we got down on the lower 
deck amidst the crowd. Some were praying and some 
cursing; all kinds of talk was going on. As we passed 
along we came across a stage plank about six feet long, 
three feet wide and two inches thick. My partner 
knew I could not swim. We then carried the plank 
to the edge of the boat and threw it off. My partner 
said to me, " This is all that 1 can do for you, jump 
on it." I never exchanged a word, but jumped on the 
plank, struck one edge of the board and it turned over 
with me two or three times. Finally I got my breast 
fixed on one end of it and held on with one hand and 
worked away with the other. The current being strong 
I was carried away before the main body commenced 
jumping out. Grood swimmers were fighting and 
kicking to keep off those unfortunates who could not 
swim, but all in vain. They clustered together and 
went down. When I saw this I worked harder to get 
away. 

In a short time I was out of sight, so that was good 
bye to the burning '* Sultana." I then looked up and 
thought I saw a boat coming, so I turned my board up 
the stream and worked hard for a little while but 
found it was useless. I was going down stream all the 
time, so I turned my board and let it float. I floated 
back to Memphis and lodged on a pile of drift wood. 
There were five other men screaming for life. After 
a while some "good Samaritans" ran in with a skiff 
and took us out. I was nearly chilled to death, and 
was carried up to the barracks. Here I was placed in 



298 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

front of a roaring hot fire and given enough alcohol 
to kill three men in a common condition before they 
could get a reaction to take place. I was taken to the 
hospital that night, which was the 27th of April. The 
next morning we started for Columbus where I was 
discharged and sent home. I have not done anything 
for seven years. I am totally disabled and crippled up, 
and have rheumatism, heart disease and dropsy. 
Present post office address, Greenville, Ohio. 



GEORGE F. ROBINSON. 

T WAS born in Girard, Erie county, Penn., in the 
^ year 1845, and enlisted at Charlotte, Mich., August 
1, 1861, in Company I, 6th Regiment Michigan 
Volunteer Infantry. Re-enlisted August 2, 1863. 
Enlisted again August 3d, 1864, in Company C, 2d 
Regiment Michigan Cavalry. I was taken prisoner 
November 5, 18H4, at Shoal Creek, Ala , by rebel Gen. 
Hood. Was taken across the river, and the first night 
camped at Tuscumbia. The next morning we started 
for Corinth, arriving there in the evening about eight 
o'clock. The next morning following we were put on 
the train and taken to Meridian, Miss., reaching there 
at five o'clock p. m. The first thing that greeted my 
ears on arriving at the prison was "fresh fish.'' I had 
a few rations and was told to look out or some one 
would steal them. I was much surprised to think 
that they would try to steal rations from a soldier 
who had put over three years in the service; so I took 
two pieces of rail and laid them down, took my hat. 



LOSS OF THE SULTAKA. 299 

put my haversack in it and put them both between the 
rails, and I then laid down on all and said to myself, 
**you will fool an old soldier, will you?" I slept good 
all night, and on awaking in the morning reached for 
my rations, but found none. Some one had dug a 
hole under the rails and stolen them. I tell you I was 
the most beat man you ever saw. Experience No. 1 
as a prisoner. 

About the 20th of November a party of eight of us 
commenced digging a tunnel. It was slow work for 
we had to look out for the guards, and they kept very 
close watch but we succeeded at last. Six of us got 
out, but when about sixty miles away were recaptured by 
an old woman and fifteen dogs and brought back to 
Meridian the worst looking lot of men you ever saw. 
We were covered with clay from head to foot by going 
through the tunnel, which was half full of water at 
the time of our escape. Everything went along quietly 
for about a month and then we started for Cahaba, 
Ala., the prison known as *' Castle Morgan." At this 
time my clothing consisted of shirt, drawers and one 
shoe. About six miles from Demopolis, John Corliss 
and myself made our escape by jumping out of the car 
window. I did not stop immediately but rolled along 
after the train quite a distance. I tell you I was badly 
mangled and had a big hole cut in my head, but I 
thought it was all right for I was free once more — that 
is, I was in my mind, for it was not but a short time 
before I heard the dogs and we had to go, but we 
kept away from them for five days and five nights 
when we were recaptured. We were almost starved 
and nearly frozen. Had nothing to eat but raw corn 



300 LOSS OF THE sulta:n'A. 

and no fire, and wallowing through the swamp in the 
month of December. If it tuas down south the weather 
was awful cold, for it would freeze icicles on the trees 
from three to four inches in length. 

We were taken back to Meridian and then transferred 
to Cahaba. When we got there it was the same old 
story, "fresh fish.'' I was in prison about one month, 
and then succeeded in getting out again by cutting a 
hole through the wall next to the river. John Corliss 
and myself got out but were caught before we had 
hardly got a start. We were north of Selma when re- 
captured and were put in a large hall about eighteen 
feet from the ground. We managed to get a hole 
through the brick wall, doing our work with an old 
knife and a piece of round iron — I think a piece of 
a poker. We got out all right, but did not get out of 
the city and were recaptured and taken back to Cahaba. 
In March, 1865, the water from the river flooded the 
prison to the depth of three or four feet, in consequence 
of which we were ordered for exchange. 

The next move was to place us on a stern wheel 
steamer with four large cannons on the bow, but 
before we reached our destination the boys had all the 
four guns spiked with old files they found on the boat. 
At last we arrived at camp, four miles from Vicksburg, 
and were there when President Lincoln was assassi- 
nated. In a day or two after this we were taken to 
Vicksburg and put on board the steam boat 
"Sultana." Everything went smoothly until we 
reached Memphis, Tenn., where they unloaded a large 
quantity of sugar that was in the hold of the boat. I, 
for one, helped. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 301 

Now, if my memory serves me right, there were 
about 2,300 people on board the ''Sultana." We left 
Memphis in the evening, went across the river to a 
coaling station and took on a large quantity of coal. 
I was asleep when we left and was lying on the promenade 
deck between the smoke stacks. I did not hear the 
explosion. I think I was stunned, for the first I recol- 
lected I heard some one calling ''for God's sake, 
cut the deck, I am burning to death." Then I tried 
to find out where I was and when I did I found I was 
in the coal in front of the arches. The deck I had 
laid on was on top of me. My arms were scalded and 
the hot steam was so thick I could hardly breathe, and 
in fact I gave up. My partner, John Corliss, was ly- 
ing across my legs and was dead, killed by the deck 
falling on him. I then heard someone say, "Jack, 
you can get out this way." It was some comrade 
helping his bunkmate out. This is the last I can recol- 
lect until some one put his hand on my shoulder and 
said, "What will I do? I cannot swim." I looked 
around, and my God, what a sight! There were three 
or four hundred, all in a solid mass, in the water and all 
trying to get on top. I guess that nearly all were 
drowned, but that was not the worst sight. The most 
horrid of all was to see the men fast in the wreck and 
burning to death. Such screaming and yelling I never 
heard before or since. It makes me shiver to think of 
it. At this time I was sitting on the bow of the boat 
with my arm around the flag staff, facing the Tennessee 
shore. At length the flames burned it down and I was 
forced to take to the water. I turned around and got 
in the water on the Arkansas side. There were some 



302 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. ^ 

amusing things transpired. For instance one man 
was on a beer keg, and he would crawl up on it and pray. 
He got up a little too far and over he went still hang- 
ing to it. He came up on the other side of it and the 
first thing I heard him say was " d — n this thing, it 
will drown me yet.'^ I drifted away from him, and 
could hear some poor soul say, '* My God, I cannot hold 
out any longer," and down he would go. All this 
time I kept up good courage and was sure I could get 
out all right. I got close to the islands but could not 
make the trees. The islands were all overflowed and 
some of the boys got in the tree tops. I could hear 
someone calling ''Morgan, here is your mule." It was 
a mule that saved my life and a dead one at that. I 
was almost a goner, when I saw a dark object in the 
water and made for it, and it was a dead mule, one 
that was blown off the boat. He was dead but not 
quite cold. I crawled up on him and was there when 
I was picked up at Fort Pickens three miles below 
Memphis. I was unconscious at the time, being chilled 
through, having been in the water about four hours. 
I was put in an ambulance and taken to Memphis to a 
hotel and remained there for six or seven days. Was 
then sent to ''Camp Chase," Columbus, Ohio, and 
from there to Jackson, Mich. From Jackson to Char- 
lotte, my home. Three months after I was weighed 
and my weight was 109 pounds. 

My present occupation is shoe clerk, and my post- 
oflQce address 720 Corunna ave., Owosso, Mich. 



LOSS OF THE SULTAI^A. 303 



PETER ROSELOT. 

T WAS born in France, October 28, 1849, and enlisted 
^ in the service of the United States October 6, 1862, 
at Mowrytown, Highland county, Ohio, in Company 
E, 50th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and took to the 
field almost as soon as we reached '* Camp Denison," 
Ohio, and participated in all the marches and 
battles of the regiment, including Perryville, and the 
Atlanta campaign. At Atlanta was sent back to take 
care of Hood, and fell back until we reached Franklin, 
Tenn. There I was captured on that bloody battle 
field, November 30, 1864, and taken in the front line, 
together with seven others of my company and sixty- 
two of the regiment. I was then taken back to 
Columbia, Tenn, and guarded in the stone fort, where 
I almost froze to death. We eight had to lie under 
one blanket, having lost all we had in the fight. It 
was very cold. About the time that the rebels got 
whipped at Nashville they made us get out of the old 
stone fort in a hurry and marched us through mud, 
water and rain, to the Tennessee river, where they 
ferried us across in pontoon boats, then put us on 
the cars, and we went to Corinth and then to Meridian, 
Miss. They kept us there until after New Year's and 
then we went to Selma, Ala., where they put us in 
prison over night and gave us hard tack for rations, 
the last we had until we reached our lines a few months 
later. The following morning we marched to Cahaba, 
Ala., where they searched every one of us and turned 
us into the prison. There we stayed two days before 



304 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

we received any rations, and when we did get them there 
was not much, being a pint of corn meal and a taste 
of meat. 

About this time I had to go out on the skirmish 
line every day, so as to keep our little friends from 
getting too numerous, else they would have carried us 
away. I refer to the faithful *'gray back." So it 
went on until the " mutiny," but I had no hand in 
that. Had to do without rations for three days and 
pass inspection entirely naked before the rebels, on 
account of it. Then all was well till the prison over- 
flowed. I think it was on March 1 when we had to 
hunt a dry place to lie down in. I succeeded the first 
and second night, but after that none was to be 
found. The rebels now took pity on us by taking us 
down town to get cord wood and fix up a scaffold out of 
the water. That evening we were taken out again, put on 
board a steamboat, carried down the river some miles, 
loaded a boat full of cord wood, got extra rations, 
then returned to Oahaba and unloaded part of the 
wood. We then made ready to go back in the prison, 
but the order was countermanded. We slept on the 
boat that night and got some more extra rations. 
They tasted good on that dry boat. The morning 
following we started for Selma, Ala. They put us in 
a dry prison and the next week we were under parole of 
honor, and when everything was in readiness marched 
us out of prison on board a train of cars and started 
us for Meridian and Jackson, Miss. From here we 
marched on foot to Big Black river, where we beheld 
the glorious stars and stripes once again. We cheered 
and shouted until hoarse, then we had a square meal 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 305 

of '* Uncle Sam's" gruel and then marched across 
the bridge and bid farewell to rebeldom forever. We 
were then marched within about five miles of Vicks- 
burg. Miss., where we bunked in the parole camp. 
This was on March 19, 1865. 

We were kept in parole camp till about April 25th, on 
which date we were taken aboard the ill-fated *' Sul- 
tana," and on the second night after embarking we ar- 
rived at Memphis, Tenn. After unloading a cargo of 
sugar we took on coal, then started, and when about 
eight miles up the river the disaster took place. I was 
l3'ing with two comrades on the cabin floor forward, 
between the stairway and the fore part of the boat. 
Was sound asleep, but was suddenly awakened by the 
explosion. After I had recovered from the first shock 
I climbed down on the lower deck, by means of ropes 
and spikes, to the front part of the boat, for the stair- 
way was blockaded and the upper deck or floor had 
fallen on it. Imagine, if you can, the scene that fol- 
lowed. No pen or tongue can portray it. Imagine 
yourself in the midst of about two thousand souls, all 
crowded on a steamboat torn to pieces by the explosion 
of her boiler, in the dead of the night. If I remember 
right all the after part of the deck was blown over- 
board and the forward part of the deck fell in. How 
many were killed, I cannot tell. Then in a few min- 
utes, the fire broke out, and the boat was all ablaze. 
I saw many men mangled — so me with arms and legs 
broken, others scalded and screaming in their agony, 
while others would be fighting over a piece of timber 
or plank, and some crying or praying, some jumping 
39 



306 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

in the water to escape from the fire and drowning. It 
was a scene I never care to witness again. 

There were seven of our company on the boat, and 
five of them perished. If it had not been for the grace 
of God we too would have perished. After I had got 
down on the lower deck I waited for a favorable oppor- 
tunity to save myself. After a large number of the 
men had made their escape or were drowned I watched 
for a clear space in the river, for I was afraid some one 
would catch hold of me and I would share the fate of 
the others. I jumped off into the river, and swam 
away as fast as I could for a short distance. Then I 
took it slow, for I had a mile or two to go. I got hold 
of some pieces of plank tied together with a pair of 
suspenders (doubtless the work of some poor fellow 
who had perished). I put them under my left arm 
and steered with my right, until I reached the timber 
where I expected to finddry land but was disappointed, 
for the water was so deep that we coula not touch the 
bottom with rails and poles (I say we because there 
were others within speaking distance of me). So we 
had to climb a sapling tree and roost there. I 
was almost chilled to death. If I had not held 
on to the sapling with one hand and rubbed myself 
briskly with the other I could not have survived. 

After some time, however, I got warmed up and did 
the best I could to keep the mosquitoes from eating 
me up. When the sun came up it warmed me and 
I waited patiently for help, which did not come till 
about ten o'clock that morning. When the first 
steamboat made its appearance it cheered up the poor 
boys and we shouted, but it stopped way below us, so 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 307 

did the second, third and fourth, but the fifth one, the 
little picket boat, came boldly up to where we were and 
sent out its boats and picked us all up. We then 
started for Memphis where I was taken to the 
"Soldiers' Home." Others were taken to private 
dwellings, and some to the hospital where I was taken 
later. As luck would have it here I met my comrade, 
the only other one of the seven. The others were all lost. 
This was about April 27, 1865. In a day or two we 
got some new cothing and blankets and then were 
taken aboard the " Belle of St. Louis " and steamed up 
to Cairo, 111., where we landed the next day late in the 
afternoon. I could not repress a shout of joy, when I 
again set my foot on land, for I was afraid of boats and 
water. From there I went to *^^Camp Chase," Ohio, 
and was discharged on May 20, 1865. 

Occupation, farming. Postoffice address, Mowrys- 
town, Ohio. 



ROBERT RULE. 

T ENLISTED in the service of the United States, as 
^ a private, at Nashville, Tenn., June 10, 1863, in 
Company A, 3rd Regiment Tennessee Cavalry, and 
was captured at Sulphur Trestle, Ala., in September, 
1864, and confined in the Cahaba prison. 

At the time of the explosion I, with several others, 
was on top of the boat, and we climbed down by a 
rope to the deck. One of my company and myself 
threw a trough in the river and jumped in. I did 
not catch hold of the trough, but got onto a plank 



308 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

with six others. We floated down the river two miles 
and came to some bushes. We all grabbed onto them, 
but one of my comrades lost his hold of the plank and 
was drowned. The next morning we were picked up 
by a boat and taken to Memphis. 

Occupation, farming. Postoffice address, Rockford, 
Blount county, Tenn. 



O. C. RUSSELL. 

T ENLISTED at Somerset, Ky., June 1863, as 
^ a private in Company 0, 3rd Tennessee Cav- 
alry, and was captured at Sulphur Branch Trestle, 
Ala., I think in September, 1864, and confined in 
the Cahaba prison. Was released about one month 
previous to the explosion. I took the boat at Vicks- 
burg, about the 26th of April. We stopped at 
Memphis and unloaded hogsheads of sugar. I 
was asleep when we left there, but was awakened 
when the explosion took place. A party of us 
threw a staging overboard, got upon it, and were 
rescued at Memphis and taken to a hospital. From 
there we went to Cairo, 111., then to Indianapolis, Ind., 
and on to Columbus, Ohio. Was discharged from the 
service in June, 1865. 
Occupation, farming. Postoffice, Morgantown, Tenn. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 309 

S. F. SANDERS. 

T WAS born in Farmington, 111., April 16, 1845, and 
^ enlisted in the service of the United States at 
Bushnell, 111., May 12, 1864, in Company I, 137th 
Regiment Illinois Volunteers. Was captured at Mem- 
phis, Tenn., August 21, 1864, and confined in the 
Cahaba, Ala., prison. 

The western boys were sent to Springfield, 111., 
several days before the " Sultana" was loaded. I was 
nursing the sick in the barracks and did not leave 
Vicksburg until the last boat load, and so far as I have 
ever known I was the only Illinois boy on the boat. 
I had charge of sixteen sick comrades, who were sleep- 
ing in front of the cabin. I had just laid down when 
the explosion took place. About daylight I was 
pushed off from the stern of the boat into the water. 
I climbed on the rudder and remained there for some 
time with eleven others until it got too hot for us. 
Fortunately for us we made our way to a platform on 
one side of the boat and were rescued by rebels on a 
raft. 

Occupation, physician; postoffice address, Hold- 
rege. Neb. 



C. S. SCHMUTZ. 

T WAS born in Congress, Ohio, on the 22d of July, 
*^ 1846. Enlisted in the service of the United States 
at Congress, Ohio, on the 2d of August, 1862, in Com- 
pany I, 102d Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Was captured 
at Athens, Ala., on the 24th of September, 1864, and 



310 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

confined in Oahaba until the 24th of March, 1865, 
when I was released and sent to Vicksburg, Mississippi. 

My experience in regard to the explosion of the ill- 
fated " Sultana 'Ms as follows: In the afternoon of 
April 26, 1865, we arrived at the city of Memphis, 
Tenn., where was unloaded a number of hogsheads of 
sugar, which I think was one of the causes of the ex- 
plosion. There were about 2,300 persons on board. 
A great many of the soldiers were on the upper decks, 
and as the boat came round a bend of the river it would 
careen, the water rushing to one side of the boilers, 
the others would become heated, and as the boat 
righted the water would rush to the heated boilers, 
thus causing the explosion. 

Before leaving the wharf at Memphis I went asleep, 
but I remember being awakened by the boat coaling 
up, some distance up the river. I soon went asleep 
again, and the next I knew I felt a burning and falling 
sensation and remember calling *' What's the matter?" 
Being a good swimmer I had no fear. My first im- 
pression was that I had been thrown into the river and 
I tried to swim to the boat. I soon found many in the 
river like myself. That the boiler had exploded never 
entered my mind. Presently I saw flames and knew 
then that the boat was on fire. In the meantime I 
came across some wreckage of the boat, among which 
was a piece of a cracker box. It was sufl&cient to 
support me. I also found out that I was scalded about 
the face, and every now and then plunged my face into 
the water to cool it off. I made no effort to swim 
ashore, as I knew the river had overflowed its banks, 
and I did not relish the idea of climbing a tree to get 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 311 

out of the water when I had nothing on but my shirt. 
That would be very unpleasant. 

I took my chance going down the river, as I knew 
we could not be far above Memphis. I had for com- 
panion awhile a man who was moon-eyed and could 
not see at night. He was floating on a long board and 
generously offered to share his board with me, but I 
had all the support I needed. After I had been in the 
water about two hours, I heard some one rowing a boat 
and I called for help. The reply was '^Here's one." 
Then I saw the boatmen row towards me and they 
pulled me in the boat. I now found I was badly 
scalded on my left side and back. After picking out 
of the river a few more of my unfortunate comrades 
the boat rowed for the shore and we were landed and 
taken to a convalescent camp, where I continued to 
suffer the most excruciating pain. I ran up and down 
in the cool air to relieve the pain. I felt easy going 
against the wind, but returning it was excruciating. 
I was urged to lie down, but for a time refused ; 
finally I yielded after putting on a pair of cotton 
drawers and shirt. I laid down on a cot that had 
been prepared for me. Soon afterwards an ambulance 
came and took me to Grayoso Hospital where I lay for 
ten days, during which time I fully recovered and, 
getting transportation, I was sent to Columbus, Ohio, 
where I was discharged from the service. 

My present occupation is clerk. Postoffice address, 
Wooster, Ohio. 



312 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 



C. G. SEABURY. 

T WAS born in Verona, Oneida county, N. Y., in 
* 1844, and enlisted at Quincy, Mich., November 17, 
1862, in Company B, 8th Michigan Cavalry. Was 
captured near Mt. Pleasant, Tenn., November 20, 1864, 
and confined in the Meridian, Miss., and Oahaba, 
Ala., prisons. 

Postoffice, Coloma, Mich. 



W. R. SHAUL. 

T WAS born in Clark county, Ohio, February 27, 
^ 1836, and enlisted in the service of the United 
States at Cable, Ohio, July 16, 1862, in Company E, 
95th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Was cap- 
tured at Guntown, Miss., June 12, 1864, and confined 
in five prisons, namely: Anderson ville, Millen, 
Savannah, Blackshear and Thomasville. 

I swam from the burning wreck to the Tennessee 
shore securing a window shutter to help me; got into 
the woods, caught hold of a limb of a bush, and held on 
until daylight. Then I swam to a log about twenty- 
five yards distant, and got upon it. I was picked up 
by the steamer '^ Silver Spray." 

Occupation, dealer in general merchandise. Address, 
Cable, Ohio. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 313 



I. N. SHEAFFER. 

DOEN in Lancaster, Pa., December 5, 1833, and 
^-^ enlisted in the service of the United States at 
Canton, Ohio, September 5, 1862, in Company E, 115th 
Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Was captured at Nashville, 
Tenn., Dec. 4, 1863, and confined in the Meridian, 
Andersonville and Cahaba prisons. 

I floated down the river on a door to Memphis and 
was picked up by negro troops. 

Occupation, tailor. PostoflSce address, Canton, 
Ohio. 



PAYTON SHIELDS. 

T ENLISTED in Company D, 31st Eegiment Ohio 
^ Volunteer Infantry. When the explosion of the 
" Sultana '' took place on the morning of the 27th of 
April, 1865, on the Mississippi river, I was on the 
hurricane deck attending to a sick comrade, and, at 
his request, had just lain down with him only a few 
minutes when the explosion occurred. I was slightly 
scalded but remained on deck until the flames became 
so hot that I could remain no longer. I then jumped 
from the wheel house into the water, a distance of 
perhaps thirty-five feet. I struck on my feet and at 
once began swimming. After going a distance of 
about three miles I caught hold of a piece of weather- 
beaten board about six feet long which proved to be a 
great help to me. I continued swimming and floating 
with the current until I was seven miles below the 
wreck, when I was picked up, more dead than alive, by 



314 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

a yawl from the gunboat "Essex/' and have never seen 
one well hour since. 

As soon as I was able to travel I left Memphis and 
went on board a steamer for Cairo, III., remaining 
there one night, then took the train for Mattoon, 111., 
where we were met at the depot by the citizens with 
hot coffee and a bountiful supper. I then proceeded 
to Indianapolis, from there to "Camp Chase," Ohio, 
reported to Col. Richardson and was discharged 
from the service. 



A. SHOEMAKER. 

T WAS born in Canal Winchester, Ohio, March 3, 
^ 1845, and enlisted in the service of the United 
States at Elmore, Ohio, November 29, 1861, in Com- 
pany E, 72d Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and 
was captured at Guntown, Miss., June 10, 1864, and 
confined in Andersonville, Savannah and Lawton 
prisons. 

I do not think it worth while to give my "Sultana" 
experience. 

My postoffice address is Carroll, Ohio. 



W. T. SHUMMARD. 



T WAS born in Clermont county, Ohio, July 25, 
* 1835, and enlisted in the service of the United 
States at " Camp Clay," Ohio, September 11, 1862, in 
Company A, 7th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 315 

and was captured between Nashville and Columbia, 
Tenn., November 27, 1864, and confined in the 
Meridian, Miss., and Oahaba, Ala., prisons. After 
being a prisoner five months, on the 23d of April, 1865, 
I, with about 2,000 prisoners of war, was driven like 
so many sheep on board the " Sultana" at Vicksburg. 
We went to Memphis and stopped and unloaded some 
freight, then to the coal docks and took on some coal. 
We then proceeded up the river about eight miles, 
when her boilers exploded (this was about the 27th of 
April, 1865) about two o'clock a. m. I and twelve 
comrades lay side by side asleep, just in front of the 
boilers, on the lower deck. The first that I knew, I 
was holding to a chain at the bow of the boat; had 
a bump on the back of my head, was badly scalded on 
the side of my head and face, and my feet also. I tried 
to climb up several times on the boat not knowing what 
had happened. At length a man caught and pulled 
me up, then I saw what had happened. Of the twelve 
men who laid beside me, there was but one saved 
beside myself, this was John Bell of the same com- 
pany and regiment. I staid on the boat until 8 A. m., 
as I could not swim, then with thirteen comrades left 
the boat on a small raft, and was taken back to Mem- 
phis, and soon after went to *' Camp Chase," Ohio, 
my native State. On Saturday, the 20th of May, was 
discharged and went home. 

Occupation, farming. Postoffice address, Brazilton, 
Kansas. 



316 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 



J. L. SLICK. 

T WAS born in Monroe county, Michigan, 1844, and 
■^ enlisted in the service of the United States at 
Detroit, February 22, 1864, in Company A, 18th 
Eegiment Michigan Infantry, and was captured at 
Athens, September 24, 1864, and confined in the 
Cahaba, Ala., prison. 

When the explosion occurred I was thrown against 
the wheel house and knocked insensible. When I 
came to I helped a comrade on a board six inches wide 
and four feet long, and as he was no swimmer I took 
charge of the craft. We landed on a log at seven o'clock 
A. M., and while there I drew a comrade out of the 
water who had his leg scalded so badly that the flesh 
dropped off. 

Occupation, merchant. Postoffice address Lamberts- 
ville, Mich. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA, 



317 







COMMODORE SMITH. 

T WAS born in Holmes township, Crawford county, 
*^ State of Ohio, on the 18th day of January, 1842. 
Removed with my father's family to Hillsdale county, 
State of Michigan, in the fall of 1854. 

My great-great-grandfather and my grandfather 
were soldiers in their day, and my father, Isaac Smith, 
with his three sons and son-in-law participated in the 
late war for the union of the States in America. Father 
was a member of Company C of the 1st Michigan Vol- 
unteer Infantry. He was born of Scotch and English 
parentage in the year A. D. 1809, in eastern Virginia, 
being at the time of his enlistment (in October, 1861,) 
fifty-two years of age. He received a wound in the 
head and was taken a prisoner of war on the third day 
of the notorious seven days battle before Richmond, 



318 LOSS OF THE SULTAN^A. 

Va., under the command of Gen. Geo. B. McOlellan. 

Was taken to Richmond, and confined in that h 1 

commonly called *'Libby prison" for a period of about 
three months. He was soon afterwards paroled and 
sent to exchange camp, near Alexandria, Va., where 
after eight days (from exposure, starvation and disease 
contracted while a prisoner) he died. '' Peace be to his 
ashes," whilst his blood crieth aloud for vengeance and 
just retribution against the rebel hordes that caused 
his suffering and death. 

My eldest brother, Columbus Smith, was a member 
of Company I, 18th Regiment Michigan Volunteer In- 
fantry, and enlisted August 11, 1862, and died at Lex- 
ington, Ky., of typhoid pneumonia, December 28, 1862. 

My youngest brother, James Henry Smith, was a 
member of Company K, 27th Regiment Michigan 
Volunteer Infantry. He served to the close of the 
war and was discharged with his regiment. He died 
at Cambria, Hillsdale county, Mich., from the effects 
of la grippe, December 31, 1891. 

My eldest sister's husband, Andrew A. Ewing, was 
a member of Company — , 2d Regiment Michigan 
Volunteer Infantry. He served to the close of the war 
and was discharged with his regiment, and is still living 
at this date, April 10, 1892, in Hillsdale county, State 
of Michigan, and long may he live to enjoy reunions 
with his old comrades. 

I, myself, was a member of Company F, 18th Mich- 
igan Volunteer Infantry. I enlisted August 11, 
1862, at Hillsdale, Hillsdale county, State of Michigan. 
Was captured September 24, 1864, by consolidated 
bands of guerillas, at Athens, Ala., the notorious 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 319 

rebel General N. B. Forrest being in chief command. 
I was taken to Cahaba, Ala., and there confined in 
prison for a period of nearly six months, and was 
reduced to a mere skeleton. My weight when cap- 
tured was 175 pounds, and when I reached our lines at 
Vicksburg, Miss., March 16, 1865, my weight was 94 
pounds, although I had not been sick a day while in 
prison. 

We remained at Vicksburg until April 25th or 26th, 
when we, to the number of 2,333 souls, all prisoners, 
were taken on board the ill-fated *' Sultana." At the 
time her boilers exploded I was lying sound asleep on 
the lower deck, just back of the rear hatchway to the 
hold. I was not long in waking up, for I was nearly 
buried with dead and wounded comrades, legs, arms, 
heads, and all parts of human bodies, and fragments 
of the wrecked upper decks. I struggled to my feet 
and tried to go forward on the boat, but could not on 
account of the wreckage and carnage of human freight 
which now covered the lower deck. The surface of the 
river for rods about the boat was covered with the 
same kind of wreckage. I remained on board the hull 
of the boat for perhaps twenty or thirty minutes, 
throwing overboard all the loose boards and timbers 
and everything that would float to assist those in the 
water and save them from drowning if possible. 

And now occurred the hardest task of my life. The 
boat was on fire and the wounded begged us to throw 
them overboard, choosing to drown instead of being 
roasted to death. While our hearts went out in 
sympathy for our suffering and dying comrades we 
perfori»ed qxit sad but solemn duty. I say we because 



320 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

there were others besides myself who were fortunate 
enough not to be hurt or blown overboard by the 
explosion, and they too were doing all they could to 
alleviate the sufferings of their unfortunate comrades. 
We waited hoping, but in vain, to be rescued from the 
burning wreck. When at length the last shadow of 
hope had expired, and we were forced to leave the 
burning boat and try our luck in the seething, foam- 
ing, cold and turbulent waters of the mighty Missis- 
sippi, and this too at about two o'clock in the morn- 
ing and almost total darkness prevailing, except the 
light from the burning wreck, we proceeded to per- 
form carefully, but hurriedly, the most heart rend- 
ing task that human beings could be called upon to 
perform — that of throwing overboard into the jaws 
of certain death by drowning those comrades who were 
unable on account of broken bones and limbs to help 
themselves. Some were so badly scalded by the hot 
water and steam from the exploded boiler that the 
flesh was falling from their bones. Those comrades 
who were doubly endeared to us through mutual 
suffering and starvation while we were penned up in the 

rebel h s, or so called confederate prisons, and who 

instead of throwing them thus overboard, we were 
wanting to render every kindness to, dress their wounds 
and soothe their sufferings. But, alas! this was 
impossible, the only alternative was to toss them over- 
board. 

Reader of this narrative, do you not think that this 
was a hard task for us to perform? If not, just 
hearken to this a moment; listen to the heartfelt 
prayers of those suffering and wounded comrades and 



LOSS OF THE SULTAN"A. 321 

hear their dying requests as they commended their 
wives, children, fathers, mothers, sisters and brothers to 
God's kind care and keeping, and hear them thanking 
us for our kindness to them, notwithstanding the 
pain they were suffering. They fully realized the 
fact that their last day, hour and even last minute to 
live had come; and then to hear the gurgling sounds, 
the dying groans and see them writhing in the water, 
and finally see them sink to rise no more until the 
morning when all shall come forth. Was this not 
heart rending to us? My heart, even now, after 
twenty-seven years, nearly stands still while I write 
this sad story. After we had thus cared for the help- 
less ones, I leaped over the burning wreck into the 
mighty waters and headed for Memphis, Tenn., which, 
from this point, was about seven miles down the river. 
I was a good swimmer, and after encountering several 
whirlpools and being carried around and around in 
them, each time being carried back into the center of 
the river, by hard struggling, keeping a cool head 
and using my dexterity as a swimmer I finally reached 
a point half a mile above the city of Memphis where I 
lodged in a tree out in the flits of the river. The 
water at this point was about twenty feet deep. I 
remained in the tree until a boat came, just at dawn, 
and picked me up together with twenty-seven others. 
Was afterwards taken to the city where the Christian 
Commission cared for us until we were able to resume 
our journey homeward to "God's country," as we 
called it, there to meet our loved ones from whom we 
had long been parted, and once more to enjoy the 
blessings of a free and united country, which we had 
41 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 



SO dearly bought, the price being "blood." Occupa- 
tion hardware merchant. Postoffice address, Remus, 
Mich, 



TRUMAN SMITH. 

T WAS born in New Castle, Pa., February 6, 1848, 
^ and enlisted in the service of the United States at 
Gun Plains, Allegan county, Mich., August 4, 1864, in 
Company B, 8th Regiment Michigan Cavalry. On the 
24th of November we met the enemy near Henryville, 
Tenn. There was but a handful of us against the 
army of Hood and Forrest. As the firing grew sharp 
orders came for us to mount and retreat to the barri- 
cade, but my horse was gone. 

I made my escape into the woods with the rebel 
cavalry in close pursuit. Fortune favored me. There 
was a small marsh just ahead and I went through the 
mire and came out on the opposite side. The rebel 
cavalry tried to follow me but the horses mired. I 
thought I would try and find my regiment. I stayed 
at the house of a Union man all night and then started 
next morning for Columbia, Tenn. On my way I 
came across a wagon train which I supposed was our 
own, but it proved to be a rebel train. I rode two 
miles, and under the pretense of joining a rebel army 
that was passing, got off. I then went to the house of 
a Union man who gave me a blanket and some pro- 
visions and conducted me to a cave, saying it would 
not be safe for me to stay at the house as there were so 
many rebels around. I remained there two days and 
then started for the woods, but was met, not ten feet 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

away, by some rebels. Of course I had to surrender. 
They took my arms and robbed me of everything. 
Then I was taken to their camp. The night was very 
dark and I slipped past the guard and made my escape, 
but was soon captured again by a squad of rebel cavalry. 
They hurried us on until we reached Columbia, where 
they put us in Fort Misner. There were about 1,700 
Union prisoners there. The rebels were on one side of 
Duck river and the Union forces on the other. We 
remained here several days until Hood was defeated at 
Nashville. Our rations consisted of corn on the cob 
from once to twice a day. We left in December for 
the Tennessee river. The ground was covered with 
ice and some of the boys had no shoes on — you could 
track them by the blood from their feet. We forded 
streams and camped where night overtook us. We 
crossed the Tennessee, river and here about 400 escaped. 
The rebels pricked us with bayonets and drove us like 
cattle to Corinth, where we stayed a day or two and then 
started for Meridian arriving there on the 25th of De- 
cember. There were two stockades, one for Union 
prisoners and one for rebel deserters. A squad of us 
were put in the latter place. A day or two later we 
started for Cahaba, reaching there about the 1st of 
January. We were put in prison with about 3,000 
others. Our rations here consisted of about a pint of 
meal (ground cob and all), and that mouldy ; once in 
ten days we would receive about two ounces of meat to 
the man. This we cut up in bits, and made porridge 
with our meal. 

There was one attempt made to liberate the prison- 
ers worthy of note. The author of the scheme was 



324 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

Oapt. Hanchett. His idea was to overpower the guards, 
take their guns and fight our way out. About one 
o'clock A. M. when everything was still and the guards 
had made their rounds, we heard a cry for help. They 
had succeeded in capturing the interior guard, but as 
they made for the door the bar was dropped in place 
and we were securely trapped. A long struggle en- 
sued before the guards found out the leader of the re- 
volt. They furnished neither rations nor allowed us 
to build a fire until our leader should be produced. 
For three days we had nothing to eat and no fire, and 
then Capt. Hanchett gave himself up, saying it was 
better that he should die than should hundreds, who 
would surely perish in their famished condition. They 
took him out, tried him by court martial and sentenced 
him to be shot. He never gave away those who were 
associated with him in the plot to liberate the pris- 
oners. 

We remained at Meridian until March. One day an 
order came for 300 men to load a boat with wood. We 
went down the Alabama river about seven miles, when 
the boat went ashore and we were taken off to load 
wood. We carried steadily until we had some 200 
cords aboard. This occupied the whole day and we 
then started back to Cahaba. We were permitted 
to stay on the boat that night. In the morning we 
were taken to Selma and put in the stockade, we 
remaining there but a few days, when the other prisoners 
from Cahaba were sent there. We crossed the river 
the same night and then took the train for Meridian, 
Miss., arriving there just at dark and found ourselves 
back in the old stockade once more. The following 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 325 

morning we took the train for Jackson, reaching there 
about night. Now we were nearing our lines and 
learned that our troops were near the Black river— less 
than forty miles. We were several days making the 
march. What a glorious sight met our eyes when we 
got there! On the opposite side floated the stars and 
stripes. Orders were to go into camp for the night, 
but I stole away and swam across the river and was 
once more under the old flag. 

Everything was excitement here. News came of the 
fall of Richmond and the surrender of Lee. Every- 
body was wild with joy and the thought of a speedy 
return to our homes. Salutes were fired from all the 
forts. Our joy, however, was of short duration, for on 
the 14th of April, as we got up in the morning, we 
found the colors at half mast. It was sometime before 
we knew the cause and then we learned that President 
Lincoln had been assassinated. All thought of home 
was banished for the time being and every man swore 
revenge. Everything was gloomy till about the 24th 
of April, when word came to get ready to go home. 
Everybody was ready. 

It was a short march to Vicksburg where, lashed to 
the wharf, was the ill-fated steamer "Sultana," on 
which a still greater horror was in store for the 
boys. We numbered about 2,200 from Castle Morgan 
and Andersonville, the greater part from Castle 
Morgan. When we boarded the *' Sultana '^ every 
foot of her deck was covered with men who had fought 
starvation, vermin and filth. Memphis was reached 
without accident and we got off the boat and went to 
the '^ Soldiers' Rest," where I got something to eat. It 



326 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

was about midnight when the boat again got started 
up the river, and just after everybody had got settled 
down to sleep, except those in charge of the boat, there 
was a crash and all at once confusion. Some one cried 
out that the rebels had fired onto us. I thought a 
shell had exploded near me, but found it was hot 
steam. I jumped up, threw off the blankets and found 
that the boat was wrecked. The boilers had exploded 
and the boat was on fire. I started around to see what 
the chances were for getting ashore. The fire was 
burning fast and furious, and men who were buried 
beneath the wreck were crying for help. When the 
fire lit up the water men could be seen in every direc- 
tion and also pieces of the wreck. 

The first one of our company that I met after the 
explosion was Henry Norton. H3 had lost a bundle 
of clothes and swore that he would shoot the man 
who stole them. I told him he had better let the 
clothes go and make up his mind to swim ashore. He 
said not until he found his clothes. He was an excel- 
lent swimmer and thought he could swim ashore in a 
few minutes. I left him there and went to look 
around. I saw that the pilot house was gone and that 
one stack lay across the deck. The fire was making 
great headway and men were begging, for God's sake, 
to have some one help them. It was getting so hot 
that I concluded to leave the boat. I looked around 
for something to hold me up in the water, but could 
find nothing as we were on the hurricane deck and 
had slept on the wheel house. The only thing that I 
could see was an empty pork barrel,and thinking, per- 
haps, that would hold me, threw it into the water and 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 327 

jumped in after it. At this time I had all my clothes 
on. My barrel was worthless and sank. I started to 
swim but found that some one had hold of me and I 
could not get loose. We had a struggle in the water 
and I freed myself by giving him my blouse. The 
night was dark and I could not see which way to go. 
I swam but a few feet when I found myself with four 
or five others. It seemed as though we all wanted to 
get hold of each other. I succeeded in getting the 
rest of my clothes off and got rid of my company. It 
was only a few minutes before some one had hold of 
me again. This time I came near drowning. I kept 
getting away from the boat and about an hour after 
it blew up I heard some one calling for help. I had a 
piece of four foot wood that would keep me up nicely. 
I swam towards the comrade and found it was Henry 
Norton. I gave him the piece of wood and swam 
away. He must have been chilled through for he was 
found clinging to the piece of wood. I swam on 
trying to make shore. There was a large tree floating 
down the river and on the roots were three or four 
men. They were singing the " Star Spangled Ban- 
ner." As I swam away I heard some one coughing 
and swam toward him. As I came near he kept swim- 
ming away. I called him and asked what regiment he 
belonged to. He asked what I wanted to know 
for. I told him I would write to his people in case 
he drowned and I should get out. He said I must 
not come any closer, and we made a bargain that if 
one should die and the other get ashore the survivor 
should write the parents and let them know. We 
kept swimming till near daylight, when some one 



328 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

cried " Halt!" We swam toward shore and as we 
came closer the command to "Halt,'' was repeated. I 
replied that we could not as we were in the water. 
Finally we got to shore and we were told to get out, 
but my limbs were so benumbed that I could not. 
The man came to the water's edge, took me by the 
arm and pulled me ashore, but I could not stand on 
my feet. He called his comrade who was in the tent 
and they together picked me up and put me in their 
bed, and then went back and rescued my comrade. 
They built a fire and rubbed us and gave us some 
clothes. 

After a while we saw a boat coming up the river and 
we hailed it. It had started to pick up the survivors 
of the wreck. I was the first and my comrade next. 
The first thing after we got on the boat they brought 
me a tin cup of whiskey which I drank. I had got so 
that I could walk by this time. We kept going up the 
river, picking up men and making them comfortable 
as possible. We picked up about one hundred and 
started for Memphis,reaching there about eight o'clock. 
The dock was covered with ladies belonging to the 
Christian and Sanitary Commissions, who gave us each 
a pair of drawers and a shirt. I started up town, but 
at the first block I came to there was a great crowd and 
they wanted to know if I was on the boat. I said yes, 
and they gave me a suit of clothes and thirteen dollars 
in money. From there I went to the '^Soldiers' Rest" 
and was afterwards sent to the hospital. I called for 
paper and wrote a letter home, giving a detailed ac- 
count of the disaster. Then I became sick and was 
unconscious. What became of the clothes and money 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 3)89 

I never knew. I was taken care of by Comrade White. 
My journey to Columbus must have been a tedious one. 
Here we met several of our regiment and among 
them was Chas. Seabury, he having his hands and face 
badly burned from the fire on the boat. We also met 
Ezra Spencer. 

Present occupation, Captain No. 5 steamer, Grand 
Kapids fire department. Postoffice address. No. 5 En- 
gine House, Grand Rapids, Mich. 



EDWARD SORGEN. 

T WAS born in Switzerland, in 1842, and enlisted in 
^^ the service of the United States at Kenton, Ohio, 
April 16, 1861, in Company G, 4th R >giment Ohio Vol- 
unteer Infantry, and was captured at Gettysburg, July 
2, 1863, and confined in the following prisons: Belle 
Isle, Andersonville, Millen, Savannah, and Blackshear 
Station. 

At the time of the explosion of the boiler of the 
*' Sultana'^ I was knocked overboard and swam and 
floated down the river to a little below Memphis, where 
I was picked up by three men in a skiff and put on 
board one of our gunboats. This was about break of 
day; in the morning I was sent to a hospital and re- 
mained there only a short time, when I was sent to 
Columbus, Ohio. 

Occupation, manufacturer and dealer in furniture, 
Postoffice address, Kenton, Ohio, 



330 LOSS OF THE SULTAN^A. 



M. H. SPRINKLE. 

T WAS born in Richland county, Ohio, September 15, 
^ 1841. Enlisted in the service of the United States 
at Ashland, Ohio, on the 15th day of April, 1861, in 
Company B, 16th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry. 

We were taken from the battle field at Athens, Ala., 
September 24, 1864, where 350 of us, under Lieuten- 
ant Col. Elliot, held our own for six hours against 
15,000 under Forrest. Our ammunition giving out we 
were obliged to surrender, became prisoners of war, 
and taken to Cahaba prison. To give a correct im- 
pression of one's sufferings would be impossible, ex- 
cept to those who have endured the hardships of such 
a place. I, like all the others, had to give up my 
watch, chain and money — what I had not succeeded in 
hiding in my waistband. An officer came in and ex- 
changed my new hat for his old one, and detecting 
that I had on two pairs of pants pointed his revolver 
at me and demanded the new pair which I had been 
fortunate enough to secure only the day before. 

Our food consisted of a pint of corn chop once a day, 
providing the guard did not forget us, which he did 
sometimes. The longest time he forgot me was four 
days. We had nothing but the hard earth or boards 
on which to sleep. Thinking I could make a better 
place than this for my head, I cut off my pants legs and 
filled one with the sif tings of my corn chop, giving the 
other one to a comrade for a like purpose. 

We stayed in this prison until the first of April, 1865. 
A call was then made for 800 men to form in line. I 
was one of the first to fall in, for I did not care where 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 331 

we were going. It seemed that nothing worse could 
be given us than what we were receiving ; but our feel- 
ings can better be imagined than expressed when, after 
lying two weeks in parole camp at Vicksburg, we heard 
that a boat was waiting at the river for us. The re- 
port turned out to be true. The boat was the ill- 
fated steamer '^Sultana" and she was headed for Cairo. 
Eighteen of my company were upon the hurricane 
deck at the extreme stern of the boat. Of that num- 
ber I know of but four that escaped the terrible acci- 
dent of the morning of April 27th. On that morn- 
ing, about two o'clock, one of the boilers exploded. 
The boat soon took fire, and Billy Lockhart and my- 
self threw at least fifty of those who had been wounded 
in the explosion overboard, thinking it better that 
they should take their chances of drowning than be 
left to burn up, which they would do if left on the 
boat. Finally we were compelled to go as the deck 
was about to fall in. I then noticed Charley Ogden, of 
my company, who appeared to be standing in a dazed 
condition. I spoke to hiai, telling him he must go 
or he would burn, but he appeared to take no notice 
of what I said. I felt the deck tottering and ran and 
sprang into the river. As I came to the surface the 
deck had fallen in and I have no doubt Charley per- 
ished in the flames as he had not made a move when I 
left him. I swam over to the west side of the river, 
but the banks were too steep for me, so the only 
alternative I had was to float down the stream, which 
I could easily do, or drown. I chose the former, 
but was nearly exhausted. On my way down the 
stream I came in contact with two men who were 



332 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

clinging to a trapdoor about three feet square ; neither 
of them could swim and as I was floating so easily 
along they begged me to help them get out. I steadied 
their raft for them and pushed it along down stream. 
We were going along fairly well when a drowning 
man seized my left leg. I tried to kick him loose but 
failing I let go the raft and tried to force him off but 
could not, and was obliged to drag that dead weight 
until we reached Memphis. We were helped out of 
the water just above the wharf by citizens, and the 
last I can recollect was they were trying to pry the 
dead man's grip loose from my leg. The next I 
knew I was on the boat and having a very hard chill. 
The captain gave me some brandy and I think I must 
have drank at least a pint before I began to feel the 
effects, then I began to sweat profusely. The citizens 
afterwards took me home with them and gave me a 
suit of clothes. I stayed with them about nine days, 
finally starting up the river on the steamer " Belle 
Memphis," and reaching home on the 21st day of May, 
1865. 

My present occupation is that of a mason. My 
postoffice address, Eaton Rapids, Mich. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 333 



E. J. SQUIRE. 

T WAS born in Nor walk, Ohio, January 8, 1839, and 
^ enlisted in the service of the United States at 
Monroeville, Ohio, August 9, 1862, in Company D, 
101st Ohio Volunteer Infantry. I was captured near 
Huntsville, Ala., January 17, 1865, and confined in 
the Selma and Cahaba, Ala., prisons. 

Occupation, dry goods and boot and shoe dealer, 
Monroeville, Huron county, Ohio. 




^^ AMI 




JOSEPH STEVENS. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 335 

T WAS born in Yorkshire, England, in 1842, and 
-^ came to this country when a boy with my father, 
mother and one sister. My brother Thomas was born 
in Hillsdale, and mother died when he was a baby. 
Soon after her death father went back to England to 
attend to some business and died there. I, but a mere 
lad, took care of myself, sister and baby brother by do- 
ing anything I could get to do. 

June 20, 1861, when but nineteen years old, I en- 
listed in Company E, Capt. W. Lombard's company, 
at Hillsdale, Mich., and was mustered into the 4th 
Michigan Infantry, in command of Col. D. A. Wood- 
bury, at Adrian, Mich. The regiment left its rendez- 
vous for Washington, June 25, arrived during the 
night of July 2, and went into camp near Georgetown, 
where we joined the Army of the Potomac. We re- 
mained here in camp but a few days and then were or- 
dered to Bull Run, but were halted at Fairfax Court 
House, nine miles this side, until further orders. A 
message came from Washington to be delivered to 
Gen. McDowell commanding the Union forces at Bull 
Eun. I was detailed to deliver it, and was told to take 
the first horse I came across. I captured a fine bay 
stallion from a rebel planter living near by. I mounted 
him and delivered my message. When I arrived there 
I found the army retreating towards Washington, and 
we camped near there all winter. In the following 
spring we went with Gen. McClellan's army down in 
front of Richmond. We were engaged in the battle of 
Yorktown, defeated the '^rebs," and then marched on 
towards Richmond. At New Bridge, seven miles this 
side, our regiment was ordered to the front, where we 



336 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

met the ^^ Louisiana Tigers" and killed and captured 
half their number with but a small loss on our side. 
In the seven days' fight in front of Eichmond I was 
captured and sent to Libby prison. I was there but a 
short time when I was exchanged on account of sick- 
ness, and was sent to Philadelphia hospital, remain- 
ing there until I received my discharge, when I went 
home. 

I was home only one week, for, as they were organiz- 
ing a company in Hillsdale, I re-enlisted in the 1st 
Michigan sharpshooters and encamped at Kalamazoo. 
I was made Sergeant of Company B, and being a 
veteran was appointed drill master. Shortly after this 
we were mustered into the regiment under command 
of Col. C. V. DeLand. 

We assisted in driving Morgan out of Ohio and In- 
diana, and then returned to Dearborn, Mich., and 
proceeded under orders to " Camp Douglass," Chicago, 
where we were placed on duty guarding a camp of 
rebel prisoners. We remained in Chicago nearly six 
months and then were ordered to Annapolis, Md., to 
join the Army of the Potomac. We arrived there in 
due time, and proceeded to Warrenton Junction. A 
few days later we marched across the Rapidan river, 
and the following two days were engaged in the battle 
of the Wilderness, we sustaining a very small loss. 
Marching with the army to Spottsylvania Court 
House we participated in a three days' fight, suffering 
very severely. From there we marched on to Cold 
Harbor, where we were engaged again, but being in 
the supporting line suffered but little. We arrived 
in front of Petersburg June 16, 1864, and on the fol- 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 337 

lowing day happened one of the most prominent events 
in the history of this regiment. At night, while 
charging into the *' rebs," I had a rooster tied to my 
belt that I had just captured, intending to have a 
feast for supper, but I was captured in that action, 
still holding onto the rooster, and it was eaten by the 
^'Johnnies." The 14th New York Heavy Artillery 
was on our extreme left, and when the rebels came 
rushing out of the woods, charging upon us with a 
terrible yell, the New York regiment, like a flock of 
sheep, ran and left us. This left our extreme left with- 
out any support, and the ^'rebs^-came upon us with 
a furious charge, but we met them with cold steel and 
had a fierce struggle until we were overpowered and 
obliged to surrender, leaving most of our regiment 
killed wounded and captured. 

I was then taken to Petersburg to the provost marsh- 
al's office to be searched. I had two twenty dollar 
greenbacks hid on my person where they could not find 
them. There I was put in a tobacco house which was 
used as a temporary prison. The next day a squad of 
us were detailed to go after some rations. I was one 
of the first who volunteered to go, thinking I would 
have a chance to escape, but they had us guarded too 
strong. Oa our way a party of women that were 
standing before a mansion spit in our faces. I then 
said to the guard : " We wouldn't allow you men to be 
treated so in the north." He replied, *'keep still you 

d n yank, or I'll shoot you." They kept us here 

a few days under G-rant's fire. One of his shells struck 
the roof of the tobacco house, but injured no one. 
From here we were loaded into box cars a-nd sent to 
43 



338 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

Andersonville prison. We were eight days on the 
road, and on arriving my money was all gone— I had 
spent it for food. 

We were then taken to the stockade in which were 
imprisoned at that time thirty thousand Union men. 
Here I met a number of my old comrades who were in 
my company (4th Michigan), captured the preceding 
year. My friends warned me of a gang of raiders, men 
who had become desperate. When new prisoners 
came these men would rob the poor fellows and some 
times cut their throats. We formed a company to 
capture the leaders of this notorious gang. We cap- 
tured six of them and turned them over to the rebels 
for safe keeping until we could send word to Gen. Sher- 
man to ask what we could do with them. His answer 
was, "court martial them, and do what you think 
best." They were then "court martialed " and 
sentenced to be hung, and the balance of the raiders 
to run the gauntlet. We had a scalfold erected inside 
the stockade, and then the rebels delivered them over 
to us. We stood them in a row each with a rope 
around his neck. Our minister then offered a prayer 
for them, and when he finished the trap fell, but the 
rope broke and let one of them loose. He ran through 
the crowd but was soon brought back and seeing the rest 
hanging pleaded for mercy, but the cry was, "string 
him up." He was put upon the scalfold the second 
time and hung there with the others until sun down, 
so everyone could have an opportunity of seeing them, 
as a warning for the rest of the gang. They were 
taken down and buried all in one grave. 
The food they gave us was corn cobs, all ground up 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 339 

and made into mush, and there wasn't near enough 
of that to keep the boys alive any length of time. 
Those that lived had to speculate by trading their 
brass buttons, boots, etc., with the guards. There 
were from one hundred to one hundred and 
fifty boys dying every day. A large wagon, drawn by 
four mules, was used in drawing out the dead. They 
were laid in as we pile cord wood and taken to the 
burying ground, generally putting fifty in a grave, and 
returning would bring mush in the same wagon, where 
worms that came from the dead could be seen crawl- 
ing all over it; but we were starving, therefore we 
fought for it like hungry hogs. 

The squad that I was in was quartered on the north 
side of the creek which ran through the prison. The 
boys would dig wells in the day time and at night 
would dig tunnels and attempt to escape. Very few, 
however, ever succeeded, for the *'rebs" would set 
the blood hounds on the track. The hounds would 
tree them and wait for their masters to come to shoot 
the poor fellows down, but sometimes would bring 
them back unharmed. One day there was a call for a 
detail of men to go to the hospital to help take care of 
the sick. A friend, by the name of William Smith, 
was quartermaster of the hospital. He had been cap- 
tured a year before and was a comrade of mine out of 
Company E, 4th Michigan. By the aid of friend 
Smith I was put on the detail list, and was made ward- 
master of one of the wards. The first day I was in 
there the rebel doctors left prescriptions to give the 
sick. I killed seven boys that evening from the effects 
of that medicine. I told Smith I couldn't do that 



340 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

work any longer, and tho next day I played off sick so 
as to get off duty, and the doctors left me medicine to 
take, but I wasn't prepared to die and so did not 
take any. I then commenced to make a kind of beer 
which is good for dysentery. It was made of corn 
meal, molasses and water. I would let it ferment and 
sour over night in a barrel, and then deal it out to the 
boys, a cupful only to each. This was much better 
than the rebels' medicine. It was the means of saving 
the lives of a good many boys. I would trade this 
beer off for brass buttons and postage stamps and then 
would take these and trade with the guards for sweet 
potatoes. For doing this, I was taken before Werz, 
the captain in command of the prison, and a villain 
who would shoot our men down in cold blood. I ex- 
pected to be dealt with the same, but fortunately some 
of my friends (Union men) were clerking for him, and 
when he was about to shoot me, after taking an oath, 
with his revolver, the boys talked to him and begged 
him not to. I was then searched and ordered back to 
the hog pen, where I remained for ten long months. 
About the middle of April, 1865, there came an 
order for an exchange of prisoners. Although my 
name was not called for exchange, I stole away, secreted 
myself in a box car and was carried through to Vicks- 
burg, Miss., with the others. I think where our ex- 
change took place was at Black river bridge near Vicks- 
burg. We then crossed the pontoon bridge into our 
lines and proceeded to get clothing and recruit up. 
We remained there about ten days. I met my brother- 
in-law, Wm. Finch, here. He had just been ex- 
changed from Oahaba prison in Alabama. 



LOSS OF THE STJLTAiq-A. 341 

On April 25th, 1865, about 2,000 of us, just released 
from rebel prisons, were put aboard the ill-fated steamer 
"Sultana" and started for home. We stopped at Mem- 
phis, Tenn., to take in coal and unload 300 hogsheads 
of sugar. While there I and my brother-in-law took 
a walk up town to get something good to eat which we 
had not tasted for many a long day. When we returned 
we took our blankets and laid down on the hurricane 
deck next to the wheel house to sleep and dream of 
our dear ones at home, and believing that in a few more 
hours we would be in their embrace. I at once fell 
asleep and did not awake until the boiler blew up, six 
or seven miles above Memphis. The boat was soon in 
flames and the screaming and moaning from those 
that were injured was something terrible. Hundreds 
of them would jump into the water together, clinch 
each other and go down in one body. My brother- 
in-law commenced fretting and crying because he 
couldn't swim. I could not swim either and begged 
him not to get discouraged and give up for there was 
some hope yet of being saved. He started for one 
of the life boats and I warned him to keep away from 
them, for those in first were knocking everybody in 
the head that tried to get in. That was probably 
where he lost his life. I remained on the boat pray- 
ing until the fire burned me off. On falling into the 
river I sank, never expecting to arise again, but by 
some means I came to the surface again and saw the 
captain tearing off window shutters and throwing 
them into the river for the boys. 

I now commenced swimming dog-fashion,' but my 
strength soon gave out and I began to strangle. I 



342 LOSS OF THE SULTAKA. 

yelled for help, and comrade Charles Taber, one whose 
life I had saved while in prison, heard and knew my 
voice, and swam away from the bale of hay on which 
he was floating, caught me by the hair and with the 
aid of the other men who were on the bale, pulled me 
on top, and thus in turn saving my life. I was chilled 
and lost consciousness, and when I came to I asked 
if it had been raining for I was wet through. We 
hung onto the bale and floated down six or eight miles 
below Memphis, where we were picked up by a gun- 
boat that was out for the purpose of rescuing survivors 
of the wreck. The Sisters of Charity were there ready 
to take care of us. We were then taken to the 
hospital in Memphis, where I remained about two 
weeks. I can well remember seeing the captain put- 
ting life preservers on his wife and little girl and 
letting them overboard. The girl's life preserver 
slipped too far down for she was found (drowned) 
floating with her feet upwards. His wife was saved 
and the captain lost his life in trying to save others. 
We had a number of mules aboard the boat and some 
of the boys hung on to their tails while they swam to 
shore. Others would get out by means of planks and 
barrels. 

This was one of the most terrible steamboat disasters 
that history has ever recorded, over 1,500 perishing. 
I was taken to '^ Camp Chase," Ohio, where I received 
my discharge, and then started for Hillsdale to meet 
my brother and sister. I have left a great deal out 
which I would like to have mentioned, but thinking I 
am taking more space than is my share in your 
book I will close. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 343 

Am now living in East Buffalo, N. Y., in live stock 
commission business, under the firm name of Dun- 
ning & Stevens. 



GEORGE W. STEWART. 

I ENLISTED in the service of the United States, on 
^ the 6th of January, 1862, as a private in Company 
D of the 40th Regiment Indiana Veteran Volunteers. 
Was on duty in the Army of the Cumberland until the 
battle of Franklin, Tenn., which took place on the 
30th day of November, 1864, where I was taken pris- 
oner. I was captured at the time of the charge of the 
rebels under Gen. Pat. Cleburne, and sent to the rear 
as a prisoner of war. I had $200 and a silver watch 
worth $50 taken from me. From the battle field 
I was taken to Columbus, Tenn., and kept there 
until the last of December, then marched to Corinth, 
Miss., from there by rail to Meridian, thence to Selma, 
Ala., and finally to prison at Cahaba, Ala. In this 
prison there were about 2,500 prisoners, and we were 
all on short rations, the customary treatment of pris- 
oners by the Confederate States. I cannot tell 
the date when I left the prison, but think it was the last 
of February, 1865. I was with the first detachment 
that was sent to Vicksburg, Miss., and a hard time we 
had of it. We did a great deal of forced marching to 
get there. I never can forgive the quartermaster for 
not giving us rations on the night we arrived at Black 
river. He held the rations on one side of the river 
and us on the other side fourteen hours without any- 



344 LOSS OF THE SULTAl^-A. 

thing to eat. We lay ia camp until we were placed 
on board the *^ Sultana." I had a jolly trip to Mem- 
phis. Being the son of a steamboat captain I was at 
home on the river. At Memphis I was in town till 
midnight, and was awake when the boat was at the coal 
yards. At the time of the explosion I was sound asleep 
on the larboard wheelhouse water-box on the hurricane 
deck. When I awoke I was standing about ten feet 
from the box in a thick steam. While there my com- 
rade, George A. Kent, came to me from the roof of the 
texas and asked me what was up. I told him that 
the boat had blown up, and if she did not catch on fire 
we were all right. Just at that moment the fire burst 
out where the chimneys had stood. I then told him 
we would have to swim or burn. I urged him to go 
with me to the texas to see if we could obtain any- 
thing to swim upon. We started together and that is 
the last I saw of him. I got two bed slats and went 
aft of the wheelhouse on the hurricane deck, and wit- 
nessed the drowning of hundreds of men. I saw the 
stage plank go overboard loaded with men and go 
under with them. When it arose there were only two 
or three clinging to it. I kept my post aft of the 
wheelhouse until the fire forced me to jump. 

I at once swam away from the boat and would not 
let anyone come near me. By the light of the 
burning wreck I could see timber on the south or east 
bank, up the stream from me, and I believed that I held 
my own against the current for over one hour, when I 
discovered the boat was drifting and I was not going 
to the timber. I then changed my route and went 
with the current, and landed on an island three miles 



LOSS OF THE SULTAKA. 345 

above Memphis, just at daylight, and fought mosqui- 
toes until half past ten o'clock when I was taken on 
board a steamer to Memphis. The next day I went 
down to the river and met Capt. Oarmer and with him 
to New Albany, thence to see my parents in Kentucky. 
Was discharged on the 29th of May, 1865, at Indian- 
apolis. 

Occupation, farming. Postoffice address, Welling- 
ton. Kan. 



SAMUEL STUBBERFIELD. 

T WAS born in McOane county, Pa., September 9, 
1843. When I was about two years of age my 
parents moved to Ottawa county, Ohio, from there to 
Williams county, Ohio, and in 1854 I, with my 
parents, moved to Wright township, in Hillsdale 
county, Mich., where I lived at the breaking out of 
the rebellion. I enlisted in the service of the United 
States on the 26th of July, 1862, in Company F, 18th 
Michigan Infantry, for three years or during the war 
unless sooner discharged. I left the State September 
4, for Cincinnati, Ohio, where we took up our line of 
march through Kentucky. Reaching Lexington I 
spent most of the winter in the hospital and conva- 
lescent camp, and about the first of April, 1863, left 
the State with my regiment for Nashville, Tenn., 
where I remained about fourteen months. I then left 
for Decatur, Ala., and was one of the detail that 
routed the rebels at Pond Spring on the 29th of June, 
1864, capturing nine wagons and two ambulances that 



346 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

the rebels had taken from an Indiana regiment some 
time before this, and also one of their wagons and two 
of their ambulances. Was also one of the detail that 
helped to rout the rebels at Oourtland, Ala., on the 
27th of July, 1864, losing only one man from my 
company. 

On the 24th of September I was in the detachment 
ordered to reinforce the fort at Athens, Ala. When 
we got within a mile of the place we were attacked by 
an overwhelming force of rebels at about six o'clock in 
the morning and we had to fight our way until twelve 
o'clock. As we neared the fort that we were to 
re-inforce we received grape, canister, and shell from 
the fort, its commander having surrendered it, and our 
little band with it, without our knowledge, but our 
small force (four hundred), fought the rebel G-en. 
Forrest's force six long hours before surrendering, when 
we were completely surrounded and were finally com- 
pelled to give in. 

We afterwards took up our line of march for that 
miserable prison, Oahaba, Ala., at which place we 
arrived October 6, 1864, and remained there until the 
4th of March, 1865. When I left the prison the water 
was from six inches to four and one-half feet deep all 
over the entire enclosure, had been so for seven days, 
and had been six inches deeper. I slept two nights on 
a sixteen inch wall which was fifteen feet above the 
water, and some of the boys did their cooking among the 
braces of the roof. On the date before stated (March 
4), I got aboard a steamer and steamed down the Ala- 
bama river, up the Tombigbee river as far as navi- 
gable, and then by rail to Meridian. From thence we 



LOSS OF THE SULTA^-A. 347 

were sent to Jackson, Miss., and from there we marched 
to Vicksburg, where we went into parole camp March 
16, 1865. 

On the 25th of April, 1865, was placed on board the 
steamer "Sultana," which was to carry us homeward 
to friends and loved ones ; but alas, hundreds passed on 
to the '' City of Death " to await mothers, fathers, 
sisters, brothers and lovers, whom they had expected 
to meet in a few days, but were destined to pass over 
the river whence no parting ever comes. We reached 
Memphis on the 26th of April, and while unloading 
sugar there the staging parted, one-half turning over 
catching my right foot and leg to the knee, and bruising 
my foot badly. It soon swelled as full as the skin 
could hold and pained me badly. When the explosion 
took place at two o'clock a. m., April 27, 1 could not 
bear any weight on my foot, but was compelled to 
leave the boat, being forced off by the flames. I picked 
up a 4x4 scantling, which some one had discarded, and 
went to the rear part of the boat, jumped off into the 
river and sank for a moment in that chilling ice- 
cold water. 

On coming to the surface again I struck out in the 
same direction that most of the others did, but think- 
ing I had not acted wisely I turned around to go in 
the opposite direction when some one caught hold of 
my frail bark. Not feeling like parting company with 
my little craft so soon I clutched it with all my might 
and eventually succeeded in releasing it. I then 
struck out in the direction of some trees, reaching the 
little cottonwoods just at daylight. The little trees 
were so frail, however, and the water so deep, that my 



348 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

little craft with what trees I could get hold of would 
not keep me out of the water, and I Jwas compelled to 
remain here until about eleven o'clock in the morn- 
ing of April 27th, when I was picked up by the 
steamer '^Silver Spray" and taken to the hospital at 
Memphis, Tenn. I remained in the hospital until 
about the middle of May when I was sent to the Sol- 
diers' Home where I was discharged the service and 
reached my home on the 19th of May, 1865. 
My occupation is farming. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 



349 




PERRY S. SUMMERVILLE. 

T WAS born in Clay county, Ind., on the 4th of 
^ March, 1846. Enlisted on the 5th of December, 
1861, in Company K, 2nd Indiana Cavalry. 

I was captured at Stilesborough, Ga., September 13, 
1864, while out with the forage train. When we were 
attacked by the enemy I jumped from the wagon and 
fell between the wheels, the hind wheels passed over 
my right leg, breaking it. I was put on a mule and 
rode till noon, then I was put in a wagon and hauled 
two days in it. When we got to Jacksonville, Ala., I 
was left at the hospital for a few days before sending 
me on. The man that kept the hospital gave me a 
fine comb, which was the means of catching at least 



350 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

fifty thousarid inmates of the prison, and his lady gave 
me a ten dollar bill. 1 was then taken to Talladega, 
Ala., and placed in a cell about fourteen feet square. 
There were about twelve rebels in with me. I was 
there a few days and was sent to Selma, Ala., and was 
again put in jail, but this time in a larger and cleaner 
one. I was kept there a few days when I was sent to 
Cahaba. The last of September I was put in the 
prison with some Tennesseans. As I entered the 
prison the boys halloed, " Fresh fish," an article I was 
standing in need of at that time. I put in a part of 
the day taking in my situation and looking for the 
old man Brown who was taken prisoner with me. 
Night came on and I had no place to lie down only on 
the ground and without blankets. The only article I 
had in the shape of a bed was my crutches, which I 
used for a pillow. The nights were very cold. Next 
morning my clothes looked more like pepper and salt 
goods than blue. I had amusement for a few hours in 
using my thumb nails. 

I hadn't been in this prison long before my leg was 
so bad that I was taken out to the hospital ; but to see 
the dead carried out every morning was too much for 
me and I went back to the stockade. I made me a 
knife out of a piece of hoop iron while out; so Brown 
and I were in very good shape as he had a railroad 
spike to split wood with and I had a knife to eat mush 
with. We were better fixed than the average of the 
prisoners. Wood as well as provisions was scarce. 
We would split our wood up very fine so to make a 
quick fire to make our mush or gruel. Wood being 
so scarce I worked up one of my crutches to cook with 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 361 

before I was able to do without it. I next burned a 
part of the other one, and one night I failed to lie on 
my cane and some fellow stole it with which to cook his 
breakfast. That left me in a bad fix. Our prison was 
furnished with river water. The water passed through 
the city in pipes to a hydrant outside the prison where 
the stock came to drink. The people would wash 
there and then the water would pass down through 
the prison for us to drink and cook with, but still it 
was one of the purest articles we got. 

I was standing near a comrade one day who hap- 
pened to get his foot on the dead line, the guard above 
shot at his foot, barely missing it, and the ball glanced 
back striking the roof. I saw a number of men shot and 
one man killed by having a bayonet run through him. 
He suffered the most before he died of any man I ever 
saw. Some time in February the boys undertook to 
break out. They were successful in capturing the in- 
side guards, but the rebels ran their artillery up to the 
prison gate and said, ''they would rake the prison in 
five minutes if we didn't lie down.'' One of the guards 
reported that he had wounded one of the boys and the 
next morning the officers ordered us to give up the 
leaders of the mutiny; that being denied they then 
called for the wounded man and said if refused they 
would strip us and have him at all events. Being 
again refused, they proceeded to examine us, making 
us strip off naked, pass out through the gangway be- 
tween two oflBcers with our clothing rolled in a bundle 
and held on our heads, turn once around and then pass 
out in plain view of the city. The man was wounded 
in the hand;, so they didn't get him. Their next re- 



352 LOSS OF THE SULTAN"A. 

sort was to starve us. They stopped our meal for three 
or four days but found that would not do, and when 
we got our meal and beef we did not take time to cook 
it, the beef was sour in the bargain. 

Some time in March the Alabama river arose and 
flooded the city and our prison. The water was from 
two to five feet deep all over the prison. They took 
out about 700 prisoners and sent them up to Selma, 
Ala. The rest remained in the prison. The boys 
floated in wood and made bunks to sit on, four or five 
sitting on one bunk. The water became so filthy that 
we would wade out to the stockade and hold our cups 
to catch the clean water as it came through the cracks. 
They allowed us to go on the dead line for that pur- 
pose. The officers of the prison would come into the 
prison in canoes. 

The river was still up when I waded out for 
exchange. I, with the rest of the prisoners, was taken 
by the way of Jackson, Miss., and remained in parole 
camp four miles out from Vicksburg for a few weeks, 
when we were exchanged and put on the steamer 
"Sultana" at Vicksburg. My quarters were on the 
cabin deck on the guard on the left hand side over 
and opposite the boilers. We arrived at Memphis 
early in the evening of April 26th. There she 
unloaded a large amount of sugar, after which she 
ran up to the coal barge to take on coal, and that was 
the last I knew till 1 was in the river. When she 
blew up I was thrown at least one hundred feet. The 
first thought that struck me was that she was running 
close to the shore and that I was dragged off by the 
limb of a tree. I was very much excited for a few 



LOSS OF THE SULTAN^A. 35^^ 

minutes and commenced to swim towards the boat 
calling for help, but I had not gone far when I saw 
there was something the matter on board. I could see 
steam and fire and hear the screams of those on board, 
so I commenced to swim down stream. I had not 
gone far before the boat was all in flames. I managed 
to get hold of a rail which proved of much assistance 
to me, and I could see by the light from the burning 
boat as many as twenty go into the river at once. 

As I was passing the islands I could see the timber 
on my right and left but I could not make to the 
shore. Some two miles above Memphis I got a large 
plank which I drew across the end of my rail in front 
of me and held the rail with my feet and the plank 
with my hands. I lay so near the top of the water 
that I was almost freezing, and when taken out of the 
water couldn't stand. I was hurt in the breast and 
scalded on the back, and spit blood for some time from 
the effects of the injury in my breast. Was rescued 
at Memphis by a colored man who picked me up in a 
canoe and took me to a boat to get warm. After I 
had been there a few minutes a young man was 
brought in who was so badly scalded that his skin 
slipped off from the shoulders to the hands. They 
wrapped him up in oil and he walked the floor until a 
a few minutes before his death. There was a lady 
brought in also who had a husband and some children 
on board. She was almost crazy. I don't think she 
ever heard of them after that terrible morning. 

As I was floating down the river I met a gunboat, 
but it didn't stop to pick me up. Also I saw a horse 
floating down the stream with six or eight men 
45 



354 LOSS OF THE SULTAKA. 

hanging on to him. When I heard him coming I 
tried to get to him, but when I saw his load I kept 
clear for fear some of the boys would get all I had at 
that time in the world — my rail and plank. There 
was a man by the name of Jerry Perker, of the 2nd 
Michigan Cavalry, swimming near me. All knew 
Jerry, and the boys as far as they could hear him 
would ask what he thought of our case. He would 
cheer the boys by telling them to hold out and we 
would get out. I saw him after we got out. He 
floated on a barrel. I had on a pair of socks that 
bothered me more than anything else. They worked 
partly off my feet and would catch on my rail which 
caused me to almost sink. My companion's name was 
Kibbs; what became of him I have never learned. 
He was cheerful except when talking about his little 
girl. There were three of us from Brazil, Ind., two 
were lost, I being the only one of them saved. I was 
taken to the hospital. After remaining there two or 
three days we started for *^Camp Chaso," Ohio, but 
when we arrived at Indianapolis Gov. Morton, the war 
governor, stopped us Indiana soldiers. 

Mypostoffice address is Brazil, Ind. My occupation 
is farming. 



WM. THAYER. 



T WAS born in Watertown, N. Y., October 25, 1845, 
^ and enlisted in the service of the United States at 
Adrian, Mich., August 7, 1862, in Company C, 18th 
Kegiment Michigan Volunteer Infantry. Was cap- 



LOSS OF THE SULTAl^A. 355 

tured at Athens, Ala., September 24, 1864, and con- 
fined in the Oahaba, Ala., prison. I was lying in the 
alley way of the second deck when the boat blew up. 
I stayed on the boat until I saw two scantlings tied to- 
gether with a pair of suspenders, I thought they 
would help me along and they did, for I floated down 
the river for about six miles and then neared the shore. 
I climbed a tree and tied myself there with my shirt, 
and about two o'clock p. m. I was picked up and taken 
to the hospital at Memphis. 

Occupation, farming. Postoffice address, Fairfield, 
Mich. 



MARIAN THOMAS. 

T WAS born in Monroe county, June 17, 1832, and 
^ enlisted in the service of the United States at 
Kentucky, February 1, 1863, in Company E, Third 
Tennessee Cavalry, and was captured at Athens, Ala., 
on the 23rd of September, 1864, and confined in the 
Cahaba prison. 

After the " Sultana '' exploded I was in the water 
four hours. Was taken on board a gun boat, more 
dead than alive. 

Occupation, farming. Postoffice address, Maryville, 
Blount county, Tenn. 



356 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 




SAMUEL J. THRASHER. 

T WAS born in Hawkins 
^ county, East Tenn., on 
the 19th of November, 1839. 
Enlisted at Louisville, Ky., 
Februarys, 1863, in Company 
(x, 6th Eegiment Kentucky 
Cavalry Volunteers. Was cap- 
tured near Tuscaloosa, Ala., 
March 31, 1865, and confined 
in a prison at Marion, Ala. 
On the evening of the 25th 
of April, 1865, at^Vicksburg, Miss., I was put on board 
the ill-fated '^Sultana," which steamed up the great 
"Father of Waters," until it reached Memphis, Tenn., 
where it landed and put off some freight, then went 
up the river to the coal yard, coaled for Cairo, 111., 
and then after proceeding about seven miles the boiler 
of the boat exploded. This occurred on the 27th of 
April, 1865, at about half-past two A. m., there being 
on board at the time 1,966 paroled soldiers, a part of 
whom were killed by the explosion and others crippled 
or maimed. 

When the steamer caught fire almost every one on 
board became frightened. The writer could not swim 
and thought his chance for life was slim, and stood 
holding to a small rope to keep the men from crowding 
him overboard. A comrade, Abraham Ehodes, here 
said if we would not get excited we could save our- 
selves. After the crowd quit surging so there was no 
danger of being knocked overboard, we got the cable 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 357 

rope and made it fast in the rings on the bow of the 
boat and threw it over into the water. We then made 
a large chain fast in the same way and threw it over. 
When the heat became so intense we could not stay 
on the boat any longer we went down into the water, 
under the bow of the boat, holding to the rope and 
chain until the cabin burned down. There were 
several swimming around and when they saw the chain 
and rope they laid hold of it. After the cabin had 
burned down, those who had got into the river pre- 
pared to swim, having on only shirt and drawers, 
climbed back on the boat and threw down a rope 
which we put under our arms and they drew us 
up to the hull of the burning steamer. After all 
were back on the hull we went to work and put out 
the fire, so that it would not sink so quickly. 

As we were drifting down the river we struck a 
grove of saplings. We had made a small raft out of 
the timbers of the boat and ran out a line, made 
fast to a sapling and stopped the boat or hull. Some 
of my unfortunate companions went out to a house 
that was surrounded by water, got a large hewed log 
and fastened it to the raft, brought it in and took out 
as many as twelve at a time by lying flat across the 
log. The raft made some three or four trips before 
all were taken off. The writer and one of the 3rd 
Tennessee Cavalry were the last to leave the boat, and 
had not been off the hull but a short time when it 
went down. After a while a picket boat came up and 
took us back to Memphis where we were cared for in 
the hospital. From there we went by boat to Cairo, 
111., and then to Louisville, Ky., then to Nashville, 



358 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

where I was mustered out on the 23rd day of July, 
1865. 
Present postoffice address. Brown's Cross Roads, Ky. 



CASWELL C. TIPTON. 

T WAS born in the year of our Lord, 1844. Enlisted 
^ in the service of the United States on the' 21st of 
September, 1862, at Blount county, Tenn., as a private 
in Company B, 3rd Regiment Tennessee Cavalry. Was 
taken a prisoner at the battle of Sulphur Branch 
Trestle, Ala., on the 25th of September, 1864, and 
confined in Cahaba prison, Ala. 

With others I was brought to Vicksburg, Miss., and 
sent north on the steamer '^Sultana." After the 
explosion of her boiler I remained on the boat but 
a short time. In company with six or seven other 
soldiers I made my escape on a plank that had been 
used in loading and unloading barrels. We were in 
the water until about daylight when we were rescued 
by parties in a small boat opposite Memphis, Tenn. I 
was afterwards sent to " Camp Chase," Ohio, and 
from that place to Nashville, Tenn, where I was dis- 
charged from the service on the 10th of June, 1865. 

My present postoffice address is Trundle's Cross 
Roads, Sevier county, Tenn, 



LOSS OF THE SULTAl^A. 359 

WILSON S. TRACEY. 

T WAS born in Holmes county, Ohio, April 1, 1842, 
* and enlisted in the service of the United States at 
Wooster, Ohio, August 7, 1862, in Company H, 102d 
Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Was captured at Athens, 
Ala., September 14, 1864, and confined in the Cahaba 
prison. 

Occupation farming. Postoffice, Fredericksburg, 
Wayne county, Ohio. 



ROBERT A. TRENT. 

T WAS born in the year 1840, and enlisted in the 
^ service of the United States at Flatlick, Ky., on 
the 11th of March, 1862, as 4th Sergeant and Company 
Clerk of Company B, 1st Regiment Tennessee Cavalry 
Volunteers. I was captured at Shoal Creek, Ala., 
while in action, on the 5th day of November, 1864. 
Was taken to prison at Meridian, Miss., remaining 
there about two months, thence sent to Cahaba, Ala., 
where I was detained until about the 1st of April, 1865, 
and then sent to Vicksburg, Miss. 

About the 25th of April, 1865, 1 was placed on board 
the steamer "Sultana," my destination being "Camp 
Chase," Ohio. I, with many others, landed for a short 
time at Memphis, Tenn., on the evening of the 26th of 
April. We started up the river about two o'clock in 
the morniog of the 27th, and when we were about nine 
miles above Memphis the boiler of the boat exploded. 

At the time of the explosion I was very weak from 



360 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

sickness and could scarcely walk across the boat, I 
had laid on some plank under the cabin, which was 
back of the wheelhouse, and soon fell asleep. I was 
struck on the left side of the head with something 
which cut a gash about two inches in diameter to the 
skull, and I was knocked down on some mules that 
were under me. The lights were all out and it was 
pitch dark. I saw what was the trouble in an instant. 
The people all seemed excited and hundreds of them 
were jumping into the river. 

I remained on the boat as long as possible, knowing 
that it would be sure death for me among the crowd 
that was in the water, for they were fighting and 
clinging to one another and making all sorts of noise. 
When they got out of the the way I jumped into the 
water on the Tennessee side of the boat, and swam 
about seven miles, when I got hold of some brush. 
This is the last that I remember until late in the even- 
ing when I awoke and found myself in the hospital 
at Memphis where I remained several days unable to 
get out, but, by the help of God and kind physicians 
I recovered. I am very sorry that I do not know their 
names so I can thank them for their kindness 
toward me. 

I was discharged from the service in May, 1865, at 
Nashville, Tenn. 



ISAAC VAN NUYS. 

T WAS born in Wayne county, Ind., January 8, 1838. 
^ I enlisted in the service of the United States on 
the 23rd of April, 1861, at Richmond, Ind., as a 



LOSS OF THE SULTAIS'A. 361 

private in Company D, 57th Indiana Veteran Volun- 
teer Infantry, for three years. Re-enlisted as Veteran 
Volunteer Infantry, January 1, 1864, in the same 
company and regiment. I was captured at Franklin, 
Tenn., November 30, 1864, and exchanged April 1, 
1865, at Black river, near Vicksburg, Miss. Was 
confined at Meridian, Miss., most of the time while a 
prisoner. 

After lying in '* parole camp " at Vicksburg for a 
few weeks was sent north on the ill-fated steamer 
" Sultana," April 25,1865. We, to the number of about 
2,300 prisoners, were marched from the camp and 
loaded on the '' Sultana" at Vicksburg. When we 
were crowded on the vessel, I think it was six times 
its capacity, we were huddled together like sheep for 
the slaughter, many as yet suffering from battle 
wounds and most of them emaciated from starvation 
in prison pens, as all conversant with Andersonville 
can testify. Now, however, they were en route for home, 
the cruel war was over and their cause triumphant. 
The visions of loved ones greeting their return, and of 
dear familiar scenes and the quiet peaceful life were again 
theirs to pursue. All this filled their hearts with joy, 
making their bearing and conversation a study in 
human nature, rare even in those stirring days. Mem- 
phis was reached on the 26th of April. After coaling 
the steamer proceeded. So far the presence of danger 
was not manifested, nor was it in any sense anticipated. 
That very night, however, at two o'clock a. m., just as 
we had made eight miles above Memphis, suddenly 
and without any warning the boiler of the steamer 



362 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

exploded with terriffic force, and in a few minutes the 
boat burned to the water's edge. 

No adequate cause for the explosion has ever been 
ascertained. The steamer was running at her proper 
speed (nine or ten miles an hour). No peril seemed 
imminent and the event remains yet a mystery. The 
scene that followed the explosion was simply horrible 
beyond words to depict, but it was of short duration 
as the glare of the burning steamer that illuminated 
the sky and made visible the awful despair of the hour 
soon died away, while darkness, all the more intense, 
settled down on the floating hulk and the 2,300 vic- 
tims of the explosion, who, maimed or scalded, in ad- 
dition to battle wounds, were borne down by the un- 
pitying flood whose rapid current was strewn with the 
bodies of the dead and the dying and but few, in fact, 
but what were injured. This casualty transpired in 
time of intense excitement and never had the attention 
it ought to have had, following closely as it did the 
assassination of President Lincoln and the close of the 
war. Death and destruction had been in the land for 
four years, and nearly 400,000 had already given up 
their lives in defense of the national flag, that it 
might wave over a free country. 

[ had been in prison and witnessed the awful scenes 
there and on many a battle field. I thought I had 
seen all the horrors of war, but this disaster was the 
most heart-rending of any I had seen in my four years, 
service. I was on the hurricane deck in rear of the 
pilothouse, asleep, when the explosion occurred. I 
was so shocked that I couldn't tell what had happened, 
for a moment, but soon found that the boat had been 



LOSS OF THE SULTAliTA. 363 

blown to pieces in front of the pilot house and those 
that could work were fighting the fire to keep the rest 
of the vessel from burning, but it was soon given up 
to the flames. I couldn't swim, and was trying to 
make up my mind whether it would be better to stay 
on the boat and burn or to drown in the deep water 
below. After reflection I came to the conclusion I 
would stand on the deck, and saw by the ligjht of the 
burning vessel that the water was full of drowning 
men and floating dead bodies. 

As the flames commenced bursting around me, how- 
ever, and began heating me up I changed my mind, 
and thought I would try the water as most of them 
had gone down. With this resolve I went to the pilot 
house and pulling off a loose board put it under my 
arm and went to the edge of the deck. Here I found 
that the side wheel had burned off and fallen into the 
water and some timbers from above had drifted there. 
I concluded to make the jump for the water holding 
onto my board, and if I failed with it I would have a 
chance on the wheel house. I jumped into the river 
and went down (it seemed to me a half of a mile in 
the water), and when I came to the surface again my 
board was gone but I managed to catch on to the 
wheel and thu ssaved myself from drowning this time. 
I was so close to the burning boat that I had to let 
myself down in the water to keep from being burned. 
While thus situated I managed to get two pieces of 
timber together by tying them with my suspenders 
around one end and nailing a board across the other 
end with a chunk of wood ; all the time lowering 



364 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

myself into the water every few minutes to keep from 
being burned. 

When I had completed my little raft I jumped 
astride it, pushed off from the burning boat and 
floated down the stream. I had a board which served 
as an oar to guide my bark after it floated out of 
the main current. I landed on the Arkansas side of 
the river about five miles from the burning hulk. 
Soon after I left the hull burned through and went 
down, taking everything in its reach. As I was 
among the last that left the boat 1 saw 1,600 go down 
to a watery grave. Most of them made a rush for the 
water, some thinking that they could swim, and in 
that way attempted their escape, but many of them 
would catch on to each other and they went down by 
the hundreds. Under all circumstances you will find 
men ready to joke and to receive them. As I was float- 
ing down the stream I came near a man floating on a 
small piece of timber, who said: *' Say, Pard, give me 
a chew of tobacco, I feel like if I had a chew I could 
make to the shore all right." I told him I was going 
down to Memphis for a load and would give him some 
on my return, but the poor fellow never got home. I 
was picked up about eight o'clock a. m. and taken to 
the hospital at Memphis for treatment, as I was ex- 
hausted and scalded. I remained there about two 
weeks and then was sent north to our capital, where I 
was furloughed home for a few days to see my loved 
ones. 

There was a general order from the War Department 
to muster out all paroled prisoners and we were soon 
called to answer to the last red tape roll call after 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 365 

almost four years of service. The history of the 
regiment was our history. We had participated in 
its hardships, its labors, its duties and its countless 
privations. In the charge on many a battlefield we had 
borne our part. This closed our active service and prison- 
life and we could say that we had performed the duty 
that we owed to our country. 

I was discharged from the service on the 16th day of 
June, 1865, at Indianapolis, Ind., as captain of my 
company. 

I have for the last three years been unable to follow 
my trade, and am still unable to do any business. 



J. W. VANSCOYVE. 

T WAS born in Richland county, Ohio, June 27, 
^ 1836. I enlisted in the service of the United 
States in Company A, 64th Regiment Ohio Volunteer 
Infantry, at Camp Buckingham, November 30, 1861. 
I was captured at the battle of Franklin, Tenn., on 
the 30th of November, 1864, in the rear of Hood's 
Army. The next day we were searched and robbed of 
everything of value that was not taken when we were 
first captured. I had my knapsack, overcoat, two good 
blankets, and haversack taken from me. We were 
then marched back to the old fort at Columbia that 
we had destroyed. We marched from there to Chero- 
kee Station on the Memphis and Charleston Railroad. 
From there were shipped to Corinth, Miss., marching 
through to Meridian, and from there were taken to 
Andersonville prison. 



366 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

I was one of the boys that S. H. Kaudebaugh bought 
out of Andersonville. I was to give a German com- 
rade ten dollars. He was lost on the " Sultana." I 
was laying on the cabin deck, which is over the boilers, 
asleep at the time of the explosion. Part of the cabin 
and deck kitchen were blown off into the river and 
Hugh Bratton, Jo. Wagonner and myself and, I think, 
Kennedy, were blown into the river. I was stunned 
so that I did not realize anything. When I came to 
I was under the water. I swam around until I found 
a board about four feet long and about one-half foot 
wide, and floated down within four hundred yards of 
Memphis when I was picked up by some parties in a 
skiff. I was scarcely out of the water until I was 
entirely helpless, the parties who picked me up said 
they never expected I would revive. I had no cloth- 
ing on except shirt and drawers when rescued. At 
the time of the explosion I was jammed in my breast, 
which caused me to spit blood for several days. I 
was taken to the Gayoso Hospital, where I remained but 
a few days and was then sent to " Camp Chase," 
Ohio, to be discharged from the service. 

My occupation is that of a real estate agent. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 



367 




ALONZO A. VAN VLACK. 

T WAS born in Reading, Mich., on the 8th of October, 
^ 1843. I enlisted in the service of the United States 
on August 5, 18^)2, at Woodbridge, in Company F of 
the 18th Michigan Volunteer Infantry. I was taken 
prisoner near Athens, Ala., on the 24th of September, 
1864, by Gen. Forrest's cavalry, and was sent from 
Athens to Cahaba prison, where I suffered everything 
but death. My legs were one raw sore from my knees 
down to my feet, with scurvy. 

In March we left for Vicksburg, Miss., and after re- 
maining there until the 25th of April, 1865, we were 
placed on board the steamer *^ Sultana." We were all 



368 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

happy with the thought of soon seeing our loved ones 
at home ; but at the dead hour of midnight, when all 
or nearly all were soundly sleeping on her broad decks, 
one of her boilers exploded. (Nearly 1,700 were lost.) 
I was sleeping on the hurricane deck just forward of 
the wheelhouse and was knocked senseless by a piece 
of the deck falling on me. 

After I came to, a terrible sight met my eyes. The 
boat was all in flames and the water was covered with 
men. My first thought was to get a door out of the 
cabin. I looked down into the cabin and there saw 
women and children running to and fro and screaming 
for help. I shouted to them that they would try and 
run the boat on shore but there was so much confusion 
that they could not hear me. At last I got a barrel 
but soon threw it away as I thought that would be a 
poor thing to use in the water. I then slid down on 
one of the posts back of the wheel, stood on the 
lattice work and took off my clothes except shirt, 
drawers and stockings. Then I watched my chance to 
jump into the river. When all looked clear I leaped 
in and soon came to the surface and struck out for the 
Tennessee shore. I saw some drown so close to me 
that I could place my hand upon their heads as they 
were going down. 

While in the water I found a bale of hay with three 
or four men hanging on to it. As I made up to them 
they fought me off, but I clinched on and rested for a 
moment and then left them. I had gone about one- 
half of a mile from the boat when I found a small 
board (painted white on one side) which helped me to 
get to the shore. I got quite near the Tennessee shore 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 369 

but a strong current set in and took me farther from 
the shore. I got tangled in some grape vines that 
were floating in the river and came near sinking. I 
managed to get out of the vines, then the current 
carried me nearer the Arkansas shore. I could look 
back and see that the boat was in flames and see the 
fire drive those left on board off by the hundreds. 
When it was getting daylight I struck a snag about 
ten rods from the timber and flood-wood. I rested a 
little then swam for the flood-wood. The water came 
near drawing me under I was so weak. I crawled up 
on the logs nearly dead. I then looked back and saw 
men drowning and calling for help. 

After daylight steamers came up the river and 
picked us up. I was taken to the hospital at Memphis, 
where I was doctored and clothed, and when able to 
travel was sent with others to '^ Camp Chase," Ohio. 
The Michigan men were then sent to Jackson, Mich., 
and from there we went home on furlough. Was 
afterwards ordered to Detroit, where I was discharged 
from the service on the 1st of July, 1865, as a private. 

My present occupation is farming. Postoffice ad- 
dress, Cambria, Mich. 



ALBERT VARNELL. 

T WAS born at Knoxville, Tenn., on the 5th of March, 
^ 1839. I enlisted in the service of the United 
States at Nashville, Tenn., September 25, 1863, as a 
corporal in Company I, 3rd Kegiment Tennessee 
Cavalry. I was taken prisoner at the battle of Sulphur 
47 



370 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

Branch Trestle, Ala., on the 25th of September, 1864, 
and taken to Oahaba prison, where I was held as a 
prisoner for six months and seven days. While here I 
had to stand in water up to my waist for seven days 
and nights. From here we were taken to Big Black 
river where we were exchanged. I remained some 
time at this place. 

I boarded the "Sultana" at Vicksburg, Miss., with 
about 2,350 other soldiers who were on their way to 
Cairo, 111. The boat blew up about eight miles above 
Memphis, Tenn. The boiler burst about three o'clock 
in the morning of the 27th of April, 1865. The scene 
was horrible to look upon. I was slumbering on the 
deck when a terrible shock awoke me and I found 
myself in the hull of the boat. I then crawled out 
and saw such great excitement that it seemed to me 
there was no hope of escape for me, but I made up 
my mind to save myself if I could. I then got hold of 
a piece of plank and looked for some chance to get 
through the drowning mass. At length I saw the way 
open and struck out for the Arkansas shore. I swam 
something near seven miles before I could find timber 
of any kind on which I might rest. Finally I found a 
log about a mile above Memphis and crawling upon it 
remained there until daylight, when I was taken 
off by a boat to the Soldiers' Home at Memphis. 
While there I was unconscious two or three days, and 
when I came to myself I found that the left side of 
my face was scalded so as to put out my eye, or nearly 
so. From here I was taken to '^Camp Chase," Ohio, 
and thence to Nashville, Tenn., where I was dis- 
pharged from the service of the United States. 



LOSS OF THE SULTAlfA. 371 



C. W. WATTS. 

T WAS born in Coshocton county, Ohio, July 19, 1841, 
^ and enlisted in the service of the United States 
at Adamsville, on the 5th of August, 1862, in Com- 
pany E., 97th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Was captured 
at Franklin, Tenn., November 30, 1864, and confined 
in the Selma, Ala., and Andersonville prisons. 

When the explosion occurred I was blown into the 
water and got hold of a bale of hay and floated down 
the river. I was in the water a long time, and was 
finally picked up by a gunboat. Occupation, black- 
smith. Keside in Muskingum county, Ohio. 



WILLIAM WENDT. 

I WAS born in Prussia, Germany, March 11, 1844, 
^ and enlisted in the service of the United States, at 
Romeo, Mich., May 25, 1863, in Company L, 8th Regi- 
ment Michigan Cavalry, and was captured at Knox- 
ville, Tenn., November 15, 1863, and confined in the 
Pemberton Hospital and Libby, Andersonville, Millen 
and Blackshear, Ga., prisons. 

At the time of the explosion I was on the hurricane 
deck, next to the stairway leading up from the cabin 
deck. There was just room for four of us. There 
were John P. Day, Company L, 8th Regiment Michi- 
gan Cavalry, Geo. Meade, 21st Regiment Michigan 
Infantry, John Kiney, 8th Regiment Michigan Cavalry, 
and myself. I was awakened on the 27th of April, 
1865, by the water splashing over my head. Thinking 



372 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

that the boys were throwing water, I jumped up to see 
who it was, when I heard the cry of fire. Then I spoke 
to my mates and told them to get up for the boat was 
on fire, at the same time getting my clothes ready, still 
being half asleep. John Kiney got up and stepped 
backwards and fell into the river, Geo. Meade did like- 
wise, and I have never seen them since. I did not 
see John P. Day until we met in Memphis, after we 
were picked up. When I got wide awake, the boat 
was burning quite fast. I took in the situation at once. 
I was not able to swim. I started to go down to the 
cabin deck, but the stairs were gone, so I walked down 
on the wreckage towards the water's edge. There were 
some that had pieces of the deck and I tried to get on 
with them, but they were already crowded ; I got a blind 
from one of the cabin doors and went back. It seemed 
to me as though the boat was lying on its side. Just 
as I was going to let myself into the water I came in 
contact with something that seemed to be a scantling, 
and for fear the blind would be insufficient to hold me 
up, I took that also. Now came the difficulty to get 
out of the crowd, for it was very densely crowded on 
that side of the boat. I had no sooner got onto my 
blind than some one jumped onto my back, taking me 
down under the water and losing my hat, but I stuck to 
the blind and scantling ; finally got out of the crowd 
and drifted down with the current, for it was very 
strong. I had not been drifting long when I saw a 
light from a boat that was going down the river. Some 
of the boys were hailing it. I don't know whether 
any of them got on or not. I kept floating on down 
the stream until I came in contact with some limbs of 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 373 

trees. I grasped one of them and it happened to be 
very lucky for me, for the water was deep there and 
my blind and scantling shot away from me. It was 
just beginning to get light and I began to look around 
me. Many of the boys had landed here, some on drift 
wood, some on trees, and some on a little log hut close 
by me. About ten o'clock a. m. a steamer came up 
the river and picked us up. I was so benumbed that 
it rendered me helpless for awhile. They took me on 
board and carried me back to a hospital in Memphis. 
Occupation farming. Postoffice address, Capac, 
Mich. 



M. C. WHITE. 

T WAS born in Cattaraugus county, N. Y., August 8, 
^ 1846. I enlisted in the service of the United 
States in Company B, 8th Michigan Cavalry, Dec 2, 
1862, at Quincy, Branch county, Mich., and served 
until the close of the war as a private. I was sixteen 
years of age when I enlisted. I served in the East 
Tennessee campaign under Gen. Burnside,was wounded 
November 18, 1863, at the siege of Knoxville. 

Was with Gen. Sherman on the Atlanta campaign 
until September when we were ordered to Nicholas- 
ville, Ky., to recruit and get remounted. In Octo- 
ber we were ordered to Nashville, Tenn. My regi- 
ment was in the advance and met Hood in his advance 
on Nashville. I was taken prisoner by Forrest's Cav- 
alry November 24, 1864, near Mount Pleasant, Tenn., 
and was confined in a stone fort at Columbia, Tenn., 



374 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

for two or three weeks until Hood commenced his 
retreat, when we were taken south. We landed 
at Meridian, Miss., on Christmas day, and remained 
there a few days when we were sent to Cahaba, Ala., 
and confined in Castle Morgan until March, when we 
were paroled and sent to Vicksburg, Miss. I was with 
the last squad that left Cahaba prison and reached 
Vicksburg March 24, 1865. 

I remained at Vicksburg in the parole camp until I 
took passage on the ill-fated steamer ''Sultana." 
When her boilers exploded I was asleep on the 
hurricane deck, aft of the wheel-house, on the 
Arkansas side, and was not injured by the explosion. 
I thought at first a rebel battery had fired on us and 
that a shell had exploded on board. I heard the 
officers give orders that we should remain quiet for 
the boat was going ashore, but I soon saw that it was 
every man for himself. I dressed and went below. 
The scenes were heart-rending. The wounded and 
dying were begging for help, some were praying, 
others were taking Grod's name in vain, while those in 
the water would catch hold of one another and go 
down in squads. The fire was getting so hot that I 
saw I must soon be making my escape into the water. 
I was quite expert in the art of swimming and thought 
if I could get away from the crowd I might save 
myself, although I was quite weak through having 
been sick a great deal of the time while in prison. 

As I stopped to take a hurried glance around me I 
heard some one near me exclaim, *'For God's sake 
some one help me get this man out." I turned and 
saw a lieutenant of a Kentucky regiment. He was a 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 375 

very large man and was called "Big Kentuck." He 
had found a man that was held fast by both feet, a 
large piece of the wreck having fallen across them. I 
took hold and helped the lieutenant but we could not 
release him and he was soon roasted by the intense 
heat. I then went to the edge of the boat, removed 
my shoes and pulled my cap down, and then gave a 
plunge into the water with my clothes on as they 
would keep me warmer. I was very fortunate in 
making my escape through the crowd without any one 
catching hold of me and also in finding a plank, but I 
did not go far with it when a comrade grabbed it 
away from me. He was about half drowned and 
apparently crazy. The plank would have answered 
for us both if he had remained at one end. I tried 
to reason with him, but on hearing my voice he would 
keep coming for me, grabbing and yelling. He got 
almost within reach of me and I was afraid to have 
him get hold of my clothes for fear he would drown 
us both, so I left him with the plank and struck out 
without any support. It was very dark and all I could 
see was the burning steamer. I could not tell which 
way to make for land so I just floated on the water 
and let the current take me. 

When it came daylight I was going around a bend 
in the river and the current carried me towards the 
shore. I could see trees but no land, as the water had 
risen very high and overflowed its banks. I thought 
my only chance was to get to those trees. I was very 
cold and nearly exhausted. When I got there the first 
tree I came to the water was up to the branches. I 
threw my arms over a limb and had just strength 



376 LOSS OF THE SULTAITA. 

enough to hang on to it. It was some time before I 
could climb up out of the water. I found that I had 
gone down the river six miles and landed on the 
Arkansas side. As it grew light I could see comrades 
all around me, some in trees, some in drift-wood and 
most all were destitute of any clothing, and to make it 
still worse the gnats were so thick that they nearly ate 
us up. Then I was glad that I kept on my clothes, for a 
good many chilled to death after getting out of the 
water before they were picked up by any of the boats. 
I was picked up by the steamer '* Silver Spray," after 
remaining in the tree about three hours. We were 
treated kindly on the boat, bed clothing being taken 
from the state rooms and given to the boys to wrap 
around them. We soon landed at Memphis, at which 
place the excitement was intense, and it seemed to me 
as if every one in the city was down to the wharf and 
nearly every hack, in charge of a soldier, backed down 
to the wharf-boat ready to take us to the hospital as 
fast as we were landed. 

As we stepped from the gang plank into the wharf- 
boat the first to greet us were the Sisters of Charity 
(women of the Christian Commission). God bless them! 
They handed each of us a red woolen shirt and drawers, 
and as fast as we donned our red suits we stepped into 
a carriage and were driven rapidly to the hospital, 
where all was done for us that could be to make us 
comfortable. 

After remaining in Memphis a short time I was 
taken to ''Camp Chase," Ohio, where I remained 
about two weeks. From there I went to Jackson, 
Mich., where I received a furlough and went home on 



LOSS OF THE SULTAN-A. 377 

the 9th of Junp, 1865. I reported at Detroit and 
received an honorable discharge. 

There were four of us that slept together on the boat 
that night: Henry Narton, Charles Seabury, Truman 
Smith, and myself, all of my company. We all 
escaped but Narton (poor boy). He was lost. He 
had been my companion and bunkmate all through 
our service for the United States and I felt his loss 
next to that of a brother. 

My occupation is farming. 



NATHAN S. WILLIAMS. 

I ENLISTED in the service of the United States in 
* the State of Indiana, in Company B of the 5th 
Indiana Cavalry (the 90th Regiment). 

I was captured near Macon, Ga., the 31st of July, 
1864, together with about 500 of the command. We 
were taken to Andersonville prison. We arrived there 
on the 2nd day of August, 1864, and remained there 
until the spring of 1865, when I was sent to Vicks- 
burg, Miss. 

I remained at Vicksburg until sent on board the 
steamer *' Sultana," April 25, 1865. We started up the 
river and got along without any trouble as far as Mem- 
phis, Tenn. There we went ashore for a few hours and 
got some refreshments. At the ringing of the 
bell we all went on board the boat again. The boat 
moved up the river a fhort distance to some coal 
barges so as to take on some coal. At this place I 
laid down and soon fell asleep and did not [awake 



378 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

until the explosion took place. I received no inju- 
ries from the explosion although the upper deck fell 
upon me. I got out from under it safe. 

I went forward and caught hold of one of the ropes 
which was fastened to the bow of the boat ; there I be- 
held a sight that I never want to be a witness of again. 
Men were scalded and burned, some with legs 
and arms off, and it seemed as if some were coming 
out of the fire and from under the boiler, and many 
of them jumping into the river and drowning by 
squads. I helped throw out the large stage plank and 
intended to get on it myself, but so many men jumped 
on it I saw that it would not do for me to jump off 
then. I helped throw off everything that was loose, 
letting the men go as fast as they wanted to, for many 
would not listen to reason. 

In a short time the way was made clear. All the 
fear I had was that some drowning man would grab me 
and drown us both, and also the danger of my limbs 
cramping and letting me down. But it was not long 
until I knew I must go, for the fire was getting head- 
way and the boat was swinging around which would 
bring the heat from the fire near me. I succeeded in 
getting a plank eight feet long and eight inches wide. 
I held it a short time thinking what was best to do. I 
soon made up my mind that I could swim better with 
my clothes off, so off they came. Then I threw the 
plank into the water and jumped in after it and 
struck out for what I thought was the timber on the 
Tennessee shore, but the current took me down faster 
than I could go up stream, and what I had thought 
was the main land was the island. The main land 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 379 

looked so far ofP when I looked back, and from the 
light of the burning boat I could see land nearer on 
the opposite shore, so I turned and took down stream 
never trying to swim fast only when I would get near 
some men who would try to get my plank. When 
these men would come near me I would tell them that 
two could not be saved on a plank the size of the one 
I had and for them to keep the one they had and fol- 
low me and we would get out safely; but no one got 
out where I did, some landing above and some below. 
I reached the shore about daylight but could not 
wade, the water being over my head at that place, but 
I found a log as I w^as swimming among the timbers 
that was fastened to a stump. I crawled up on it and 
sat there rubbing myself until I was dry and warmer 
and had got the blood to circulate more rapidly. At 
sunrise a man came to me in a small dugout or canoe 
and took me to a steamboat that was picking up men 
below and some that were in the river. Those on the 
boat were very kind to mo, assisting me onto the boat 
and giving me a place near the fire and a long tailed coat 
to put on. The boat soon rounded aad we came to 
the wharf at Memphis. The sight there was most ter- 
rible. The bodies of the dying, wounded and scalded 
were to be seen on every hand. A lady gave me a shirt 
and a pair of drawers. After I put them on my 
strength was exhausted and I was carried to an ambu- 
lance and taken to the Soldiers' Home. Eesting there 
a short time, and getting some coffee to drink, I got up 
and went down stairs and wrote a letter home. I then 
started out in the street for the hospital to see how 
many of my company I could find. (I must have made 



380 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

a fine show with nothing on but a shirt and drawers, 
bareheaded and bare footed.) I did not go very far 
in this manner before a clothier called me in and gave 
me a fair suit of clothes. I then went on but did not 
find many of my company; most of them were lost in 
the deep waters of the Mississippi or had been con- 
sumed by the flames. 

As I have before said I received no injuries from the 
explosion, but resting so long on the plank caused a 
double hernia, thus making it necessary that I should 
wear a double truss. I have been trying since 1881 to 
get a pension for this and other troubles but as yet have 
not succeeded. 



WILLIAM H. WILLIAMS. 

T WAS born in Moscow, Mich., December 4, 1842, 
^ and enlisted in the service of the United States at 
Moscow, August 15, 1862, in Company F, 18th Regi- 
ment Michigan Volunteer Infantry. Was captured at 
Athens, Ala., September 24, 1864, hustled across the 
country to Cherokee Station, there put on board some 
cattle cars and taken to Corinth, Miss. From there 
was taken to Meridian, thence to Selma, Ala., and 
then down the river to Cahaba. Was kept there until 
about the 10th of April on corn meal, ground cob and 
all. We were robbed of everything we had that was 
good for anything. From Cahaba we were taken to 
Meridian and from there to Jackson, Miss., and so on 
through Big Black river, in the rear of Vicksburg. 
I think it was about the 25th of April, 1865, that we 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 381 

crowded aboard the ill-fated "Sultana" and started up 
the river for "home, sweet home," but through some 
carelessness or devilishness many poor comrades were 
destined never to see their homes On the 28th (27th) 
the boat exploded one of her boilers, caught fire and 
about 1,800 poor souls were launched into eternity and 
many a comrade's hopes were blasted. I for one was 
lucky and landed in the top of a cottonwood tree. 
At daybreak some "Johnnies" came and got me in a 
dugout, took me to the Arkansas side and cared for 
me the best they could. 

My present occupation is buggy-dealer; postoffice, 
Jonesville, Mich. 



GEORGE N. YOUNG. 

T WAS born at Columbus, Ohio, February 12, 1844, 
^ and enlisted in the service of the United States at 
that place August 2, 1862, in Company A, 95th Regi- 
ment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and was captured at 
Guntown, Miss., June 10, 1864. I was confined in the 
prisons at Andersonville, Macon, Millen, Savannah, in 
the swamp at Blackshear, and Thomasville. I was on 
board the " Sultana," but as I have already written 
my experience in a book published by Dr. J. Howes I 
do not wish to give it again. 

My present occupation is a merchant and my post- 
office address, Evans, Col. 



382 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 



J. P. ZAIZER. 

I WAS born in Limaville, Stark county, Ohio, 
October 30, 1843, and enlisted in the service of 
the United States at my native place, August 12, 1862, 
in Company F, 115th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Was 
captured at Block House No. 1, North Carolina 
Eailroad, December 6, 1864, and confined in the 
Andersonville prison. 

At the time of the explosion I was lying asleep on 
the upper deck, close to the bell. The smoke-stack 
fell across it and split and one-half of it fell over,thereby 
killing Sergt. Smith, who laid by me. I jumped over- 
board and swam ashore. 

Occupation, contractor and builder; postoffice, Can- 
ton, Ohio. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 383 



OFFICIAL LIST OF EXCHANGED PRISONERS ON 
THE BOAT. 



McCutcbeon, W., private company C, 3d Indiana cavalry 

Phillips, Wm., private company (', 2d Indiana cavalry 

Young, J., private company C, 2d Indiana cavalry 

Hardin, L. D., private company D, 2d Indiana cavalry 

Lidd, L. D., private company D, 2d Indiana cavalry 

Stevens, W., private... company D, 2d Indiana cavalry 

Brown, J., private company G, 2d Indiana cavalry 

Summerville, P. S., private company K, 2d Indiana cavalry 

Dillander, J., private company C, 3d Indiana cavalry 

Keorney, M., private company C, 3d Indiana cavalry 

Congers, Wm., private company D, 3d Indiana cavalry 

Noorier, J., private company F, 3d Indiana cavalry 

Raina, Wm., private company C, 4th Indiana cavalry 

Simpkins, C. E., private company C, 4th Indiana cavalry 

Franklin, B., sergeant company F, 4th Indiana cavalry 

Trumball, A., sergeant company F, 4th Indiana cavalry 

Evermore, N. D., private company F, 4th Indiana cavalry 

Grubbs, Isaac, private company A, 5th Indiana cavalry 

Williams, N. S., private company B, 5th Indiana cavalry 

Dean, J. D., sergeant company C, 5th Indiana cavalry 

Milott, R. A., corporal company D, 5th Indiana cavalry 

Thevin, A., corporal company E, 5th Indiana cavalry 

McCuUough, S A., private company H, 5th Indiana cavalry 

Evans, D. W., private company L, 5th Indiana cavalry 

McBride, G., private company L, 5th Indiana cavalry 

Mullen, J., private company L, 5th Indiana cavalry 

Richardson, A., private company L, 5th Indiana cavalry 

Scott, L., private company L, 5th Indiana cavalry 

Applegate, J. S , private company C, 6th Indiana cavalry 

Porterfield, W., private company C, 6th Indiana cavalry 

O'Brien, P., private company D, 6th Indiana cavalry 

Scole, R., private company D, 6th Indiana cavalry 

Lee, E. C, private company E, 6th Indiana cavalry 

Hobi, A. P., sergeant company F, 6th Indiana cavalry 

Shal, F., private company G, 6th Indiana cavalry 

Note.— There may be some errors in the spelling of a few names, but 
these are according to the official record. The same is true with regard 
to company and regiment. 



384 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

Davis, J. W., private company I, 6th Indiana cavalry 

Rood, J., private company K, 6th Indiana cavalry 

Clearly, C. D., sergeant company L, 6th Indiana cavalry 

Gathman, J. H., private company C, 7th Indiana cavalry 

Hall, J. F., private company C, 7th Indiana cavalry 

Nemier, Jas., private company C, 7th Indiana cavalry 

Rowe, D. B., private company C, 7th Indiana cavalry 

Sholey, P., private company O, 7th Indiana cavalry 

Farrell, Jno., private company D, 7th Indiana cavalry 

Frederick, G., private — company D, 7th Indiana cavalry 

Ames, S. P., private company E, 7th Indiana cavalry 

Brocklon, J., private company E, 7th Indiana cavalry 

Dany, B., private company E, 7th Indiana cavalry 

Hachsell, J. L., private company E, 7th Indiana cavalry 

Porter, C, private company E, 7th Indiana cavalry 

Corlin, W. S., private company G, 7th Indiana cavalry 

Nichols, C, private company G, 7th Indiana cavalry 

Armstrong, B. B., private company^ I, 7th Indiana cavalry 

Barrack, W., private company I, 7th Indiana cavalry 

Swords, E., private company I, 7ih Indiana cavalry 

Elkin, P. M., private company K, 7th Indiana cavalry 

Gard, W., private company K, 7th Indiana cavalry 

Scott, private company K, 7th Indiana cavalry 

Smith, J-, private ..company K, 7th Indiana cavalry 

Johnson, H., private company M, 7th Indiana cavalry 

McKann, A., private company M, 7th Indiana cavalry 

Thompson, private company M,7th Indiana cavalry 

Berry, W company B, 8th Indiana cavalry 

Markabee, W., private company B, 8th Indiana cavalry 

Millhen, E., private company C, 8th Indiana cavalry 

Stiles, J. W., corporal company F, 8th Indiana cavalry 

Fry, A., private company F, 8th Indiana cavalry 

Talbrook, R., private company H, 8th Indiana cavalry 

Madduy, private company H, 8th Indiana cavalry 

Demise, Thos., private company I, 8th Indiana cavalry 

Smith, C, private company M, 8th Indiana cavalry 

Curtis, Daniel, sergeant company A, 9th Indiana cavalry 

Spades, Jacob, sergeant company A. 9th Indiana cavalry 

Day, E. R., corporal company A, 9th Indiana cavalry 

Day, Pat, private company A, 9th Indiana cavalry 

Evans, Chas., private - company A, 9th Indiana 

Paul, A. H., private company A, 9th Indiana 

Riley, Wm., private company A, 9th Indiana 

Talkington, Robt., private company A, 9th Indiana 

Blessing, F., corporal company B, 9th Indiana 

Mooney, Jno., private company B, 9th Indiana 

Parmer, E. B., private company B, 9th Indiana 

Reed, W. P., private company B, 9th Indiana 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 385 



Sears, C H., private company B, 9th Indiana 

Scott, Robt., private company B, 9th Indiana 

Stewart, Jno., private company B, 9th Indiana 

Waller, P. J., private company B, 9th Indiana 

Warner, W. C, private company B, 9th Indiana 

Hawkins, A, W., corporal company C, Pth Indiana 

Kammer, Thos., private company C, 9th Indiana 

Collins, W. J., corporal company D, 9th Indiana 

Church, C. C, private company E, 9th Indiana 

Gilberth, Robt., private company E, 9th Indiana 

Lasboytox, T., private company E, 9th Indiana 

McCormack, A., private company E, 9th Indiana 

Wood, E., private company E, 9th Indiana 

Penson, Anderson, private company F, 9th Indiana 

Grraves, W. H., sergeant company G, 9th Indiana 

Rodflnch, N. Z., sergeant company G, 9th Indiana 

Abbison, H., corporal company G, 9th Indiana 

Nation, E. K., corporal company G, 9th Indiana 

Peacock, W. H., corporal company G, 9th Indiana 

Allom, J. C, private company G, 9th Indiana 

Clivinger, C. W., private company G, 9th Indiana 

Downing, Geo., * private company G, 9th Indiana 

Hoober, M. C, private company G, 9th Indiana 

Hooman, W. H., private company G, 9th Indiana 

Johnson, L., private company G, 9th Indiana 

King, C, * private company G, 9tli Indiana 

Maynard, J. M., private company G, 9th Indiana 

Reasoner, J. R., private company G, 9th Indiana 

Swain, E. H., lieutenant company G, 9th Indiana 

Thornbury, N., lieutenant company G, 9th Indiana 

Marity, W. J., sergeant company H, 9th Indiana 

Ballenger, F., private company H, 9th Indiana 

Bell, Jas., private company H, 9th Indiana 

Blake, Geo, W., private company H, 9th Indiana 

Block, Wm., private company H, 9th Indiana 

Brown, Wm., private company H, 9th Indiana 

Ghana, W. H., private company H, 9th Indiana 

Delano, G. W., private company H, 9th Indiana 

Dunham, A., private company H, 9th Indiana 

McQinnis, S. S., private company H, 9th Indiana 

Harden, W. H., private company H, 9th Inaiana 

Pratt, J., private company H, 9th Indiana 

Shul, Jno., private company H, 9th Indiana 

Stoops, H., private company H, 9th Indiana 

Hawthorn, D. F., sergeant company I, 9th Indiana 

Foldermar, B., corporal company K, 9th Indiana 

Bailey, H., private company K, 9th Indiana 

* Lost. 

49 



386 LOSS OF THE SULTAKA. 

Emmons, J. W., private company K, 9th Indiana 

Fisher, G. S., private company K, 9th Indiana 

Gaston, S. M., private company K, 9th Indiana 

Green, Seth J., private company K, 9th Indiana 

Heard, J., private company K, 9th Indiana 

Laughton, T. P., private company K, 9th Indiana 

Lewis, Jno. B., private company K, 9th Indiana 

Masler, P., private company K, 9th Indiana 

Newton, H. 0„ private company K, 9th Indiana 

Rea, W. T., private company K, 9th Indiana 

Sawant, J., private .company K, 9th Indiana 

Shenler, T. D., private company ^^, 9th Indiana 

Shockly, G. H., private company K, 9th Indiana 

Stevens, D., private company K, 9th Indiapa 

Stocker, Jas., private company K, 9th Indiana 

Winterhost, J., private company K, 9th Indiana 

Zix, M., private company K, 9th Indiana 

Boner, Jno., sergeant ..company L, 9th Indiana 

Woorhouse, R. A., sergeant company L, 9th Indiana 

Grevell, N. E., corporal company L, 9th Indiana 

Alexander, J. D., private company L, 9th Indiana 

McCartney, L., private company L, 9th Indiana 

Christian, J. L., private company L, 9th Indiana 

Doggy, G. W., private company L, 9Lh Indiana 

Isentredge, J. M., private company L, 9th Indiana 

Johnston, J. F., private company L, 9th Indiana 

Johnston, W. F., private company L, 9tli Indiana 

Kelly, S., private company L, !>th Indiana 

Miller, Elias, private company L, 9th Indiana 

Molway, C, private company L, 9th Indiana 

Ring, S., private company L, 9th Indiana 

Smith, L., private company L, 9th Indiana 

Spacy, O. F., private company L, 9th Indiana 

Windsor, W. H., private company L, 9th Indiana 

Gaskill, David, sergeant company M, 9th Indiana 

Armstrong, J., corporal company M, 9th Indiana 

Bragg, W., corporal company M, 9th Indiana 

Hoffman, W. H„ private company M, 9th Indiana 

Ridley, F., private company M, 9th Indiana 

Watson, J., private company M, 9th Indiana 

Baker, O., private company M, 9th Indiana 

Jolly, B. B„ sergeant major 10th Indiana cavalry 

Crawford, E. T., hospital steward 10th Indiana cavalry 

Dixon, W. F., lieutenant company A, 10th Indiana cavalry 

Bedman, J., corporal company A, 10th Indiana cavalry 

Barlow, J., private company A, 10th Indiana cavalry 

Reives, Thos. B., lieutenant company C. 10th Indiana cavalry 

Smith, W. B., corporal company C, 10th Indiana cavalry 



LOSS OF THE SULTAKA. 387 



Farrell, M., sergeant company D, 10th Indiana cavalry 

Graham, J., private company G, 10th Indiana 

McKenzie, J., private.. company G, 10th Indiana 

McLelland, J., private company G, 10th Indiana 

Kelly, G. W., private company H, 10th Indiana 

Sanford, G. W., private company H, 10th Indiana 

Bindle, R., private company H, 10th Indiana 

Twigg, A. G., lieutenant company K, 10th Indiana cavalry 

Mills, C W., sergeant company K, 10th Indiana cavalry 

Jones, J. T., private company K, 10th Indiana cavalry 

Gaffney, M., captain company L, 10th Indiana cavalry 

Crawler, Jacob, private company L, 10th Indiana cavalry 

Long, Henry M., private company E, llth Indiana 

Morgan, F., private company F, llth Indiana 

Keeler, L. L., sergeant company H, llth Indiana 

Clansville, G., private company F, 12th Indiana 

Kline, Henry, private company G, 12th Indiana 

Mitchell, J., private compasiy A, 13th Indiana cavalry 

Sutton, W., private company A, I3th Indiana cavalry 

Baker, M. T., * private company B, 13th Indiana cavalry 

Brother, H., private company G, 13th Indiana cavalry 

Holmes, W., private company G, 13th Indiana cavalry 

Owens, M. J., sergeant ...company I, 13th Indiana cavalry 

Whitesoll, J., private company K, 13th Indiana cavalry 

Johnson, T. B., private company D, 13th Indiana cavalry 

Lahue, C. J., private company D, 13th Indiana cavalry 

Wadford, W., private company M, 13th Indiana cavalry 

Lewis, Wm , private company E, 16th Indiana 

Thahbonger, J. W., private company A, 17th Indiana 

Stockman, B., private company G, 17th Indiana 

Evens, G., private company G, 17th Indiana 

Sampson, B. H., corporal company I, 17th Indiana 

Fan tinger, J. H., private company I, 17th Indiana 

Caup, M. v., private company H, 20th Indiana 

Ashley, Y. K 20th Indiana 

Patrick, M., private company H, 32d Indiana 

Smith, E. J., private company D, 23d Indiana 

Conner, Wm., private 24th Indiana 

Vesser, Sam., private company K, 26th Indiana 

Hershe, W. B., private company A, 29th Indiana 

Brown, J., sergeant company C, 29th Indiana 

Aldfant, S. M., private company D, 30th Indiana infantry 

Morris, S., private company D, 30th Indiana infantry 

Dawson, G. W., private company G, 30th Indiana infantry 

Beard, O. S., private company I, 31st Indiana infantry 

Huber, E., private company A, 32d Indiana infantry 

Shoemaker, P., private company B, 32d Indiana infantry 

* Killed. " 



388 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

Shemire, L., private company K, 32d Indiana infantry 

Rass, C. P., private company A, 34th Indiana infantry 

Tanam, M. O., sergeant company B, 35th Indiana infantry 

Linch, Thos., private company B, 35th Indiana infantry 

Donald, E. 0., private company D, 35th Indiana infantry 

Mulvany, P., private company D, 35th Indiana infantry 

Crnm, A. H., private company G, 35th Indiana infantry 

McQuire, M., private company G, 35th Indiana infantry 

Martin, J., corporal company K, 35th Indiana infantry 

Beal, W., private company B, 36th Indiana infantry 

Janey, J. R., private company B, 36th Indiana infantry 

Pike, L. , sergeant company G, 37th Indiana infantry 

Taylor, S. A., corporal company G, 37th Indiana infantry 

Cleveland, N., private company A, 38th Indiana infantry 

Kelum, Martin, private company D, 38th Indiana Infantry 

Nash, Thos., private company H, 38th Indiana infantry 

Slatting, J. W. H., private company H, 38th Indiana infantry 

Monsort, R., corporal company A, 40th Indiana infantry 

Thorn, T. J., private company A, 40th Indiana infantry 

Howard, Jno., * private company C, 40th Indiana infantry 

Westh, Jno., private company C, 40th Indiana infantry 

Kent, G. A., sergeant company D, 40th Indiana 

Nisley, C. M., sergeant company D, 40th Indiana 

Coleman, W. L., private company D, 40th Indiana 

Guear, Stephen, private company F, 40th Indiana 

Hiner, S. C, corporal company G, 40th Indiana 

Carr, J. M., private company G, 40th Indiana 

May, Clias., t private company G, 40th Indiana 

Thompson, Jno., t private company G, 40th Indiana 

Cook, W. A., private company H, 40th Indiana 

Jackson, Jas. H., private company H, 40th Indiana 

Meyer, J., private company H, 40th Indiana 

Ellenberger, J. M., private company I, 40th Indiana 

Sloan, D. W., private company I, 40th Indiana 

Hall, H., private company K, 40th Indiana 

Haspilk, H. L., private company K, 40th Indiana 

Smith, J., corporal company A, 42d Indiana 

McFarland, W., private company A, 43d Indiana 

Crabs, J., private company C, 47th Indiana 

Goers, W., private company C, 47th Indiana 

Marim, Wm., private company C, 47th Indiana 

Stendevant, T., private company D, 53d Indiana 

Versey, J., private company D, 53d Indiana 

Fletcher, J. M., corporal company A, 57th Indiana 

Yekk, J. A., private company B, 57th Indiana 

Bealer, G. W., private company C, 57th Indiana 

Lamb, M., private company C. 57th Indiana 

* Killed. + Lost. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 389 

May, J. T., private company C, 57th Indiana 

Newborn, E., private company C, 57th Indiana 

Smith, A., private company C, 57th Indiana 

Kibbee, J. H., private company D, 57th Indiana 

Van Magg, I., private company D, 57th Indiana 

Ginn, J. J., private company F, 57th Indiana 

Morrell, O. O., private company H, 57th Indiana 

Smith, F. J., private company H, 57th Indiana 

Hackinsberg, A., private company I, 57th Indiana 

Norris, Daniel, private company I, 57th Indiana 

Gardner, J. W., private company B, infantry 

Dickey, J. K., private company K, infantry 

Mulligan, T. W., sergeant company G, 72d Indiana 

Elliott, D, private company E, 75th Indiana 

Medsher, private company A, 79th Indiana 

Winkless, S., private company B, 79th Indiana 

Chapel, Isaac, private company C, 79th Indiana 

West, E., private company E, 79th Indiana 

Dixon, G., private company (\ 80th Indiana 

Hashawe, A, private company C, 80th Indiana 

Rawley, Jno., private company C, 80th Indiana 

Reynolds, M., private company C, 80th Indiana 

Runkle, M., private company C, 80fh Indiana 

Summerson, L. V., private company C, 80th Indiana 

Naler, T. H„ private company K, 84th Indiana 

Hogrlin, Jas.. sergeant company C, 84th Indiana 

Lawrence, H. K., corporal company H, 88th Indiana 

Phince, corporal company A, 89th Indiana 

Habbler, H., private company G, 91st Indiana 

Williard, C, private company E, 93d Indiana 

Lindy, Sam., private company A, 93d Indiana 

Peterson, Mat., private company A, 93d Indiana 

Penster, J., corporal company B, 93d Indiana 

Franklin, M. S., private company C, 93d Indiana infantry 

Garnett, J., private company C, 93d Indiana infantry 

Pettrits, D., private company C, 93d Indiana 

Grove, Jas., private company D, 93d Indiana 

Buchanan, Wm., private company D, P3d Indiana 

McGinnis, Jno., private company E, 93d Indiana 

Stockdale, L., private. company E, 93d Indiana infantry 

Alton, R., private company F, 93d Indiana infantry 

Gass, N. J., sergeant company fl, 93d Indiana 

Young, J., private company L, 93d Indiana 

Alexander, J. C, private company C, 98th Indiana 

Gilmore, J., private 

Higginp, E. S., private 

Cass, J. W., private company B, 99th Indiana 

Van Over, J., private company C, 99th Indiana 



390 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

Rodgers, T., private company G, 99th Indiana 

York, A. J., private company G, 99th Indiana 

Lindlay, H. C, private company I, 99tli Indiana 

Moreh, H. O., sergeant company K, 99th Indiana 

Noss, J. A., private company B, 101st Indiana 

Morter, J. A., private company C, 124th Indiana 

Pain, J., private company C, 124th Indiana 

Thompson, J. W., private company C, 124th Indiana 

Brown, Jas., private company C, 124th Indiana 

Bryant, C, private company C, 124th Indiana 

Johan, Jas, private company C, 124th Indiana 

Shinnyfield, S., private company C, 124th Indiana 

White, T. A., private company C, 124th Indiana 

Elliott, Jas., private company I, 124th Indiana 

Kimperlain, J. H., sergeant company K, 121th Indiana 

Herrington, P., private ..company K, 124th Indiana 

Palmer, R.. private company K, 124th Indiana 

Beardon, D. S., corporal 124th Indiana 

Eshy, J. M., corporal 124th Indiana 

Hickerson, J. A., corporal 124th Indiana 

Raymond, W. H., corpora] 124th Indiana 

Wriglit, J. C, corporal 124th Indiana 

Dowhar, L., private 124th Indiana 

Meher, D., musician company 1, 124th Indiana 

Cox, W, H., private company B, 1st Kentucky cavalry 

Cummings, C, private company I, 1st Kentucky cavalry 

Marshall, J. T., private company C, 2d Kentucky cavalry 

Cook, W. H. H., corporal company E, 2d Kentucky cavalry 

Hall, R. T., private company K, 2d Kentucky cavalry 

Banks, J. N., private company A, 3d Kentucky cavalry 

Marslin, F., private company B, 3d Kentucky cavalry 

Ballard, J. P., private... company F, 3d Kentucky cavalry 

Winhasher, J., private company G, 3d Kentucky cavalry 

Gray, S., private company A, 4th Kentucky cavalry 

Johnson, W., private company A, 4th Kentucky cavalry 

Royalty, D. B., private company A, 4th Kentucky cavalry 

Becde, N., private..: ..company B, 4th Kentucky cavalry 

Breckett, B., private company B, 4th Kentucky cavalry 

Foods, A. H., private company B, 4th Kentucky cavalry 

Marcum, N., private company B, 4th Kentucky cavalry 

Carey, J., sergeant company C, 4th Kentucky cavalry 

Spencer, A., sergeant company C, 4th Kentucky cavalry 

Bowland, Abner, private company C, 4th Kentucky cavalry 

Higdon, E. T., private company C, 4th Kentucky cavalry 

McQueen, A., private company D, 4th Kentucky cavalry 

Gallagher, J., private company D, 4th Kentucky cavalry 

Papers, J., private company E, 4th Kentucky cavalry 

Bower, M., private company F, 4th Kentucky cavalry 



LOSS OF THE SULTAT^^A. 



391 



Harper, E., private company G, 4th Kentucky cavalry 

Jackson, G., private company G^ 4th Kentucky cavalry 

Hogan, M., private company H, 4th Kentucky cavalry 

Holley, J. W., private company H, 4th Kentucky cavalry 

Vincent, H., private - company H, 4th Kentucky cavalry 

Redman, W., private company H, 4th Kentucky cavalry 

Curry, M., private company I, 4th Kentucky cavalry 

Galiner, James, private. company I, 4th Kentucky cavalry 

Regney, James, private company I, 4th Kentucky cavalry 

Csulter, M., private company K, 4th Kentucky cavalry 

Edwards, W. H., private company K, 4th Kentucky cavalry 

Fabrow, M. B., private company K, 4th Kentucky cavalry 

Merrell, F., private company K, 4th Kentucky cavalry 

Williams, W, T., private company K, 4th Kentucky cavalry 

Wolum, Jno., private company K, 4th Kentucky cavalry 

Collins, Wm., private company L, 4th Kentucky cavalry 

Patterson, Thos., private company L, 4th Kentucky cavalry 

Fiddler, W, N., major 5th Kentucky cavalry 

Fabers J. H., private company A, 5th Kentucky cavalry 

Wheatleigh, L., sergeant company A, 6tli Kentucky cavalry 

Bankhead, Henry, private company A, 6th Kentucky cavalry 

Hammond, Jno., private company A, 6th Kentucky cavalry 

Beam, L., private company A, 6th Kentucky cavalry 

Haup, Benj., private company A, 6th Kentucky cavalry 

McKrunney, R., private company A, 6th Kentucky cavalry 

Hartman, L., private company B, 6th Kentucky cavalry 

Lebel, G., private. company B, 6th Kentucky cavalry 

Stewart, P. A. , private company B, 6th Kentucky cavalry 

Parish, C. H., captain company C, 6th Kentucky cavalry 

Fluke, A. W., sergeant company C, 6th Kentucky cavalry 

Root, E. , sergeant company C, 6th Kentucky cavalry 

Firey, J., bugler company C, 6th Kentucky cavalry 

Buckley, Jas., private company C, 6th Kentucky cavalry 

Bartlett, C. M., private company C, 6th Kentucky cavalry 

Coleman, E., private company C, 6th Kentucky cavalry 

Elliott, W., private company C, 6th Kentucky cavah*y 

Merrit, B., private company C, 6th Kentucky cavalry 

Moprin, T., private company C, 6th Kentucky cavalry 

Paller, W., private. company C, 6th Kentucky cavalry 

Pierce, W., private company C, 6th Kentucky cavalry 

Watt, S J., private company C, 6th Kentucky cavalry 

Vanor, W. D., private company C, 6th Kentucky cavalry 

Allison, R. C, private company D, 6th Kentucky cavalry 

Cuney, C. E., private company D, 6th Kentucky cavalry 

Evansberry, H., private company E, 6th Kentucky cavalry 

Calvin, J., private company F, 6th Kentucky cavalry 

Calvin, W. L., private company F, 6th Kentucky cavalry 

Carmarcb, J., private company F, 6th Kentucky cavalry 



392 



LOSS OF THE SULTAl^A. 



Cheatham, G. H., private ..company F, 

Saber, J. J., first lieutenant company G. 

Chelf, S. D , corporal company G, 

Stherher, T. J., artiflcer company G, 

Brown, P. M., private company G, 

Davenport, Seth H., private company G, 

Jacobs, A. M., private company G. 

Jacobs, J. A., private company G, 

Hobbs, L., private company G, 

Lay, G. W., private. compxny G, 

Monday, W. H., private company G, 

Noe, H. H., private company G, 

Saddler, M , private company G, 

Stephens, T. N., private company G, 

Winstead, Jno., private company G, 

Daugherty, Thos., private. company H, 

Hoglyn, J. B., private company H, 

Thompson, J. B., private company H, 

Carter, T. A., private company A, 

Wade, Jas., private company B, 

Smith, Jas., private company D, 

Clark, M. C, sergeant company B, 

Foley, P. W„ corporal company B, 

Cook, J., private company A, 

Lewis, W., corporal.. company H, 

■ /Ps - — Phelps, J. W, private company G, 

Arnold, W. F., corporal company B, 

Miller, R., private company K, 

Johnson, A. W., private company H, 

Penticutr, Jno., private conapany A, 

Barrow, G. E., private company D, 

Wallace, F., private company D, 

Elmor, R., private company G, 

Raysor, W., private company H, 

Hope, F. W., private company A, 

Gillman, H., private company C, 

Humphreys, B., private company H, 

Webster, P., private company E, 

Kennedy, E. R., private company K, 

Baxon, Jno , private company B, 

Hagart, W., private company A, 

Coyton, W. A., private coTipany B, 

Davis, B G , private company L, 

Smith, J., private company G, 

dinger, C, corporal company E, 

Wilson, H. B., corporal company E, 

Emerick, J., private company L, 

Smith, C , private company D, 



6th Kentucky cavalry 
6th Kentucky cavalry 
6th Kentucky cavalry 
6th Kentucky cavalry 
6th Kentucky cavalry 
6th Kentucky cavalry 
6th Kentucky cavalry 
6th Kentucky cavalry 
6th Kentucky cavalry 
6th Kentucky cavalry 
6th Kentucky cavalry 
6th Kentucky cavalry 
6th Kentucky cavalry 
6th Kentucky cavalry 
6th Kentucky cavalry 
6th Kentucky cavalry 
6th Kentucky cavalry 
Gth Kentucky cavalry 
17th Kentucky cavalry 
27Th Kentucky cavalry 
27th'Kentucky cavalry 
28th Kentucky cavalry 
28th Kentucky cavalry 
Ist Kentucky artillery 
1st Kentucky artillery 
4th Kentucky mt'd. Inf 
1st Kentucky infantry 
1st Kentucky infantry 
2d Kentucky infantry 
3d Kentucky infantry 
3d Kentucky infantry 
3d Kentucky infantry 
3d Kentucky infantry 
3d Kentucky infantry 
4th Kentucky infantry 
4th Kentucky infantry 
4th Kentucky infantry 
4th Kentucky infantry 
4th Kentucky infantry 
5th Kentucky infantry 
7th Kentucky cavalry 
7th Kentucky cavalry 
7th Kentucky cavalry 
nth Kentucky infantry 
16th Kentucky infantry 
16th Kentucky infantry 
18th Kentucky infantry 
27th Kentucky infaotry 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 



393 



Neller, Peter, private company C, 28th Kentucky infantry 

Colwell, H. C, private company D, 37th Kentucky infantry 

Free, M. C, private company M, 1st Michigan cavalry 

Watson, J. H., private company M, 1st Michigan cavalry 

Paelps, F., private company M, Ist Michigan cavalry 

Dickerson, Simeon, lieutenant 2d Michigan cavalry 

Maxon, M., sergeant company A, 2d Michigan cavalry 

Alfred, Z., private company A, 2d Michigan cavalry 

Johnson, B., private company A, 2d Michigan cavalry 

Tubbs, Hiram, private company B, 2d Michigan cavalry 

Brooks, L., sergeant company C, 2d Michigan cavalry 

Robinson, J. L., private company C, 2d Michigan cavalry 

Corliss, J. L., private company C, 2d Michigan cavalry 

Dillard, James, private company C, 2d Michigan cavalry 

Gleason, G. G., private company D, 2d Michigan cavalry 

Johnson, J., private company D, 2d Michigan cavalry 

Hill, Daniel, private company D, 2d Michigan cavalry 

Dickens, L. F., lieutenant company E, 2d Michigan cavalry 

Perkins, F. M., sergeant company E, 2d Michigan cavalry 

Petitt, M., corporal company E, 2d Michigan cavalry 

Warren, D , private company E, 2d Michigan cavalry 

Nolen, D., private company E, 2d Michigan cavalry 

Munroe, F., private company E, 2d Michigan cavalry 

Scadding, J., private company E, 2d Michigan cavalry 

Alney, John, private company E, 2d Michigan cavalry 

Draiman, McKenzie, private . compa-^y E, 2d Michigan cavalry 

Thomas, J. P., private company E, 2d Michigan cavalry 

Kendric, J., private company E, 2d Michigan cavalry 

Langley, W., private company E, 2d Michigan cavalry 

Lindsay, W. L., private company E, 2d Michigan cavalry 

Byron, Joseph, private company E, 2d Michigan cavalry 

Rix, A., private company G, 2d Michigan cavalry 

Worden, D. C, bugler company H, 2d Michigan cavalry 

Holler, R., private company H, 2d Michigan cavalry 

Mahony, J., corporal company 1, 2d Michigan cavalry 

Gage, G., private company I, 2d Michigan cavalry 

Barker, F., private company K, 2d Michigan cavalry 

Stranton, L., private company K, 2d Michigan cavalry 

Cormstead, — , private company K, 2d Michigan cavalry 

Laybarker, P., corporal company L, 2d Micliigan cavalry 

Ranks, F., private company D, 3d Michigan cavalry 

Thompson, M., private company I, 3d Michigan cavalry 

Baker, M. S., corporal company D, 4th Michigan cavalry 

Blakely, J., private company E, 4th Michigan cavalry 

Eslich, N. A., private company G, 4th Michigan cavalry 

Davenhafl, J. C, private company I, 4th Michigan cavalry 

Fordend, L. D., private company I, 4th Michigan cavalry 

Norton, J. E., private. .... — ^ company A, 5th Michigan cavalry 



394 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 



Finch, Wm., private company D, 

Warren, H., sergeant company G, 

Russell, A., private company G, 

Cehart, J. L., sergeant company H, 

Brown, J. W., private company H, 

Bussley, * L., private company M, 

Barnes, A. M., private company D, 

Pick, C, private company E, 

Morse, V. H., private company E, 

Hart, T., private... company I, 

Hulett, J , private company K, 

McNeal, B., private company H, 

Zacliary, A. K., sergeant company K, 

Noble, John, private company B, 

Lebrey, C. J., private company B, 

Fast, L. R., private company B, 

Glum, T. P. sergeant company C, 

Fitzgerald, ,W., private company C 

Snyder, H., private company C, 

Vent, W., private- company C, 

Duberry, A., private company D, 

Wells, H. C, sergeant company E, 

Geer, C B., private company F, 

Warls, B., private company G, 

Lubustacker, private company G, 

Meeker, Clark, private company H, 

Smith, Freeman, private company H, 

Snider, T., private company H, 

Spencer, E., private company H, 

Burlingham, E. J., private company I, 

Carey, O., private company I, 

Cartwright, private company I, 

Farrer, John, private company K, 

Day, J. P., corporal company L, 

Broadshaw, D., private company M, 

Zacharia, M., private company M, 

Patterson, W. J., I'-t lieutenant company E, 

Wells, D. A., private company E, 

Green, A„ private company K, 

Royal, L. S., private company K, 

Hatch, A. W., corporal company F, 

Bremer, J. L., sergeant company L, 

Earl, J., lieutenant company L, 

Johnson, H., private company L, 

Decker, J. R., private company L, 

Stephens, J. A., sergeant company B, 

Shephard S., private company D, 

* Scalded to death by my side.— C. D. B. 



5th Michigan cavalry 
5th Michigan cavalry 
5th Michigan cavalry 
5th Michigan cavalry 
5th Michigan cavalry 
5th Michigan cavalry 
6th Michigan cavalry 
6th Michigan cavalry 
6th Michigan cavalry 
6th Michigan cavalry 
6th Michigan cavalry 
7th Michigan cavalry 
7th Michigan cavalry 
8th Michigan cavalry 
8th Michigan cavalry 
8th Michigan cavalry 
8th Michigan cavalry 
, 8th Michigan cavalry 
8th Michigan cavalry 
8th Michigan cavalry 
8th Michigan cavalry 
8th Michigan cavalry 
8th Michigan cavalry 
8th Michigan cavalry 
8th Michigan cavalry 
8th Michigan cavalry 
8th Michigan cavalry 
8th Michigan cavalry 
8th Michigan cavalry 
8th Michigan cavalry 
8th Michigan cavalry 
8th Michigan cavalry 
8th Michigan cavalry 
8th Michigan cavalry 
8th Michigan cavalry 
8th Michigan cavalry 
9th Michigan cavalry 
1st Michigan S. S. 
Ist Michigan S. S. 
Ist Michigan S. S. 
1st Michigan E. & M. 
1st Michigan E. & M. 
Ist Michigan E. & M. 
1st Michigan E. & M. 
1st Michigan E. & M. 
Ist Michigan infantry 
1st Michigan infantry 



LOSS OF THE SULTAiq^A. 395 



Ives, E. H., private company D, 1st Michigan infantry 

Barr, G., private company G, Uth Michigan infantry 

Butler, J. E., private company A, 15th Michigan infantry 

Wads, A., private company A, 15th Michigan infantry 

Ducatt, T. A., corporal company E, 15th Michigan infantry 

Wright, H., private company F, 15th Michigan infantry 

Wells, W., private company H, 15th Michigan infantry 

Doane, F. R., private company B, 17th Michigan infantry 

Pechham, T. J., corporal company F, 17th Michigan infantry 

Waterhury, A. N., sergeant company H, 17th Michigan infantry 

Briggs, J. C, sergeant company K, 17th Michigan infantry 

Spring,* J., corporal company A, 18th Michigan infantry 

Knapp,* A. J., corporal company A, 18th Michigan infantry 

Bradish,* J., corporal company A, 18th Michigan infantry 

Johnson, G. J., private company A, 18th Michigan infantry 

Prosser, G. W., private company A, 18th Michigan infantry 

Donev, N., private company A, 18th Michigan infantry 

Foglesong, N., private company A, 18th Michigan infantry 

Koon, H., private company A, 18th Michigan infantry 

Myers, J. L., private company A, 18th Michigan infantry 

Robbins,* J., private company A, 18th Michigan infantry 

Rowley,* O. B,, private company A, 18th Michigan infantry 

Slick, J. L., private company A, 18th Michigan infantry 

Ludlum* E. F., private company A, 18th Michigan infantry 

Hale, O. P., private company A, 18th Michigan infantry 

Rowley,* W., private company A, 18th Michigan infantry 

Cornell, A. W., corporal company B, 18th Michigan infantry 

Aldrich, A. D., private.. company B, 18th Michigan infantry 

Darrow, S. M., private company B, 18th Michigan infantry 

Wright, F., sergeant company B, 18th Michigan infantry 

Ainsworth, J. S., private company B, 18th Michigan infantry 

Sprague, F., private company B, 18th Michigan infantry 

Horton,* C. E., sergeant company C, 18th Michigan infantry 

Greenfield,* L., sergeant company C, 18th Michigan infantry 

Baker,* J. D., 1st sergeant company C, 18th Michigan infantry 

Moore,* J., corporal company C, 18th Michigan infantry 

Thayer, Wm., private company C, 18th Michigan infantry 

Oakley,* E. J., private company C, 18th Michigan infantry 

Zidler,*F., private company C, 18th Michigan infantry 

Deline,* O., private company C, 18th Michigan infantry 

Daly, M., private company C, 18th Michigan infantry 

Southwick,* E., private company C, 18th Michigan infantry 

Hayek, G. P., private company C, 18th Michigan infantry 

Parker,* J., private company C, 18th Michigan infantry 

Potter,* J. B., private company C, 18th Michigan infantry 

Finch, W. H., sergeant company D, 18th Michigan infantry 

Lawrence,* Albert W., sergeant- -company D, 18th Michigan infantry 

* Killed. 



396 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

Wood, H. C, corporal company D, 18tli Michigan infantry 

Ford,* E., corporal company D, 18th Michigan infantry 

Young,* W., musician company D, 18th Michigan infantry 

Mann, W., private company D, 18th Michigan infantry 

Nelson, L., private company D, 18th Michigan infantry 

Crisp, Wm , private company D, 18th Michigan infantry 

Norcutt, J. W., private company D, 18th Michigan infantry 

Duesler, Geo., private company D, 18th Michigan infantry 

Vancourt, J., private company D, 18th Michigan infantry 

Walkins, J., private company D, 18th Michigan infantry 

Wright, N. D., private company D, 18th Michigan infantry 

Eddy. W., private company D, 18th Michigan infantry 

Bird,* John, private company D, 18th Michigan infantry 

Robins,* Jonathan, private company D, 18th Michigan infantry 

Brewer, G. H., corporal company E, 18th Michigan infantry 

Jones, S. W., private company E, 18th Michigan infantry 

Brangan, P., private company E, 18th Michigan infantry 

Millspaugh, D„ private... company E, 18th Michigan infantry 

Barnum, J. P., private company E, 18th Michigan infantry 

Randall, A., private company E, 18th Michigan infantry 

Smith, Tho8„ private company E, 18th Michigan infantry 

Mason, G. R., * private company E, 18th Michigan Infantry 

Goodrich, U. N„ private company E, 18th Michigan infantry 

Voglesong, A. N.. t sergeant company F, 18th PTichigan infantry 

Cole, O. M., corporal company F, 18th Michigan infantry 

Stubberfleld. W., private company F, 18th Michigan infantry 

Harris, W, H., private companv F, 18th Michigan infantry 

Holmes, N. L., * private company F, 18th Michigan infantry 

Vangorder, D. W., private company F, 18th Michigan infantry 

Smith, C, private company F, 18th Michigan infantry 

Abbadusky, C, private company F, 18th Michigan infantry 

Gale, A. (Orris), * private company F, 18th Michigan infantry 

Vanvlack, A., private company F, 18th Michigan infantry 

Fuller, A., private company F, 18th Michigan infantry 

Hinep, T. F., * private company K, 18th Michigan infantry 

Hampton, F., private company G, 18th Michigan infantry 

Williams, W. H., private company F, I8th Michigan infantry 

Nevins, J. F„ private company F, 18th Michigan infantry 

Lachler, Geo.,* private company F, 18th Michigan infantry 

Palmer, G. N., * corporal company G, 18th Michigan infantry 

Faurot, W, L., corporal. company G, 18th Michigan infrntry 

Lackey, P., private company G, 18th Michigan infantry 

Hampton, P., private company G, 18th Michigan infantry 

Burns, E , private company G, 18th Michigan infantry 

Burns, M., private company G, ISth Michigan infantry 

Merrifield, E.G., private company G, 18th Michigan infantry 

Colwell, James, * private company G, 18th Michigan infantry 

♦Killed, t Since died. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 39? 

Seely, F. D.,* private company G, 18th Michigan infantry 

Plank, H. D., corporal company H, 18th Michigan infantry 

Countryman, G. A., musician company K, ISth Michigan infantry 

Haight, G. C, musician company H, 18th Michigan infantry 

Mallison, S., private company H, 18th Michigan infantry 

Fink, M. L., private company H, 18th Michigan infantry 

Snyder, D. L., private. company H, 18th Michigan infantry 

Shaffer, B. B., private company 1, 18th Michigan infantry 

Main, S. H., private company 1, 18th Michigan infantry 

Patterson, R., private company 1, 18th Michigan infantry 

Upton, W. S., private company 1, 18th Michigan infantry 

Wiechard, A. B., private company K, 18th Michigan infantry 

Sulier, L. C, private company K, 18th Michigan infantry 

Shetterson, Jno., private company K, 18th Michigan infantry 

McEldowney, A. J., * private company K, 18th Michigan infantry 

Berry, C. D., private company I, 20th Michigan infantry 

Mead, J., t private company F, SIst Michigan infantry 

Seward, R. W., private company F, 21st Michigan infantry 

Love, J. H., private company C, 22d Michigan Infantry 

Smith, A. B., sergeant company K, 22d Michigan infantry 

Boyce, E., private company K, 22d Michigan infantry 

Cole, David, private company B, 23d Michigan infantry 

Freeland, G., private company E, 23d Michigan infantry 

Ludlow, A. E., private company E, 23d Michigan infantry 

Westhorpe, Geo., private company E, 23d Michigan infantry 

Vancover, A., private company E, 33d Michigan infantry 

Harris, Israel, private company H, 24th Michigan infantry 

Luchane, D., + private company F, 25th Michigan infantry 

Bement, Geo., sergeant company F, 25th Michigan infantry 

Richardson, T. W., private company A, 1st Ohio infantry 

Banner, Thos. H., private company B, 1st Ohio infantry 

Anderson, James, private cojnpany D, 1st Ohio infantry 

Eavens, E., private company D, 1st Ohio infantry 

Hawk, M., private company D, 3d Ohio infantry 

Sorger, G., private company G, 4th Ohio infantry 

Edwards, Jacob, private company I, 4th Ohio infantry 

Lentimore, J. B., private company M, 4th Ohio infantry 

Madden, W. P., private company I, 8th Ohio infantry 

Miller, D. S., private company D, 13th Ohio infantry 

Longshon, J., private company 1, 13th Ohio infantry 

McCordy, J., private company K, 13th Ohio infantry 

Nelson, N., private _. company K, 13th Ohio infantry 

Van Fleet, H., private.. company 1, 14th Ohio infantry 

Carter, F. M., private company D, 15th Ohio infantry 

Ezzle, M., private company F, 15th Ohio infantry 

Myers, C. W., private company G, 15th Ohio infantry 

Carnes, N., sergeant company B, 18th Ohio infantry 

* Killed. t Lost. 



398 LOSS OF THE SULTAITA. 



Lampsell, H., private 11th Ohio infantry- 
White, W. A., private company H, 19th Ohio infantry 

Shirley, W. H., sergeant company B, 31st Ohio infantry 

Casbell, A., private company B, 21st Ohio infantry 

Markford, P., private company B, 21st Ohio infantry 

Morgan, Levi J., private ...company B, 21st Ohio infantry 

Usher, A., private company B, 2l8t Ohio infantry 

Engal, J., private company D, 21st Ohio infantry 

Donaphin, A., sergeant company E, 21st Ohio infantry 

Kendals, R., private company E, 2]st Ohio infantry 

Forest, F., private. company K, 21st Ohio infantry 

Davidson, John, private company A, 23d Ohio infantry 

Mershen, G., private company E, 22d Ohio infantry 

Field, G. G., corporal company D, 33d Ohio infantry 

Gray, William, private company I, 23d Ohio infantry 

Badcock, John, private. company K, 24tli Ohio infantry 

Kelly, J., private company K, 25th Ohio infantry 

Miller, J. R., corporal company D, 26th Ohio infantry 

McClutock, W. G., private company H, 26th Ohio infantry 

Shields, P., private company D, 3lst Ohio infantry 

Long, J. B., private company I, 33d Ohio infantry 

Lyman, R. J., private company I, 33d Ohio infantry 

Sheppard, W., private company E, 34th Ohio infantry 

Whyler, L., private company D, 35th Ohio infantry 

Sharp, E., private company E, 35th Ohio infantry 

Brown, A., private.. company A, 37th Ohio infantry 

Wertermier, J. D , private company B, 37th Ohio infantry 

Anderback, G., private company C, 37th Ohio infantry 

Webler, John, private company C, 37th Ohio infantry 

Cealer, C, private company D, 37th Ohio infantry 

Hysenger, J,, private company D, 37th Ohio infantry 

Hiss, John, private company E, 37th Ohio infantry 

Mathews, O., private company D, 41st Ohio infantry 

Clearley, J. R., private company F, 41st Ohio infantry 

Shadier, J., private company E, 42d Ohio infantry 

Thacker, J., private company E, 46th Ohio infantry 

Klutter, L. R., private company K, 46th Ohio infantry 

Mass, J. W., private company B, 47th Ohio infantry 

Buckleyhower, A,, private company H, 47th Ohio infantry 

Hesser, L., private company K, 47th Ohio infantry 

Gay, Asa, corporal company A, 49th Ohio infantry 

Huffey, J, private company B, 49th Ohio infantry 

Fox, John, corporal company A, 50th Ohio infantry 

Rice, M. L., private company A, 50th Ohio infantry 

Roberts, Jno., private .company A, 50th Ohio infantry 

Helllnger, J„ sergeant company B, 50th Ohio infantry 

Humphrey, W. C, private company B, 50th Ohio infantry 

Merron, William, private company B, 50th Ohio infantry 



LOSS OF THE SULTAi?"A. 



399 



Sheare, W. G., private* company 

Walker, J., private company 

Huston, D., corporal Company 

Ray, Christian, private company 

Picket, E., corporal company 

McClarey, private company 

Holmes, S., private company 

Richmond, W., private company 

Shulton, William, private company 

White, G. W., private company 

Lee, William H., sergeant company 

Ruslant, Peter, corporal company 

Vananda, R., corporal company 

Carr, John, private t company 

Krinzer, H., private company 

Meaker, F., private company 

Pettyjohn, S., private company 

Moore, T., corporal company 

Green, W., sergeant company 

Cruse, C. F., corporal- company 

Bacan, Nornear, private company 

Badgley, B. B., private company 

Boyd, George W., private company 

Cotton, W. S., private company 

Lehman, N., private company 

Station, G. W., private company 

Gilmore, S. D., private company 

Griflin, J. O., private company 

Jordan, H., private company 

Matter, F,, private company 

Murphy, C. C, private company 

Winters, E., corporal company 

Shellard, P., private company 

Culp, A. J., private company 

Phillips, W., private company 

Norris, J. B., private company 

DeMoss, J., private company 

Smith, W., private company 

Altof, E. W., private company 

Belnap, C. M., private company 

Lahr, J., private company 

Sayer, S. R., sergeant company 

Hleg, L., corporal company 

Miller, J., private company 

Gregary, W., private company 

Scan, W., private company 

Patte, W. S., private company 

* Lost. t Killed. 



50th Ohio 
50th Ohio 
50th Ohio 
50th Ohio 
50th Ohio 
50th Ohio 
50th Ohio 
50 th Ohio 
50th Ohio 
50th Ohio 
50th Ohio 
50th Ohio 
50th Ohio 
50th Ohio 
50th Ohio 
50th Ohio 
50th Ohio 
50th Ohio 
50th Ohio 
50th Ohio 
50th Ohio 
50th Ohio 
50th Ohio 
50th Ohio 
50th Ohio 
50th Ohio 
50th Ohio 
50th Ohio 
50th Ohio 
50th Ohio 
50th Ohio 
50th Ohio 
50th Ohio 
50th Ohio 
51st Ohio 
51st Ohio 
51st Ohio 
51st Ohio 
51st Ohio 
51st Ohio 
51st Ohio 
51st Ohio 
5l8t Ohio 
52d Ohio 
53d Ohio 
5ith Ohio 
54th Ohio 



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400 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

Wiles, A. G., private company C, 55th Ohio infantry 

Githorn, L., private company F, 56th Ohio infantry 

Blaire, P. Q., sergeant major 59th Ohio infantry 

Brumer, M., private company C, 59th Ohio infantry 

Brudgeman, A. A., private company F, 63d Ohio infantry 

Whoyle, L., sergeant company G, 63d Ohio infantry 

Barnes, W, private company H, 63d Ohio infantry 

Hult, W. A., corporal company A, 61th Ohio infantry 

Van Scoyte, G. W., corporal company A, 64th Ohio infantry 

Brinke, Thos., private* company A, 64th Ohio infantry 

Fise, W., sergeant company B, 64th Ohio infantry 

Cramer, A. O., sergeant company B, 64th Ohio infantry 

Barr, W., private company B, 64th Ohio infantry 

Brady, J., private company B, 64th Ohio infantry 

King, B., private company B, 64th Ohio infantry 

Zumner, C, private company B, 64th Ohio infantry 

Zimmer, C, private company B, 64th Ohio infantry 

Brenton, H. W., sergeant company D, 64th Ohio infantry 

Landon, S., corporal company D, 64tb Ohio infantry 

Carnock, T. J., corporal company E, 64th Ohio infantry 

White, R., sergeant company I, 6tth Ohio infantry 

Eddermon, D., corporal company I, 64th Ohio infantry 

McKinley, D., private company I, 64th Ohio infantry 

Stickney, J., private company I, 64th Ohio infantry 

Kennedy, Ed., private company K, 64th Ohio infantry 

Ryan, J., private company K, 64th Ohio infantry 

Gregory, E., sergeant company C, 65th Ohio infantry 

Nickerson, Chas., private company E, 65th Ohio infantry 

Grebaugh, D., private company G, 65th Ohio infantry 

Mathias, E., sergeant company K, 65th Ohio infantry 

Horner, Ira B., corporal company K, 65th Ohio infantry 

Bishler, Jno., private company K, 65th Ohio infantry 

Emerlin, Eli, private company K, 65th Ohio infantry 

Fairchild, O. W., private company K, 65th Ohio infantry 

Roddybaugh, S. H., private company K, 65th Ohio infantry 

Shoemaker, J., private company C, 70th Ohio infantry 

Black, J. O., private... coEcpany K, 70th Ohio infantry 

Davis, J. W., lieutenant company B, 71st Ohio infantry 

Brant, F., private company A, 73d Ohio infantry 

Mclntyre, B., private company B, 72d Ohio infantry 

Shoe, E., private company C, 72d Ohio infantry 

Duke, Wm., sergeant company D, 72d Ohio infantry 

Stalley, M., sergeant company D, 72d Ohio infantry 

Shoemaker, A., private company E, 72d Ohio infantry 

Shoemaker, W., private company E, 72d Ohio infantry 

Trimmer, Wm., private company E, 72d Ohio infantry 

Flint, Thos., corporal company F, 72d Ohio infantry 

*Lo8t. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 401 

Crane, J., private company F, 72d Ohio infantry 

Hague, S., private company F, 73d Oliio infantry 

Kirk, W. H.,p ivate company F, 73d Ohio infantry 

Aubrey, M., private company H, 73d Ohio infantry 

Holendesk, J., private company K, 72d Ohio infantry 

Andrews, W., sergeant company A, 75th Ohio infantry 

Barnes, Ed., private company F, 75th Ohio infantry 

Waltz, M., private company H, 75th Ohio infantry 

Thompson, J., private company A, 76th Ohio infantry 

Yeisley, E. H., private company A, 76th Ohio infantry 

McCarty, Jas., private. company D, 76th Ohio infantry 

Stone, Jas., private.. company D, 76tli Ohio infantry 

Thomas, Thos., private company H, 76th Ohio infantry 

White, Jas., private company E, 78th Ohio infantry 

Clepner, J., private... company H, 78th Ohio infantry 

Marks, Chas., private company F, 79th Oh'o infantry 

Ramme], A. W,, private company E, 80th Ohio infantry 

Shaw, C. M., private company B, 81st Ohio infantry 

Cord, A., private company F, 90th Ohio infantry 

Nihart, A., private company G, 90th Ohio infantry 

Bady, J., sergeant. company A, 93d Ohio infantry 

Sharits, Z., private company E, 93d Ohio infantry 

Young, G. H., private.. company A, 9.5th Ohio infantry 

Reed, Oliver H., private company A, 95th Ohio infantry 

McMillan, D. E, private company B, 95th Ohio infant'-y 

McMillan, D, M., private company B, 95th Ohio infantry 

Miller, P., private company E, 95th Ohio infantry 

Owen. W., private company E, 95th Ohio infantry 

Poycell, H. W., private company E, 9.5th Ohio infantry 

Poycell, W. W., private company E, 95th Ohio infantry 

Rollins, G. H., private company E, 95th Ohio infantry 

Shaul, W.R., private company E, 95th Ohio infantry 

Little, J. W., sergeant ...company F, 95th Ohio infantry 

Vanhorn, B., private company F, 95th Ohio infantry 

Jackson, T., corporal company G, 95th Ohio infantry 

Parker, J A, private company G, 95th Ohio infantry 

Lease, J. W., corporal company I, 95th Ohio infantry 

Wilcox, M.,' private company I, 95th Ohio infantry 

Wilson, R., private company I, 95th Ohio infantry 

Rush, J., private company L, 95th Ohio infantry 

Hammel, Sam., private 95th Ohio infantry 

McLeary, L., private company B, 96th Ohio infantry 

Poland, J. L., sergeant company B, 97th Ohio infantry 

Cishard, T. R., private company B, 97th Ohio infantry 

Johnson, S., private. company B, 97th Ohio infantry 

Stevens, W., private company C, 97th Ohio infantry 

Wilner, R., private company C, 97th Ohio infantry 

3, Alexander, private company D, 97th Ohio infantry 

51 



403 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 



Watts, T. W., private company E, 97th Ohio infantry 

Lakin, W. H., 2d lieutenant- company H, 97th Ohio infantry 

Emerson, J. G., private company I, 97th Ohio infantry 

Cornwell, J , * sergeant company A, 100th Ohio infantry 

McCrory, L. W., private company A, 100th Ohio infantry 

Flemming, J. A., * corporal company D, 100th Ohio infantry 

King, A. W., corporal company D, 100th Ohio infantry 

Davis, J., private company D, 100th Ohio infantry 

Hill, G., private company D, 100th Ohio infantry 

Lambert, V., * private company D, 100th Ohio infantry 

Wheeler, W., private company D, 100th Ohio infantry 

Sterknell, E. B., private company E, 100th Ohio infantry 

Hiller, R.,t sergeant company F, 100th Ohio infantry 

Wagner, J., corporal company G, 100th Ohio infantry 

Flegel, John, * corporal companj'- K, 100th Ohio infantry 

Dunume, J., private company K, 100th Ohio infantry 

Hofinal, A., * private company K, 100th Ohio infantry 

Squire, E. J., 1st lieutenant company D, 101st Ohio infantry 

Rotider, Jacol). private company H, lOlst Ohio infantry 

Faggott, H. A., private company I, 101st Ohio infantry 

Billing, A., private company K, lOlst Ohio infantry 

Shaffer, J., private company F, 101st Ohio infantry 

Wade, B. F., sergeant company A, 102d Ohio infantry 

Beanten, J., private company A, 102d Ohio infantry 

Crawford, E., private company A, 102d Ohio infantry 

Fabra, D., private company A, 102d Ohio infantry 

Gein, J , private company A, 102d Ohio infantry 

McGinness, L., private company A, 102d Ohio infantry 

Grand, J. Watt, private, company A, 102d Ohio infantry 

Haley, John, private company A, 102d Ohio infantry 

Hall, G. L., private company A, lU2d Ohio infantry 

Hasp, Geo , private company A, 102d Ohio infantry 

Homer, Jacob, private company A, 102d Ohio infantry 

Henderson, W., private company A, 102d Ohio infantry 

Lee, W., private company A, 102d Ohio infantry 

Merchand, L., private company A, 102d Ohio infantry 

Mitchell, Jas., private company A, 102d Ohio infantry 

Peckham, O. R., private company A, 102d Ohio infantry 

Rose, J. S., private company A, 102d Ohio infantry 

Ross, Wir., private company A, 102d Ohio infantry 

Shrader, John, private company A, 102d Ohio infantry 

Stagle, E. K., private company A, 102d Ohio infantry 

Stephens, S. S., private company A, 102d Ohio infantry 

Wallace, W. A., private company A, 102d Ohio infantry 

Richard, R., sergeant company B, 102d Ohio infantry 

Krebs, H., corporal company B, 102d Ohio infantry 

Bahn, A., private company B, 102d Ohio infantry 



* Killed. t Scalded and died at Memphis. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 



403 



McCrea, J., private company B, 

Fisher, D., private company B, 

Mercer, J. M., private. company B, 

Potter, S. R., private company B, 

Spafforri, H., private company B, 

Stocker, S., private company B, 

Webster, A., private company B, 

Wells, Jos., private company B, 

Whlssemore, A., private company B, 

Woods, M., private company B, 

Heimberger, W. C, * sergeant company C, 

Wolton, P. L., sergeant company C, 

Bierly, J„ corporal company C, 

Beal, Amos, private company C, 

Flint, B., private company C, 

Oyster, Simon, private company C, 

Simon, J., private.- company C, 

Wheeler, D., private company C, 

Wisler, W., private company C, 

Willis, W. W., private company C, 

Hosts, J. B.,* sergeant company D, 

Omeveg, G. H.,* sergeant company D, 

Baker, John,* private company D, 

Bringraan, J. D., private company D, 

Burt, J. H.,* private company D, 

Errick, W.,* private company D, 

Grice, David,* private company D, 

Horn, P. L., private company I, 

Keley, J. Mc.,t private company 1, 

Kochendeflfer, J. H., private company D, 

Sidle, H., private company D, 

Smutz, G., private company I, 

Strawbaugh, S.,* private company D, 

Ulick, G. W., private company D, 

Underwood, Jas., private company D, 

Warmly, M., private company D, 

Williams, J. T.,* private company D, 

Drocliss, J., corporal company E, 

Irons, Jacob, corporal company E, 

Couter, E., private company E, 

Graber, D , private company E, 

Lockhart, W., private company E, 

Stuff, Fred, private company E, 

Anderson, G., private. company F, 

Keeler, Wm., private company F, 

Saunders, J., private company F, 

Shepperly, G., private company F, 

* Killed. + Died next day. 



102d Ohio infantry 
103d Ohio infantry 
102d Ohio infantry 
102d Ohio infantry 
102d Ohio infantry 
102d Ohio infantry 
103d Ohio infantry 
103d Ohio infantry 
102d Ohio infantry 
103d Ohio infantry 
102d Ohio infantry 
102d Ohio infantry 
102d Ohio infantry 
102d Ohio infantry 
102d Ohio infantry 
102d Ohio infantry 
102d Ohio infantry 
102d Oliio infantry 
102d Ohio infantry 
103d Ohio infantry 
103d Ohio infantry 
103d Ohio infantry 
102d Ohio infantry 
103d Ohio infantry 
102d Ohio infantry 
102d Ohio infantry 
103d Ohio infantry 
102d Ohio infantry 
102d Ohio infantry 
102d Ohio infantry 
102d Ohio infantry 
103d Ohio infantry 
102d Ohio infantry 
102d Ohio infantry 
102d Ohio infantry 
102d Ohio infantry 
102d Ohio infantry 
103d Ohio infantry 
103d Ohio infantry 
103d Ohio infantry 
103d Ohio infantry 
102d Ohio infantry 
102d Ohio infantry 
103d Ohio infantry 
102d Ohio infantry 
102d Ohio infantry 
102d Ohio infantry 



404 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 



Shoup, C. W., private company F, 102d Ohio 

Stine, D. G., private. company F, 102d Ohio 

Torbet, Rm private company F, 102d Ohio 

Kites, Dan., sergeant ..company G, 102d Ohio 

Johns, D. W., corporal company G, 102d Ohio 

Price, S. P., private company G, 102d Ohio 

Huntsberger, J., corporal company H, 102d Ohio 

Ball, H„ private company H, 102d Ohio 

Baney, John, private company H, 102d Ohio 

Bardon, Otto, private company H, 102d Ohio 

Brenizer, A., private company H, 102d Ohio 

Brenizer, D., private company H, 102d Ohio 

Christine, -H., private company H, 102d Ohio 

Crowe, Wm., private - company H, ]02d Ohio 

Harrington, G., private. company H, 102d Ohio 

Smith, C, private company H, 102d Ohio 

Tracy, W. L , private company H, 102d Ohio 

Wells, Miles, private company H, 102d Ohio 

Wynn, W. J., Eg^vate company H, 102<1 Ohio 

Fast, W. N., sergeant company K, 102d Ohio 

Sprinkle, M. H., sergeant company K, 102d Ohio 

Fast, W. A., corporal company K, 102d Ohio 

Burnside, R., private company K, 102d Ohio 

Castle, Jas. L., private company K, 102d Ohio 

Hartman, J. F., private company K, 102d Ohio 

Leidig, R., private, company K, lOJd Ohio 

Ogden, C. P., private 

Singer, J. J., private company K, 102d Ohio 

Steinmetz, G., private company K, 102d Ohio 

Depmer, A., private company A, 103d Ohio 

Shaw,D, private company D, 103d Ohio 

Jenet, J., private company H, 103d Ohio 

Smith, W. W., private company B, 104th O'lio 

Patterson, S., private company F, lOith Ohio 

Winkleman, private company H, 104th Ohio 

Hallett, G. W., private company I, lOith Ohio 

Molton, D., private ....company I, 104th Ohio 

Smith, B. F., private company A, 105th Ohio 

Joseph, M., private company E, 111th Ohio 

McCord, G. B., 1st lieutenant company F, lUth Ohio 

Humbarger. S„ private company H, 111th Ohio 

Swarm, John L., private company K, lUth Ohio 

Long, B., private company C, 114th Ohio 

Hake, S. T., captain company B. 115th Ohio 

Eadie, John, 1st lieutenant company C, 115th Ohio 

Boosley, sergeant company C, 115th Ohio 

Elay, Jno., sergeant company C, 115th Ohio 

Jones, Arthur, sergeant company C, 115th Ohio 



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LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 405 

Way, Chas., W., sergeant company'C, 115th Ohio infantry 

Deitrich, C. W., corporal company C, 115th Ohio infantry 

Eadie, J. W., corporal company C, 115th Ohio infantry 

Eatinger, G. W., corporal company C, 115th Ohio infantry 

Everhart, J., corporal company C, 115th Ohio infantry 

Stevens,, C, corporal company C, 115th Ohio infantry 

Richardson, H., corporal company C, 115th Ohio infantry 

Tyson, Chas., corporal company C, 115th Ohio infantry 

Garrett, E. W., musician company C, 115th Ohio infantry 

Blair, M. V. B„ private company C, 115th Ohio infantry 

Cochran, H., private company C, 115th Ohio infantry 

Cook, J. C, private company C, 115th Ohio infantry 

Cook, J. S., private company C, 115th Ohio infantry 

Coady, T., private company C, 115th Ohio infantry 

Cross, Geo., private company C, 115th Ohio infantry 

Dickerson, R,, private company C, 115th Ohio infantry 

Dolan, James, private company C, 115th Ohio infantry 

Dusonberry, private company C, 115th Ohio infantry 

Doty, Nathan, private company C, 115th Ohio infantry 

Ellers, Edward, private company C, 115th C -So infantry 

Garrison, J. J., private company C, 115th Ohio infantry 

Greenover, J., private company C, 115th Ohio infantry 

Gulord, Roh't., private company C, I15th Ohio infantry 

Harris, G., private company C, 115th Ohio infantry 

Harris, Jno., private company C, 115th Ohio infantry 

Hume, F. L., private company C, 115th Ohio infantry 

Hurbert, Chas., private company C, 115th Ohio infantry 

King, Edward, private company C, 115th Ohio infantry 

Maley, V. A., private company C, 115th Ohio infantry 

Norton, W. H., private company C, 115th Ohio infantry 

Post, C, private ...company C, 115th Ohio infantry 

Price, W. D., private company C, 115th Ohio infantry 

Smothers, W., private company C, 115th Ohio infantry 

Stevens, W., private company C, 115th Ohio infantry 

Stout, Chas., private company C, 115th Ohio infantry 

Sysor, Jno., private company C, 115th Ohio infantry 

Weaver, P. A., private company C, 115th Ohio infantry 

Whitmore, Chas., private company C, 115th Ohio infantry 

Whitmore, L, private company C, 115th Ohio infantry 

Woods, Isaac, private company C, 115th Ohio infantry 

Zimmerman, J., private ..company C, 115th Ohio infantry 

Hendrick, A. M., private company D, 115th Ohio infantry 

Laflfater, A., private company D, 115th Ohio infantry 

Shaffer, J. K., 2d lieutenant company F, 115th Ohio infantry 

Rue, F. , sergeant company F, 1 15th Ohio infantry 

Smith, W. H., sergeant company F, 115th Ohio infantry 

Clapsaddle, F. A., private company F, 115th Ohio infantry 

Crul, B., private company F, 115th Ohio infantry 



406 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 



James, T. H., private company F, 115th Ohio infantry 

Roath, R. W., private company F, 115th Ohio infantry 

Spencer, F., private company F, 115th Ohio infantry 

Thoma?, L. A., private company F, 115th Ohio infantry 

Togle, J„ private company F, 115th Ohio infantry 

Thompson, E., sergeant company Gr, 115th Ohio infantry 

Alexander, P. H., corporal company G, 115th Ohio infantry 

Patterson, Jas., corporal company G, 115th Ohio infantry 

Gallon, J. C, private company G, 115th Ohio infantry 

Cox, Robt., private company G, 115th Ohio infantry 

Dana, W., private company G, 115th Ohio infantry 

Daro, J. M., private company G, 115th Ohio infantry 

Davis, Wm., private company G, U5th Ohio infantry 

Evans, Thos , private company G, 115th Ohio infantry 

Knapps, C, private company G, 115th Ohio infantry 

Myers, D., private company G, 115th Ohio infantry 

Keney, O., private company F, 116th Ohio infantry 

Robinson, J., private company A, 121st Ohio infantry 

Wallace, H, B., private company A, 124th Ohio infantry 

McDaniel, G., private company D, 124th Ohio infantry 

Adams, Jno., private company A, 125th Ohio infantry 

Watters, S. M., private company H, 125th Ohio infantry 

Lugenbeal, D. W., private company- F, 135th Ohio infantry 

Fest, J., * private company C, 153d Ohio infantry 

Van ?:more, M. T., private company C, 175th Ohio infantry 

Hendricks, G. W., private company C, 175th Ohio infantry 

Myers, W., private company D, 175th Ohio infantry 

Payne, Jas., private company D, 175th Ohio infantry 

Carroll, W., private company E, 175th Ohio infantry 

Gray, T. J,, private company E, 175th Ohio infantry 

Huason, private company G, 175th Ohio infantry 

Morris, Stacy, private company G, 175th Ohio infantry 

Kenard, A., private company C, 183d Ohio infantry 

Koland, P., private company C, 183d Ohio infantry 

Sugder, A., private company C, 1831 Ohio infantry 

Miller, Jos., sergeant company D, 183d Ohio infantry 

Polar, G. W., corporal company E, 183d Ohio infantry 

Gillisman, J., private company F, 183d Ohio infantry 

Manie, Davis, private company G, 183d Ohio infantry 

Zephrisharg, Gustave, sergeant company H, 183d Ohio infantry 

Earner, Jno , private company H, 183d Ohio infantry 

Bumgardner, W. J., private company K, 183d Ohio infantry 

Oliver, Thos., private company K, 183d Ohio infantry 

Genthar, J., private 183d Ohio infantry 

Wade, W. H., corporal company K, 1st Ohio cavalry 

Graham, G., private company A, 2d Ohio cavalry 

Allman, J., private company A, 2d Ohio cavalry 

Lockwood, D., private company A, 2d Ohio cavalry 

♦ Killed. ~~~~ 



LOSS OF THE SULTAiq"A. 



407 



Peas, Jas., corporal company B, 2d Ohio cavalry 

Russell, C. G., private company G, 2d Ohio cavalry 

Brown, A. C, private company I, 2d Ohio cavalry 

Brunner, D., private company K, 2d Ohio cavalry 

Haley, C. C, private company K, 2d Ohio cavalry 

Donald, H., private company K, 3d Ohio cavalry 

Erwin, J., private company K, 3d Ohio cavalry 

Gutton, W. N., private company K, 3d Ohio cavalry 

Jessow, R., private.... company K, 3d Ohio cavalry 

Pickens, I., private company K, 3d Ohio cavalry 

Pouch, E., private company K, 3d Ohio cavalry 

Rome, F., private company K, 3d Ohio cavalry 

Tidwell, C. B., private company K, 3d Ohio cavalry 

Torvell, H., private company K, 3d Ohio cavalry 

Wagoner, J., private company K, 3d Ohio cavalry 

Whiscar, private company K, 3d Ohio cavalry 

Green, C, private company L, 3d Ohio cavalry 

Lewis, D. C, 1st lieutenant company M, 3d Ohio cavalry 

Kertsteller, D. , private company M, 3d Oh io cavalry 

McWethy, C. H., private company M, 3d Ohio cavalry 

Stoner, J. W., corporal McLaughlin's squadron. 

Horter, J., corporal McLaughlin's squadron. 

Noland, Jos., private company H, 4th Ohio cavalry 

Smith., W. H., sergeant company K, 4th Ohio cavalry 

Browne, B., private company L, 4th Ohio cavalry 

Bonkey, N., sergeant oth Ohio cavalry 

Donnelly, M., private company K, 5th Ohio cavalry 

McMann, M., private company I, 6th Ohio cavalry 

Hanam, T., sergeant company A, 7th Ohio cavalry 

Lascur, A. J., sergeant company A, 7th Ohio cavalry 

Baldwin, J. R., corporal company A, 7th Ohio cavalry 

Gilfiss, W. F.,corporal company A, 7th Ohio cavalry 

McCluchy, corporal.-.. company A, 7th Ohio cavalry 

Baker, Wm., private company A, 7th Ohio cavalry 

Bell, J. K., private company A. 7th Ohio cavalry 

Botts, Thos., private company A, 7th Ohio cavalry 

Brickett, J., private company A, 7th Ohio cavalry 

Burbink, A., private company A, 7th Ohio cavalry 

Cameron, B., private company A, 7th Ohio cavalry 

Daona, J., private company A, 7th Ohio cavalry 

Dugan, W., private company A, 7th Ohio cavalry 

Drum, Chas., private company A, 7th Ohio cavalry 

Fanning, A , private company A, 7th Ohio cavalry 

Faulkner. J., private company A, 7th Ohio cavalry 

Foltz, P.., private company A, 7th Ohio cavalry 

Hill, G., private company A, 7th Ohio cavalry 

Hoyt, J., private company A, 7th Ohio cavalry 

McChollister, C, private company A, 7th Ohio cavalry ' 



408 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 



McDaniel, J., private company A, 7th Ohio cavalry 

Morganthater, J., private company A, 7th Ohio cavalry 

Orbey, F., private company A, 7th Ohio cavalry 

Robb, R. D., private company A, 7th Ohio cavalry 

Shannard, T. W., private company A, 7th Ohio cavalry 

Shecrick, S. A., private company A, 7th Ohio cavalry 

Trenol, I., private company A, Tth Ohio cavalry 

Woodward, T„ private company A, 7lh Ohio cavalry 

Harr, R., private company B, 7th Ohio cavalry 

Harrison, L. D., private. company B, 7th Ohio cavalry 

Maxwell, J, J., private company B, 7th Ohio cavalry 

Lenyshaw, C, private company D, 7th Ohio cavalry 

Dickson, A. C, private company E, 7th Ohio cavalry 

Rieble, W., private company E, 7th Ohio cavalry 

Weights, A. W., private company E, 7th Ohio cavalry 

Starrett, J. H., corporal company F, 7th Ohio cavalry 

Curley, J. J., private company F, 7th Ohio cavalry 

Sharp. J., private company G, 7th Ohio cavalry 

Laffln, J., hospital steward cavalry 

Shultz, E., private company A, 9th Ohio cavalry 

©ram, W., private company C, 9th Ohio cavalry 

Davis, M. J., sergeant company D, 9th Ohio cavalry 

Jopp, Jos., corporal company D, 9th Ohio cavalry 

Hanson, Thos., private company E, 9th Ohio cavalry 

Certcher, J., private company F, 9th Ohio cavalry 

Molten, W. P., private company F, 9th Ohio cavalry 

Mankin, T., private company H, 9th Ohio cavalry 

Heager, G., sergeant company K, 9th Ohio cavalry 

Brown, I., private company K, 9th Ohio cavalry 

Kirker, W., private company K, 9th Ohio cavalry 

Wright, F., private company M, 9th Ohio cavalry 

Taylor, C, private company A, 10th Ohio cavalry 

Bader, P. H., sergeant company B, 10th Ohio cavalry 

Jennings, J., private company B, 10th Ohio cavalry 

Morgan, John, private company B, 10th Ohio cavalry 

Taylor, A., private company G, 10th Ohio cavalry 

Burnett, J., private company M, 10th Ohio cavalry 

Hunter, A. E.,* private company M, 10th Ohio cavalry 

Hayner, E., private company A, 12th Ohio cavalry 

Roberts, C, private company E, 12th Ohio cavalry 

Roberts. C. A company E, 12th Ohio cavalry 

Collins, P., corporal company K, 12th Ohio cavalry 

Clancey, W. F., hospital steward 20th Ohio cavalry 

Long, G. M., corporal company E, 20th Ohio cavalry 

Lawstead, H, P., private company E, 20th Ohio cavalry 

Bothenbaugh, E., private company K, 20th Ohio cavalry 

Coup, D., private company D. 28th Ohio cavalry 

* Lost. 



LOSS OF THE SULTAlsTA. 409 



Rinehart, J., sergeant 23d Ohio Battery 

Kern8, L., private company C, 1st Tennessee cavalry 

Powell, John, private company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

King, Geo. A., private company B, 2d Tennessee cavalry 

Atchley, T company C, 2d Tennessee cavalry 

Meek, R., private company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Jack, M., private company F, 2d Tennessee cavalry 

Knight, J., private company F. 2d Tennessee cavalry 

Gulp, A. J., private company G, 2d Tennessee cavalry 

Lost, D. M., private company G, 2d Tennessee cavalry 

Patton, R. E., private company K, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Pilington, A., private company K, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Cowan, S A., sergeant company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Franelin, J. R., sergeant company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Rule, A. M., sergeant company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Bell, F. M., corporal company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Donnellson, D. D., corporal company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Kidd, Alexander, corporal company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Rodgers, M. H,, corporal company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Copeland, J., private company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Curtiss, J. T., private company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Dunlape, S. P., private company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Everett, Jas., private company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Farmer, A., private company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Farmer, E., private company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Farmer, J., private company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Finley, B. N., private company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Gamble, M., private company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Hasser, A., private company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Hasser, H., private company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Hausser, L., private company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Hedrick, D., private company A. 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Jeflers, Wm , private company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Keeble, J. H., private company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Kemble, J. H., private company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Kidd, J. W., private company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Kidd, L. M., private company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Osulivan, R. T., private company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Patty, J. A., private company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Payne, J. P., private company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Phelps, John, private company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Phelps, Wm., private company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Plumons, T. J., private company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Rale, B., private company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Russen, B., private company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Russell, N., private company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Splann, A., private company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Thompson, U., private company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry 



410 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

Tipton, C, private company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry- 
Wilson, A., private company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Vineyard, W. T., private company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Carver, Wm., sergeant company B, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Conellson, J. B., sergeant company B, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Davis, G. C, sergeant company B, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Davis, J. A., sergeant company B, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Tipton, A., sergeant company B, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Lelse, Adam, corporal company B, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

McClanihan, D., corporal company B, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Millsap, J., corporal company B, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Bailey, W., private company B, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Brown, M. S., private company B, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Brown, T. M., private company B, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Byron, J. H., private company B, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Carver, J., private company B, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Ellenberry, J., private company B, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Finger, A., private company B, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Hand, John F., private company B, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Lackly , J. B , private company B, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Leak, Jas., private company B, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Milsap, W., private company B, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Pinkney, W. C. private company B, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Prayer, Jos., private company B, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Purger, Wm., private company B, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Rodgers, T. W , private. company B, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Rolen, B. W., private company B, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Swaggerty, Wm. S., private company B, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Tipton, Jas., private company B, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Cortney, J. S., sergeant company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Dyer, S. A., sergeant company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Mattock, G., sergeant.. company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Wade, W. D., sergeant company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Brown, P. H., corporal company C, Sd Tennessee cavalry 

Cortney, W. S., corporal company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Cox, Jesse, corporal company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Lutrell, W., corporal company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

McPhail, D. M., corporal company O, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Shortz, J. W., corporal company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Varnell, A. P., corporal company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Wade, J. W., corporal company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Bishop, John, private company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Bishop, W., private company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Brandon, Jno., private company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Dickerson, J., private- company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

G-olden, J., private company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Graham, L., private ...company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Hickman, B., private company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry 



tiOSS OF tHE SULtAN"A. 411 



Hoback, Gr., private company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry- 
Kennedy, G. W., private company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Kinsha, G. S., private company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Mann, W. S., private company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

McPhail, B., private company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Mills, J. F., private company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Myers, J., private company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Neilor, W. N,, private company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Newman, G., private company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Palmer, W. N., private company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Rease, L., private company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Richter, H., private company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Riddle, J. R., private company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Robinson, Jas., private company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Ronimes, L., private company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Russell, O., private company O, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Scott, Jas., private company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Stroud, J. N., private company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Trobaugh, I., private company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Wood, J. E., private company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Wood, L., private company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Wood, Jno., private company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Harin, W., sergeant company D, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Hines, O. E., sergeant company D, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Hooper, J. H., sergeant company D, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Mansfield, W. S., sergeant company D, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Maxwell, G. W., sergeant company D, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Douglass, J. E., corporal company D, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Elsey, R. M., corporal company D, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Harris, Wm., corporal company D, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Nichols, D., corporal company D, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Strickley, M., corporal company D, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Wadell, S. M., corporal company D, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Demman, T., private company D, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Fergeson, J. H., private company D, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Haffager, J. W., private company D, 3d Tennessee cavlary 

Henry, J. W , private company D, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Long, A., private company D, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Long, Joiin, private company D, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Pierce, R. M., private company D, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Saylor, John, private company D, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Smith, W. D., private company D, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Kldd, James, sergeant company E, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Landers, D., sergeant company E, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Rice, John, sergeant company E, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Anderson, Jas., corporal company E, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Griffin, H., corporal company E, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Johnson, J. M., corporal company E, 3d Tennessee cavalry 



412 LOSS OP THE SULTANA. 



Meinsel, corporal company E, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Miller, J. W., corporal company E, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Swaggerty, S., corporal company E, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Way, M. v., corporal company E, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Whittenberger, D. A., corporal company E, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Williams, S. H., corporal company E, M Tennessee cavalry 

Baker, W. A., corporal company E, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Basley, W. J., corporal company E, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Bennett, E. M., corporal company E, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Burnette, O. H., corporal company E, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Crusoe, Wm., R., corporal company E, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Hamilton, R. N., corporal company E, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Henderson, J. C, corporal company E, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Hicks, J. H., corporal company E, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Hines, Joseph, corporal company E, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Murphy, E. A., corporal company E, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Murphy, J. M., corporal. company E, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Ottinger, M., corporal ..company E, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Simpson, I. H., corporal company E, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Thomas, Marion, corporal company E, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Allen, F. J., sergeant. company F, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Bailey, R. M., sergeant company F, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Hamilton, H. C, * sergeant company F, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Lee, E., sergeant company F, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Estes, J., corporal company F, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Bogert, C. H., private company F, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Bogert, S. F., private company F, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Bookout, J. L., priva'e company F, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Cof;hran, H., private company F, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Collins, J. R., private company F, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Conner, G. W., private company F, 3d T.^nnessee cavalry 

Doherty, J. M., private company F, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Elliott, J. W., private t company F, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Fuller, Jas., private company F, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Furgerson, W. H., private company F, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Howell, E., private company F, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Jones, O. C, private company F, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Leonard, T. J., private company F, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Long, M. B., private company F, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Marr, B. L., private company F, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

McClure, M. D., private company F, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Milton, Wm., private company F, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Mussin, H. M., private company F. 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Reed, R., private company F, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Smith, J. R., private company F, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Sprongle, G., private company F, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Stone, W.. private company F, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

* Probably lost. t Died next day. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 413 

Ursery, J. R., private company F, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Whiteman, R., private company F, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Williams, N. G., private company F, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Beard, J. 0., sergeant company Gr, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Turner, R., sergeant ^ company G, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Williams, D. M., corporal company G, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Williams, Jesse, corporal company G, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Baker, G., private company G, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Baker, Jacob, private company G, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Baker, John, private company G, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Brookp, Joseph, private. company G, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Cantrell, Jno, private company G, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Campbell, N. J., private company G, 3d Tennessee cayalry 

Collins, J. H., private company G, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Cunningham, Jas.. private company G, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Curtin, R. A., private. company G, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Gross, A., private company G, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Hamilton, Jas., private company G, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Hudson, P., private company G, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Humbrick, Jno., private company G, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Johnson, W. R., private company G, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Lee, Jas., private company G, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

McClauson, J. M., private company G, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Millard, L. R., private company G, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Mills, W., private company G, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Padyot, B., private company G. 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Wylers, L., private company G, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Walker, D. B., private company G, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Brown, M. E., sergeant. company H, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Evitt, W., sergeant company H, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Jones, J, W., sergeant company H, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Barnett, A., private company H, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Cursick, D., private company H, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Farmer, E., private company H, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Farmer, J. O., private. company H, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Farrer, G., private company H, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Firrett, Wm , private company H, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Hickox, J. E., private.. company H, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Hessinger, H. P., private company H, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Johnson, A., private company H, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Lopt, J. H., private company H, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Massey, J. J., private company H, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

DeAmond, H. H., sergeant company I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Fowler, A., sergeant company I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Frazier, J., sergeant company I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Howard, T. A., sergeant company I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Linconfelter, H., sergeant company I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Rhed, P., sergeant company I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 



414 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 



Murphy, Jno,, corporal company 

Russell, R. T., corporal company 

Atchley, P. A., private company 

Atsher, Wm., private company 

Bagart, M., private company 

Bean, P., private company 

Brock, J. A., private company 

Cooper, Rob't., private company 

Crawford, H. P., private company 

Dailey, John, private company 

Draper, D. S., private company 

Dunlap, A. B., private c mpany 

Ellison, Thos., private company 

Evans, S. M., private company 

Gibson, D., private company 

Hayden, D. A., private company 

Hill, W, S., private company 

Hines, Jas , private company 

Hockney, L., private company 

Johns, W., private company 

Johnson, Jacob, private.. company 

Kay wood, B. F., private company 

KJrkpatrick, J. R., private company 

Kirkpatrick, W. C, private company 

Linconfelter, G. T., private company 

Lindsay, J. R., private.. company 

McKann, A., private company 

McTeag, D., private company 

Morrison, G. C, private company 

Noe, Wm , private company 

Rodgers, W. J., private company 

Rodgers, J , private company 

Romins, G. R., private company 

Romins, S., private company 

Scott, James, private company 

Simpson, A. A., private company 

Simpson, J. G., private company 

Stanley, M., private company 

Stevens, Jno., private company 

Sumney, Jas., private .\jompany 

Tliompson, R , 1st sergeant company 

Wayland, L. A., sergeant company 

Caree, Jas., P., corporal company 

Cash, H. W., corporal company 

Rule, L, corporal company 

Allen, David, private company 

Battles, I., private company 

Battles, W. F., private company 



I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
L 3d Tennessee cavalry 
I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
1, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
I, 3d Tennetrsee cavalry 
I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
I, od Tennessee cavalry 
I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
I, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
K, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
K, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
K, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
K, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
K, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
K, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
K, 3d Tennessee cavalry 
K, 3d Tennessee cavalry 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 415 



Beggett, J. D., private company K, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Blane, M., private company K, 3d. Tennessee cavalry 

Chandler, B., private company K, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Davis, E., private company K, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Davis, Wm., private company K, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Dearman, L., private company K, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Dearman, Sol., private company K, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Finger, F., private company K, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Hodges, J. W., private company K, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Kinneman, J. M., private company K, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Lansom., G. M., private company K, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Leak, Wm., private company K, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

McMurry, R. R., private company K, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Ramsey, M., private company K, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Reed, Wm., M„ private company K, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Rule, C, private company K, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Scroggs, Isaac, private company K, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Smith, J. P., private company K, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Williams, E., private company K, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Knight, J, D., sergeant company L, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Mansfield, Z. M., sergeant company L, 3cl Tennessee cavalry 

Hurry, J , corporal company L, 3J Tennessee cavalry 

Jenkins, S., corporal company L, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Lemon, L., corporal company L, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Montgomery, J. L., corporal ...company L, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Wiggins., N.C.. corporal company L, 3cl Tennessee cavalry 

Hancock, W. B., private company L, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Hinchy, L. C, private company L, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Renlan, Thos., private company L, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Rodgers, Wm., private company L, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Robinson, H , private company M, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

McDowell, Wm., lieutenant... company A, 4th Tennessee cavalry 

Station, Henry, sergeant company A, 4tli Tennessee cavalry 

Dickens, Newton, private company A, 4th Tennessee cavalry 

Dronsgea, R., private company A, 4th Tennessee cavalry 

Hastshan, R., private company A, 4th Tennessee cavalry 

McMurry, W., private company A, 4th Tennessee cavalry 

Odin, P. H., private company A, 4th Tennessee cavalry 

Sumner, J. B., private company A, 4th Tennessee cavalry 

Develin, Jas., private company C, 4th Tennessee cavalry 

Norman, J., private company H, 4th Tennessee cavalry 

Bayless, W., private company I, 4th Tennessee cavalry 

Thomas, H., private company L, 4th Tennessee cavalry 

Phelps, O., private company L, 5th Tennessee cavalry 

Sheton, O. Gr., private company E, 5th Tennessee cavalry 

Gray, M. L., private company G, 6th Tennessee cavalry 

Walberton, private company G, 6th Tennessee cavalry 

Derryburg, J. H., private company A, 7th Tennessee cavalry 



416 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

Smith, J., private company C, 7th Tennessee cavalry 

Harover, John, private company D, 7th Tennessee cavalry 

Small, H. J., private company H, 7th Tennessee cavalry 

Campbell, W., private company K, 7th Tennessee cavalry 

Davenport, J. K., private company K, 7th Tennessr'e cavalry 

Montgomery, C, private company A, 8th Tennessee cavalry 

Nevins, L , private. company A, 8th Tennessee cavalry 

Minsey, R., private company B, 8th Tennessee cavalry 

Husted, T. D., private company C, 11th Tennessee cavalry 

White, James, corporal company D, 11th Tennessee cavalry 

Pierce. R., private company C, 12th Tennessee cavalry 

Brownley, J. B., private company A, 2d Tennessee mt'd. inf. 

Emenery, W., private company A, 2d Tennessee mt'd. inf. 

Grier, J. A., private company A, 2d Tennessee mt'd. inf. 

Moflatt, Jas., private company C, 2d Tennessee mt'd. inf, 

Rease, W., sergeant company G, 2d Tennessee mt'd. inf. 

Anderson, J. F., corporal company I, 3d Tennessee infantry 

Ramsey, M. C, private company I, 3d Tennessee Infantry 

Foster, H.C., private company A, Ist Virginia cavalry 

Manner, A., private company A, Ist Virginia cavalry 

Cruddu, W. A., private company D, 1st Virginia cavalry 

McHenry, Jas., private company D, 1st Virginia cavalry 

Smith, G. G., private company D, 1st Virginia cavalry 

Stephens, A., private company D, 1st Virginia cavalry 

Craig, Anthony, private company C, 1st Virginia cavalry 

Reeble, C, private company G, 1st Virginia cavalry 

Loy, Geo. <^., private company I, 1st Virginia cavalry 

StaflEord, S. D. L., private company L, 3d Virginia cavalry 

Woodyard, L., private company A, 4th Virginia cavalry 

Stelle, J. N., private company C, 5th Virginia cavalry 

Lyons, J. H., corporal company B, 6th Virginia cavalry 

Lawless, E., private. company B, 6tli Virginia cavalry 

Match, John, private company K, 6th Virginia cavalry 

Morris, Jas., private. company H, 6th Virginia cavalry 

Talmadge, J., private company H, 6th Virginia cavalry 

Wilson, T. P., private company H, 6th Virginia cavalry 

Hall, J. F., sergeant company I, 6th Virginia cavalry 

Johnson, H., sergeant company I, 6th Virginia cavalry 

Parker, J. R., corporal company 1, 6th Virginia cavalry 

Tucker, G. W., corporal company I, 6th Virginia cavalry 

Dabney, G., private company I, 6th Virginia cavalry 

Jones, Stephen, private company I, 6th Virginia cavalry 

Maury, C. R., private company I, 6th Virginia cavalry 

McDaniel, J. W., private company I, 6th Virginia cavalry 

McDowell, F. M., private company I, 6th Virginia cavalry 

Oaley, W., private company I, 6th Virginia cavalry 

Rhodes, A., private company I, 6th Virginia cavalry 

McEwen, Jas., captain company K, 6th Virginia cavalry 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 



417 



Burns, Pat, private company K, 6th Virginia cavalry 

Elder, J. J., private company K, 6th Virginia cavalry 

Hughes, H., private company K, 6th Virginia cavalry 

Martin, J. H., private company K, 6th Virginia cavalry 

McCubber, J. B., private company K, 6th Virginia cavalry 

Bradley, G., private. company A, 7th Virginia cavalry 

Goodflashler, G. W., private company A, 7th Virginia cavalry 

Cardeirlle, W. M., private company C, 7th Virginia cavalry 

Handorf, Jno., H., corporal company F, 7th Virginia cavalry 

English, W., private company F, 7th Virginia cavalry 

Mass, Jas., private company F, 7th Virginia cavalry 

Ragsdale, Robert, private company F, 7th Virginia cavalry 

Riley, Jno., private company F, 7th Virginia cavalry 

Willhelm, C, private company F, 7th Virginia cavalry 

Mallaby, M., private company G, 7th Virginia cavalry 

Creen, A. W., sergeant company L, 7th Virginia cavalry 

McKnight, J., private company L, 7th Virginia cavalry 

Scott, Thos., H., private company L, 7th Virginfa cavalry 

Roberts, J. R., private company L, 7th Virginia cavalry 

Mattlinger, J., private company F, 10th Virginia cavalry 

Barett, J. T.,2d lieutenant company A, 12th Virginia cavalry 

Monday, J., private company K, 12th Virginia cavalry 

Gambol, H., private company B, 14th Virginia cavalry 

Cornell, E., private company G, 14th Virginia cavalry 

Bartlett, E. M., private company C, 16th Virginia cavalry 

Springer, S., private company E, 16th Virginia cavalry 



53 



418 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 



Persons Known to have been on Board but Not 
Reported in the Official List. 

Sanders, S. F company I, 137th Illinois 

Frazee, Martin company (J, 2d Indiana cavalry 

Lee, Asa E company A, 6th Indiana cavalry 

Kline, Henry J company G, 9th Indiana cavalry 

Mayes, J. H company C, 40th Indiana cavalry 

Stewart, Geo. W. company D, 40th Indiana infantry 

Hazellaige, captain company K, 40th Indiana 

Taylor, Joe., lieutenant I24th Indiana infantry 

May, John. 137th Indiana cavalry 

Williams 1st Kentucky cavalry 

Gambill, Henry company B, 14th Kentucky infantry 

Curnsltte, Elisha company G, 14th Kentucky infantry 

Hamlin, O.E company E, 2d Michigan cavalry 

Johnson, B. F. company A, 5th Michigan cavalry 

Clarkson, Geo. A company H, 5th Michigan cavalry 

Norton, Henry company B, 8th Michigan cavalry 

White, Manly C company B, 8tli Michigan cavalry 

Kinney, John * 8th Michigan cavalry 

Wendt, Wm company L, 8th Michigan cavalry 

Dunsmore, J. W company I, 1st Michigan E. and M. 

Stevens, Joseph company E, 4th Michigan Infantry 

Hindes, Elias E company A, 18th Michigan infantry 

Jones, A company B, 18th Michigan infantry 

Smith, O. W company B, 18th Michigan infantry 

Thayer, C company B, 18th Michigan infantry 

Porter, W. G company C, 18th Michigan infantry 

Larkey, Pat * ...company E, 18th Michigan infantry 

Hohns, M company F, 18th Michigan infantry 

Aldrich, H. C, sergeant company G, ISih Michigan infantry 

West, C. A company G, 18th Michigan infantry 

Nicholas, C company H, 18th Michigan infantry 

Hampton, E company 1, 18th Michigan infantry 

Upton, H. H company 1, 18th Michigan infantry 

Hinds, T. J ...company K, I8th Michigan infantry 

Mann, Jas. H company K, 18tli Michigan infantry 

Metta, A. R. t company K, 18th Michigan infantry 

Russell, Jas company K, 18th Michigan infantry 

Shettleroe, Isadore company K, 18th Michigan infantry 

Stremp, Geo company K, 18th Michigan infantry 

* Lost. t Killed. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 419 

Henks, T. W., captain. 4th Missouri cavalry 

Brown, A, C company I, 2d Ohio infantry 

Lewis, lieutenant 3d Ohio cavalry 

Barnes, Wm company H, 32d Ohio infantry 

Kearns, John company F, 40th Ohio infantry 

Oxley, Stewart company I, 5Ist Ohio infantry 

Gregory, W. W company C, 55th Ohio infantry 

Friesner, W. S company K, 58th Ohio infantry 

Boor, Wm , private company D, 6tth Ohio infantry 

Norris, Albert company A, 76th Ohio infantry 

Davis, J. W., lieutenant 77th Ohio infantry 

Yeisley, Wm. company E, 102d Ohio infantry 

Sheafer, I. N company E, llath Oho infantry 

Zazier, J. P company F, 115th Ohio infantry 

Morgan, L. G company D, 12lstOhio infantry 

Faldermau, Benj company K, 121st Ohio infantry 

Fisher, Geo company K, 131st Ohio infantry 

Gaston, G.. M. , company K, 121st Ohio infantry 

Greer, Seth company K, 121st Ohio infantry 

Trent, Rob't A , sergeant company B,' 1st Tennessee cavalry 

Carver, Wm company B, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Hamilton, John company F, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Hamilton, R. N. company F, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Hodges, Wiley J. company F, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Jones, H. C, corporal company F, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Atchley, P. L company K, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Pacgle, Thos company K, 3d Tennessee cavalry 

Elliott, J. W ,capt.iin company F, 44th U. S. C. T. 



420 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 



Name, Company, Regiment, and Present Postoffice, 
as far as Known, of those Living. 



Abadaska, C. W., company F, 18th Michigan infantry, Waldron, Mich. 
Aldrich, H. C, * company G, 18th Michigan infantry. 
Allen, Daniel, company K, 3d TennesFse cavalry, Allensville, Tenn. 
Allison, Hiram, company G, 9th Indiana cavalry, Muncie, Ind. 
Anderson, Geo., company F, lOZd Ohio infantry, Seville, Ohio. 
Anderson, James, company E, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Knoxville, Tenn. 
Atchley, P. L., company K, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Trotter's Store, Tenn. 
Atchley, Thos., company M, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Catlettsburgh, Tenn. 
"Baggett, J. D., Stell's Depot, Alabama. 

Baker, Murry S., company D, 4th Michigan, Williamston, Mich. 
Bardon, Otto, company H, 102d Ohio infantry, Wooster, Ohio. 
Barker, Frank, company K, 2d Michigan cavalry, Brockway, Mich. 
Barnes, Wm., company A, 63d Ohio infantry, Nelsonville, Ohio. 
Battles, W. F., Slate, Alabama. 

Bement, Geo., company F, 25th Michigan infantry, Adamsville, Mich. 
Berry, C. D., company I, 20th Michigan infantry, Tekonsha, Mich. 
Boor, Wm.. company D, 64th Ohio infantry, Sandusky, Ohio. 
Bracken, Wm. D., company D, 88th United States Colored Troops 

infantry, Putnam, 111. 
Bradley, C. H., company M, 3d Ohio cavalry, Ohio. 
Brady, Jas. K., company B, 64th Ohio infantry, Morral, Ohio. 
Bringman, J., company D, 102d Ohio infantry, Enon Valley, Pa. 
Brown, A. C, company I, 2d Ohio infantry. Canon City, Col. 
Brown, Jas., company F, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Boyds Creek, Tenn. 
Brummer, Michael, company C, 59th Ohio infantrj', Georgetown, Ohio. 
Byerly, W. J., company E, 3d Ohio infantry, Ebenezer, Tenn. 
^armack, Thos., company A, 64th Ohio infantry, Cleveland, Ohio. 
Carver, Wm„ company B, 3d Tennessee cavalry, 612 east 3d st. Mays- 

ville, Ky. 
Cassel, Abraham, company B, 21st Ohio infantry, McComb, Ohio. 
Cheflf, S. D., company G, 6th Kentucky cavalry, Lebanon, Kan. 
Christine, W. H., company H, 102d Ohio infantry, 319 east Spring st, 

Columbus, Ohio. 
Clapsaddle, Frank, company F, 115th Ohio infantry, Marlboro, Ohio. 
Clarkson, G. A., company H, 5th Michigan, Oak wood Park, Mich, 
dinger, G. M., company E, 16th Kentucky infantry, Maysville, Ky. 
Cook, J. S., company C, 115th Ohio infantry, Kent, Ohio. 
Cornell, A. W., company B, 18th Michigan infantry, Rome Center, Mich. 
Conk, VV. A., Lowe, Kansas. 
Cowen, Samuel, company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Marysville, Tenn. 

* Dead. 



LOSS OP THE SULTANA. 421 



Crawford, Ezra, company A, 102d Ohio infantry, Shreve, Ohio. 

Cranmer, A. O., company B. 64th Ohio infantry, Marion, Ohio. 

Crisp, Wm., company D, 18th Michigan, Silver Creek, Neb. 

Curtis, Jas., company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Marysville, Tenn. 

Darrow, Marvin, 18th Michigan infantry, Blissfleld, Mich. 

Davis, B. G., company L, 7th Kentuclty cavalry, Covington, Ky. 

Davis. John, company D, 100th Ohio infantry, Defiance, Ohio. 

Davis, John C, company B, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Knoxville, Tenn. 

Davis, John G., company K, 65th Ohio Infantry, New Baltimore, Ohio. 

Dawson, Geo , Whitehall, 111. 

Day, R. E., Raymond City, 111. 

Deerman, L. A., company K, 3d Tennessee cavalry. Steels Depot, Ala. 

Demoss, John, Warsaw, Ohio. 

Douglass, James E., Trotters Store, Tenn. 

Duesler, G. W., Donovan, III. 

Dunlape, Samuel P., company B, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Farmington, 

Ark. 
Dunsmore, J. W„ company 1, 1st Michigan Engineers and Mechanics, 

Harrison, Mich, 
Eddleman, David, company I, 64th Ohio Infantry, Canton, Ohio. 
Elder, W. H., company H, 58th, Bremen, Ohio. 
Elliott, J. W., company E, 10th Indiana infantry, and company F, 44th 

LTuited States Colored Troops infantry, Arab, Ala. 
Elliott, J. T., 2d lieutenant company C, 124th regiment Indiana Volun- 
teer Infantry, 84 east Market street, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Engle, John, company B, 21st, Bentonridge, Ohio. 
Everhart, John, Akron, Ohio. 

Everman, Nathan, company F, 40th Indiana Infantry, Lebanon, Ind. 
Falderman, B., company K, I02d Ohio infantry, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Farmer, Elias, company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Marysville, Tenn. 
Fast, W. A., Sedalia, Mo. 

Fast, W. N. company K, 103d Ohio infantry. Napoleon, Ohio. 
Fies, Wm., company B, 64th Ohio infantry, Marion, Ohio, 
Fogle, John, company F, 115th Ohio infantry, Hays City, Kans. 
Foglesang, N., company A, 18th Michigan infantry, Prattsville, Mich. 
Frazee, Martin, company C, 2d Indiana cavalry, 1209 New Main street, 

Louisville, Ky. 
Frederick, G. H., company D, 7th Indiana cavalry. Fort Wayne, Ind. 
Furnia, S. D., Erie, Mich. 

Friesner, W. S., company K, 58th Ohio infantry, Logan, Ohio. 
Gambill, H., company B, 14th Kentucky infantry, Blaine, Ky. 
Garber, Daniel, company E, 102d Ohio infantry, Butler, Ohio. 
Gaston, Stephen M., company K, 9th Indiana cavalry, 523 Magnolia 

street, Sherman, Texas. 
Gibson, David, company I, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Swuinill, Tenn. 
Goodrich, W. N., company E, 18th Michigan infantry, Menominee, 

Mich. 
Graham, John, Dayton, Ohio. 



422 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

Greenfield, R. L, Ontario, Ohio. 

Gregory, N. W., company C, 55th Ohio infantry, Lead City, South Dak, 
Guard, John W., company K, 7th Indiana cavalry, Elwood, Ind. 
Haines, S. C, company G, 40th Indiana infantry, Romney, Ind. 
Hales, O. P., company G, 18th Michigan infantry, Mosherville, Mich. 
Hamblin, O. E., company E, 2d Michigan cavalry, Pulaski, Mich. 
Hamilton, R. N., company F, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Van Alstyne, Texab* 
Hana, H. H., company G, iSlst Indiana cavalry, Dayton, Ohio. 
Harberth, C. H., company C, 115th Ohio infantry, Cleveland, Ohio. 
Harmon, Daniel, company K, 18th Michigan infantry, Defiance, Ohio. 
Harris, John, Cuyahoga Fall?, Ohio. 
Hatch, A. N., company F, 1st Michigan, Ellington, Mich. 
Hawk, Marion, company D, 3d Ohio cavalry, Fremont, Ohio. 
Helminger, J., company B, 50th Ohio infantry. New Sharon, Iowa 
Hershey. M. B., comp my A, 29th Michigan infantry, Hillsdale, Mich. 
Hill, Wm. S., company L, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Rockford, Tenn. 
Hines, Joseph, company L, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Trundles X Roads 

Tenn. 
Hindee, E. E., company A, 18th Mich'gan infantry, Clayton, Mich. 
Hinson, Thos., company E, 9th Ohio cavalry, Steubenville, Ohio. 
Hodges, Wiley, compiny 1, 3d Tennessee cavalry, 
Horn, P. L , company I, 102d Ohio Infantry, Wooster, Ohio. 
Horner, Ira B., company K, 65th Ohio infantry, Weston, Ohio. 
Horner, Jacob, company A, 102d Ohio infantry, Nashville, Ohio. 
Huflsej', John, 49th Ohio infantry. Tiffin. Ohio. 
Huld, W. A., company A, 64th Ohio infantry, Armerdale, Kansas. 
Hulit, Geo., 104th Ohio infantry, Kent, Ohio. 

Humphrey, \Y. C, company B, 50th Ohio infantry, Middletown, Ohio. 
James, John, Akron, Ohio. 
James, John H., company F, 115th Ohio infantry, 707 North Howard 

street, Akron, Ohio. 
Johnson, G. J., company A, 18th Michigan infantry, Medina, Mich. 
Johnson, James M., company E, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Knoxville, Tenn. 
Johnson, Lewis, company G, 9th Indiana cavalry, Cowau, Ind. 
Johnston, B. F., company A, 5th Michigan cavalry, Almont, Mich. 
Jones, Arthur A., company C, 115th Ohio infantry, Parkman, Ohio. 
Jones, Dock, Shady Grove, Tenn. 

Jones, J. W , company E, ISth Michigan infantry, Pennfield, N. Y. 
Jone?, H. C , company F, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Coy tee, Tenn. 
KarnF, Nicholas, company B, 18th Ohio infantry. Plain City, Ohio. 
Kennedy, E. J., cooapany K, 64th Ohio infantry, Berea, Ohio. 
Kibbl<^, Pleasant, company H, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Marysville, Tenn. 
Kidd, Alexander, company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Marysville, Tenn. 
Kidd, L. M,, company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Marysville, Tenn. 
Kimberlin, J. H., McCordsville, Ind. 
Kimmel, Rinaldo, * company E, 21st Ohio infantry. 
King, A. W., company D, 100th Ohio infantry, Defiance, Ohio. 

* Dead. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 423 

King, Geo. A., company B, 2d Tennessee cavalry, Tong, Blount county, 

Tenn. 
Klnser, Hugh, company E, 50th Ohio iofantrjs Albion, Neb. 
Kline, Henry J., company G, 9th Indiana cavalry, Mill Grove, Ind. 
Kochenderfer, John H., company D, 103d Ohio infantry, Galion, Ohio. 
Kurtz, John J., company F, 7th Ohio cavalry, Waggoner's Ripple, Ohio. 
Lahue, C. J., company D, 13th Indiana cavalry, Great Bend, Kansas. 
Landon, Simeon, company D, 6ith Ohio infantry, 

Langley, James, company K, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Shook's P. O., Tenn. 
Leaice, Adam, company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Knoxville, Tenn. 
Lease, A. G., company B, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Union Grove, Ind. 
Lee, Wesley, company A, 102d Ohio infantry, Winston, Mo. 
Lee, A. E , company A, Tlst Indiana cavalry, Tulare, Cal. 
Lee, J. W., company A., 102d Ohio infantry, Memphis, Tenn. 
Lesley, John, company K, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Carlock, Tenn. 
Leisure, A. J., company A, 7th Ohio cavalry, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Lewis, John B., company K, 9th Indiana infantry, Gallatin, Mo. 
Ligfetter, company I, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Rockford, Tenn. 
Lingenfelter, Thos., Miser, Tenn. 
Lingenfelter, H., Rockford, Tenn. 

Linkenff Iter, T , company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Marysville, Tenn. 
Long, Robert, company D, 65th Ohio infantry, Cardington Ohio. 
Love, Thos.. gunboat Essex, Clayton, Mich. 

Luganbeal, D. W., company F, 135th Ohio infantry, Perryton, Ohio. 
Lyborger, P. A., company L, 2d Michigan cavalry, Adamsville, Mich. 
Mackelroy, J.. Delaware, Ohio. 

Madden, W. P., company I, 44th Ohio infantry, Xenia, Ohio. 
Maes, Jotharo, company D, 47lh Ohio infantry. New Boston, Mich. 
Mahoney, Jerry, company I, 2d Michigan cavalry. 
Manier, Darius, LaCarne, Ohio. 

Martin, Jesse, company D, 35th Indiana infantry, Mt. Pleasant, Ohio. 
Mayes, J. H., company H, 40th Indiana infantry, Carson, Ind. 
Maxman, Marshall, company A, 2d Michigan, Bay City Mich. 
McClanahan, D. B., company B, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Marysville, Tenn. 
McCord, G. B., company F, 111th Ohio infantry, Hanford, Cal. 
McCrory, L. W., company A, 100th Ohio infantry, Mungen, Ohio. 
McDaniel, G. M., 10th Indiana cavalry, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
McFarland, W. A., company A, 42d Indiana infantry, Evansville, Ind. 
Mcintosh, E. W., company E, Hth Illinois infantr3% Decatur, 111. 
McLeod, Daniel, company F, 18th Illinois infantry, 818 Market street, 

St. Louis, Mo. 
McMurry, Bart, company B, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Marysville, Tenn. 
McNeal, David, company H, 7th Michigan cavalry, Irving, Kansas. 
Millsaps, James, company B, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Marysville, Tenn. 
Millsaps, J. W., company B, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Marysville, Tenn. 
Millsaps, W^m., company B, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Marysville, Tenn. 
Moore, James, Dayton, Ohio. 
Morgan, L. G., company B, 21st Ohio infantry, 119 Frazer street, Findlay, 

Ohio. 



424 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

Monlton, Dallas, Brlmfleld, Ohio. 

Mourning, A. J., company D, 11th Illinois cavalry, Toledo, Ohio. 

Nevins, J. F., company F, I8th Michiecan infantry. Frontier, Mich. 

Nickerson, Henry, Circleville, Ohio. 

Nihart, A., company G, 90th Ohio ir-fantry, Bolivar, Mo. 

Niles, A. J., Spring Creek, Kansas. 

Nisley, C. M., company D, 40th Indiana, 36 Elizabeth street, LaFayette,. 

Ind. 
Norcutt, J. W., company D, 18th Michigan infantry, Campbell, Mich. 
Norris, Albert, company A, 76th Ohio infantry. Union Station, Ohio. 
Norris, J. B., company B, 5l8t Ohio infantry, Randolph, Neb. 
Norton, J. E., company A, 5th Michigan cavalry, 62 DuflBeld street^ 

Detroit, Mich. 
Norton, Wm. H., company C, 115th Ohio infantry, Hudson, Ohio. 
Oxley, Stewart, company I, 51st Ohio infantry, Burr Oak, Iowa. 
Pangle, Thos., company K, 3d Tennessee cavalry. New Madrid, Mo. 
Patterson, J. S., company F, 104th Ohio cavalry. 
Peachin, Edward, cor. 4th and South streets. Lata, Ind. 
Peacock, Wm. H., company G, 9th Indiana cavalry. Cowan, Ind. 
Perkins, F. M., company E, 3d Michigan cavalry, Parkersburg, Iowa. 
Phelps, J. M„ company A. 3d Tennessee cavalry, Knoxville, Tenn. 
Phillips, Wm. 

Pickens, Saul, company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Knoxville, Tenn. 
Porter, W. G., company C, 18th Michigan infantry, Weston, Mich. 
Potter, W. Scott, company G, 54th Ohio infantry, Dayton, Ohio. 
Ponpard, Samuel, Vienna, Mich. 

Prangle. J. R., company K, 3d Tennessee cavalry, New Madrid, Mo. 
Prindle, R. M., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Potter, S. R., company B, 102d Ohio infantry, Mansfield, Ohio. 
Randebaugh, G. H.. company K, 65th Ohio infantry, Lindsay, Ohio. 
Ray, Christian, company F, 50th Ohio, Greenville, Ohio. 
Ray, Patson, company I, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Knoxville, Tenn. 
Rhodes, Abraham, company I, 6th Kentucky cavalry, Kellerton, Iowa. 
Riley, Wm., Oakland, Ind. 

Robinson, G. F., company C, 2d Michigan cavalry, Owosso, Mich. 
Roselot, Peter F., company E, 50th Ohio infantry, Mowrystown, Ohio. 
Ross, Wm., company A, 102d Ohio infantry. Big Prairie, Ohio. 
Rule, C, company K, 3d Tennessee cavalry. New Knob Creek, Tenn. 
Rule, Robert, company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Rockford, Tenn. 
Rush, J. W., company L, 3d Ohio cavalry, Larned, Kansas. 
Russell, Adam, company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Homestead, Kansas. 
Russell, Calvin, company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Marysville, Tenn. 
Russell, Nick, company A, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Marysville, Tenn. 
Russell, O. C, company C, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Morgantown, Tenn. 
Rutman, Adam, company F, 115th Ohio Volunteer infantry, Akron, 

Ohio. 
Saflfen, Jas., Carthage, Ohio. 
Sanders, Dr. S. F., company 1, 137th Illinois', Holdredge, Neb. 



LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 425 

Sangley, James M., company K, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Shooles, Tenn. 

Saunders, Ignatius, comrany F, 102d Ohio infantry, Auburndale, Ohio. 

Sayer, S. K., Mt Union, Iowa. 

Sayler, John, Strawberry Plains, Tenn. 

Schievesmyre, L., company A, 32d Indiana infantry, Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Schmutz, G. L., company T, 102d Ohio infantry, Wooster, Ohio. 

Seabury, C. G., company B, 8th Michigan cavalry, Coloma, Mich. 

Sheaffer, I. N., company E, 115th Ohio infantry. Canton, Ohio. 

Sharp, Thos., company F, 2d Wisconsin cavalry, Dunleith, W. Va. 

Shaul, W. R., company E, 95th Ohio infantry. Cable, Ohio. 

Shettleroe, Isadore, company K, 18th Michigan infantry, Toledo, Ohio. 

Shettleroe, Samuei, Vienna, Mich. 

Shields, Peyton, company D, Slst Ohio infantry, Mt Gilead, Ohio. 

Shoemaker, A,, company E, 72d Ohio infantry, Carroll, Ohio. 

Shummard, W. T., company A, 7th Ohio cavalry, Brazilton, Kansas. 

Simpson, J. H , company I, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Knoxville, Tenn. 

Slick, J. L., company A, 18th Michigan infantry, Lambertsville, Mich. 

Smith, Com., company F, 8th Michigan infantry, Remus, Mich, 

Smith, G. F., .Tonesville, Mich. 

Smith, Truman, company B, 8th -Michigan cavalry. Grand Rapids^ 

Mich. 
Solenborger, G. W., company A, 58th Ohio infantry, Sugar Grove, Ohio. 
Sumerville, Perry, company K. 41«t Indiana cavalry, Brazil, Ind. 
Sorgen, E., company G, 4th Ohio infantry, Kenton, Ohio. 
Soulier, Samuel, company K, 18th Michigan infantry. Willow Lake, 

Dak. 
Spafford, Harrison, company D, 102d Ohio infantry, Hayesville, Ohio. 
Sprinkle, M. H., company K, 102d Ohio infantry, Eaton Rapids, Mich. 
Squire, E. J , company D, 101st Ohio infantry, Monroe ville, Ohio. 
Stevens, Joseph, company B, Ist Michigan sharpshooters. East Buffalo^ 

New York. 
Stewart, G. W., company D, 40th Indiana infantry, Wellington, Kan. 
Strasser, Louis, company K, 2d Michigan cavalry, Columbus, Ohio. 
Stubber field, S., company F, I8th Michigan infantry, Waldron, Mic^. 
Sutenbaker, L., company D, 8th Michigan cavalry, St. Charles, Mich, 
Swaggarty, Vance, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Linton, Ind. 
Swain, E. B,, Muncie, Ind. 
Taggart. H. A., Tiffin, Ohio. 
Talentine, J,, Ashland, Ohio. 

Thayer, Wm., company C, 18th Michigan infantry, Fairfield, Mich. 
Thomas, Marion, company E, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Marysville, Tenn. 
Thompson, J. B,, company H, 6th Kentucky cavalry, St, Mary's, Ky. 
Thompson, Mart., company I, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Marysville, Tenn. 
Thompson, J. W., Fishers Switch, Ind. 
Thorn, Thos. J., La Fayette, Ind. 
Thrasher, S. J., company G, bth Kentucky cavalry. Browns X Road8» 

Ky. 
Tift, H., Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio. 

54 



426 LOSS OF THE SULTANA. 

Tipton, C. C, company B, 3d Tennessee cavalry, Trundle's X Roads, 

Tonn. 
Tracy, Wilson S,, company H, 102d Ohio infantry, Fredericksburg, Ohio. 
Trent, R. A., company B, 1st Tennessee cavalry, Mitchburg, Tenn. 
Van Fleet, H. C, company I, Uth Ohio infantry, Moncloon, Ohio. 
Tan Nuys, Isaac, company D, 57th Indiana infantry, Bethel, Ind. 
Van Scayce, J. W., company A, 64th Ohio infantry, Luray, Kan. 
Van Vlack, Alonzo, company F, 18th Michigan infantry, Cambria, Mich. 
Varnell, Albert, company I, 3d Tennessee cavalry, New Knob Ck, Tenn. 
Vergin, John, New Britton,Ind. 

Walker, J. L., company B, 50th Ohio infantry, Hamilton, Ohio. 
Wallace, H. B., company A, 124th Ohio infantry, Brooklyn Village, 

Ohio. 
Waltermier, J. J., company B, 57th Ohio infantry, Fostoria, Ohio. 
Warner, W. C, company B, 9th Indiana cavalry, Wellington, Kan. 
Watts, G. W., company E, 97th Ohio infantry, Sonora, Ohio. 
Weicard, A. B., company K, 18th Michigan infantry. North Toledo, Ohio. 
Wendt, Wm., company L, 8th Michigan cavalry, Capac. Mich. 
Whetmore, Al„ company (5, 115th Ohio infantry, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio. 
White, Geo., company B, 8th Michigan cavalry, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
White, Manly C, company B, 8th Michigan cavalry, Hartford, Mich. 
Williams, N. S., company B, 5th Indiana cavalry, Chester, Ind. 
Williams, W. H., company F, 18th Michigan infantry, Joneaville, Mich. 
Wilson, R. S., company F, 95th Ohio infantry, Winiield, Kan. 
Wismire, Abraham, Mifflin, Ohio. 
Wood, Henry, company D, 18th Michigan infantry, Air Line Junction* 

Ohio. 
Wright, Francis, company B, 18th Michigan infantry, Adria", Mich. 
Young, G. N., company A, 95th Ohio infantry, Evans, Col. 
Zacharias, A. K., 7th Michigan infantry, Ypsilanti, Mich. 
Zaizer, J. P., company F, 115th Ohio infantry, Canton, Ohio. 
Zimmerman, J., Altamont, 111. 



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